Mahbub Ali Khan, Asaf Jah VI

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Lieutenant-General His Highness Rustam-i-Dauran, Arustu-i-Zaman, Wal Mamaluk, Asaf Jah VI, Muzaffar ul-Mamaluk, Nizam ul-Mulk, Nizam ud-Daula, Nawab Mir Sir

Mahbub Ali Khan Bahadur

Sipah Salar, Fath Jang, Nizam of Hyderabad, GCB, GCSI
Asaf Jah VI.jpg
Nizam of Hyderabad
Reign26 February 1869 – 29 August 1911
PredecessorAfzal ad-Dawlah, Asaf Jah V
SuccessorMir Osman Ali Khan, Asaf Jah VII
Born18 August 1866
Purani Haveli, Hyderabad, Hyderabad State, British Indian Empire
(now in Telangana State, India)
Died29 August 1911 (aged 45)
Falaknuma Palace, Hyderabad, Hyderabad State, British Indian Empire
(now in Telangana State, India)
Burial
SpouseAmat uz-Zehra Begum
HouseAsaf Jahi dynasty
FatherAfzal ad-Dawlah, Asaf Jah V

Asaf Jah VI Mir Mahboob Ali Khan Siddiqi Bayafandi GCB GCSI (18 August 1866 – 29 August 1911) was the 6th Nizam of Hyderabad. He ruled Hyderabad state, one of the Princely states in India between 1869 and 1911.[1][2]

Early life and education[edit]

Mahbub Ali Khan as a child
Installation of the Nizam of Hyderabad by the Governor-General of India

Mir Mahbub Ali Khan was born on 18 August 1866 at Purani Haveli in Hyderabad State. He was the only surviving son of Afzal ad-Dawlah, Asaf Jah V. When his father died he was two years and seven months old, and thus became the sixth Nizam of the Asaf Jahi dynasty in 1869. He was installed as Nizam by Salar Jung I and the British Resident.

Nawab Rasheed-ud-din Khan Shams-ul-Umra III and Salar Jung I functioned as the Regent. Shams-ul-Umra III died on 12 December 1881 and Salar Jung I became the sole regent. He was retained as administrator and regent until his death on 8 February 1883.[3] Special attention was paid to the education of Mahbub Ali Khan who was tutored by the English. With the concurrence of Salar Jung, Capt. John Clerk was appointed to tutor him and scholars well versed in Persian, Arabic and Urdu were also engaged as tutors. The personality and noble life of Sir Salar Jung had a great influence on Asaf Jah VI.

Asaf Jah VI was a respected ruler and was popularly known as Mahbub Ali Pasha. Dr. Abdul Husain, later given the title Arastu Yar Jung, was physician to Mahbub Ali Khan. As such, Asaf Jah VI often sought counsel for matters concerning the Bubonic plague epidemic that worried Hyderabad, and other matters as well.

The young Nizam with his two regents and other noblemen
The Nizam riding an elephant in a procession from Moula Ali, circa. 1895

Famine during his rule[edit]

The Great Famine of 1876-1878 occurred during his reign. The entire Deccan, including Hyderabad State, was devastated by food shortages which were enormously exacerbated by British policies. The Nizam distributed aid to famine victims, causing tens of thousands of people to flee to Hyderabad from Sholapur and other affected areas.[4]

Development of a railway network[edit]

The Nizam's Guaranteed State Railway was established in 1879, a railway company fully owned by the Nizam [5]. It was formed to connect Hyderabad with the rest of the British India, and was headquartered at Secunderabad Railway Station. Construction commenced in 1870. After four years of construction works the Secunderabad-Wadi line was built. In 1879, Mahbub Ali Khan took over this railway line; it was then managed by the Nizam's state-owned railway.[6]

After independence, it was integrated into Indian Railways. The introduction of railways also marked the beginning of industry in Hyderabad, and four factories were built to the south and east of the Hussain Sagar lake.

Flood of 1908[edit]

The Great Musi Flood of 1908 ravaged the city of Hyderabad.[7] It affected at least 200,000 people, killing an estimated 15,000.

Death[edit]

The Nizam died on 29th August, 1911 at the age of 45. He was buried alongside his ancestors at Mecca Masjid, Hyderabad. His second son Mir Osman Ali Khan succeeded him.[8]

Personal Life[edit]

The Nizam had seven sons and seven daughters.

Lifestyle[edit]

The Nizam was well known for his extravagant lifestyle and collection of clothes and cars. His collection of clothes was one of the most extensive in the world at the time. He devoted a whole wing of his palace to his wardrobe and would never wear the same outfit twice. He bought the Jacob Diamond, which stands out among the Jewels of The Nizams now owned by the Government of India.

The Nizam was also fluent in Urdu, Telugu and Farsi languages. He also wrote poems in Telugu and Urdu, some of which are inscribed alongside the walls of Tank Bund. He was a keen hunter, killing at least 30 tigers.[9]

Alleged mystic powers[edit]

It was supposed that he possessed a healing power against snake bites. It was his order that if anyone from the public had a snake bite, they could approach him. As a result he was awakened from his sleep a number of times.[10][11]

Titles[edit]

  • 1866–1869: Sahibzada Mir Mahbub Ali Khan Siddiqi Bahadur
  • 1869–1877: His Highness Rustam-i-Dauran, Arustu-i-Zaman, Wal Mamaluk, Asaf Jah VI, Muzaffar ul-Mamaluk, Nizam ul-Mulk, Nizam ud-Daula, Nawab Mir Mahbub 'Ali Khan Bahadur, Sipah Salar, Fath Jang, Nizam of Hyderabad
  • 1877–1884: His Highness Rustam-i-Dauran, Arustu-i-Zaman, Wal Mamaluk, Asaf Jah VI, Muzaffar ul-Mamaluk, Nizam ul-Mulk, Nizam ud-Daula, Nawab Mir Mahbub 'Ali Khan Siddiqi Bahadur, Sipah Salar, Fath Jang, Nizam of Hyderabad
  • 1884–1902: His Highness Rustam-i-Dauran, Arustu-i-Zaman, Wal Mamaluk, Asaf Jah VI, Muzaffar ul-Mamaluk, Nizam ul-Mulk, Nizam ud-Daula, Nawab Mir Sir Mahbub 'Ali Khan Bahadur, Sipah Salar, Fath Jang, Nizam of Hyderabad, GCSI
  • 1902–1910: His Highness Rustam-i-Dauran, Arustu-i-Zaman, Wal Mamaluk, Asaf Jah VI, Muzaffar ul-Mamaluk, Nizam ul-Mulk, Nizam ud-Daula, Nawab Mir Sir Mahbub 'Ali Khan Bahadur, Sipah Salar, Fath Jang, Nizam of Hyderabad, GCB, GCSI
  • 1910–1911: Lieutenant-General His Highness Rustam-i-Dauran, Arustu-i-Zaman, Wal Mamaluk, Asaf Jah VI, Muzaffar ul-Mamaluk, Nizam ul-Mulk, Nizam ud-Daula, Nawab Mir Sir Mahbub 'Ali Khan Siddiqi Bahadur, Sipah Salar, Fath Jang, Nizam of Hyderabad, GCB, GCSI

Honours[edit]

(ribbon bar, as it would look today)

Order of the Bath UK ribbon.svg Ord.Stella.India.jpg Empress of India Medal.png Med.DelhiDurbar1903.png Ord.Aquilarossa-GC.png

British honours

Foreign honours

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Law, Modern Hyderabad (Deccan) 1914, pp. 27-28.
  2. ^ Balfour, The cyclopædia of India and of Eastern and Southern Asia, pp. 897.
  3. ^ Law, Modern Hyderabad (Deccan) 1914, pp. 26-27.
  4. ^ Davis, Mike. "Late Victorian Holocausts: El Niño Famines and the Making of the Third World". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  5. ^ Law, Modern Hyderabad (Deccan), pp. 26-28.
  6. ^ Lynton, Days of the Beloved 1987, pp. 56-57.
  7. ^ Lynton, The Days of the Beloved, pp. 13-20.
  8. ^ Law, Modern Hyderabad (Deccan) 1914, pp. 28.
  9. ^ "Staying at Falaknuma is like holding a mirror up to our past". 2012-09-16.
  10. ^ Lallana Rāya. Tulasī kī sāhitya-sādhanā: The Legacy of the Nizams". H.E.H The Nizam's Urdu Trust Hyderabad.
  11. ^ "Picturing the 'Beloved'".

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Mahbub Ali Khan, Asaf Jah VI
Preceded by
Afzal ad-Dawlah, Asaf Jah V
Nizam of Hyderabad
1869–1911
Succeeded by
Osman Ali Khan, Asaf Jah VII

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