Maida Heatter

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Maida Heatter
Born(1916-09-07)September 7, 1916
DiedJune 6, 2019(2019-06-06) (aged 102)
OccupationCookbook author
Spouse(s)
  • David E. Evins
  • Ellis Gimbel Jr.
  • Ralph Daniels (until his death)
Children1
Parent(s)
FamilyMerrill Heatter (cousin)

Maida Heatter (September 7, 1916 – June 6, 2019) was an American pastry chef and cookbook author who specialized in baking and desserts.

Biography[edit]

Heatter was born in Baldwin, New York, the daughter of radio commentator Gabriel Heatter and Saidie Heatter (née Hermalin).[1] She graduated from New York's Pratt Institute in fashion design and began a career as an illustrator of merchandising, then subsequently switching to jewellery design, and then finally becoming a baker and baking instructor.[2]

Her career as a professional cookbook author began when her skills in dessert making caught the attention of Craig Claiborne, a former food section editor of the New York Times.[2] In part through his numerous endorsements for her[3] and his suggestion to her to write her own cookbook, Heatter began her decades-long career in teaching baking and writing cookbooks.[2]

The quality of her recipes caught the attention of many prominent figures in the trade of cooking and baking,[2] garnering praise from numerous celebrity and media sources.[4] Heatter's cookbooks have been the recipient of three James Beard Foundation Awards, and she herself was inducted into the Who's Who of Food & Beverage in America in 1988. She was also inducted into the Chocolatier Magazine Hall of Fame.[5]

Personal life[edit]

Heatter was married three times. In 1940, she married shoe designer David E. Evins, who was also Jewish; they had one daughter before divorcing.[6] In 1949, she married Ellis Gimbel Jr., grandson of Adam Gimbel and brother of Richard Gimbel.[7][8] In 1966, she married Ralph Daniels (died 1994).[9] Her only child, daughter Toni Evins, died in a glider accident in 1994.[8] She turned 100 in September 2016[10] and died in June 2019 at the age of 102.[11]

Awards[edit]

  • James Beard Foundation Awards[12]
    • 1998 Cookbook Hall of Fame Maida Heatter's Book of Great Desserts
    • 1988 Who's Who of Food & Beverage in America
    • 1981 Single Subject Book Maida Heatter's Book of Great Chocolate Desserts
    • 1978 Specialty Book Maida Heatter's Book of Great Cookies

References[edit]

  1. ^ Genzlinger, Neil (June 7, 2019). "Maida Heatter, Cookbook Writer and the 'Queen of Cake,' Dies at 102". The New York Times. Retrieved June 8, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d Hobart, Christy, The Queen of Cake, Saveur
  3. ^ Hesser, Amanda (11 March 2009), 1966: Maida Heatter’s Popovers, New York Times
  4. ^ The Maida Heatter Classic Library, Cader Books
  5. ^ Maida Heatter's Biography, starchefs.com
  6. ^ Nottingham, Leslie L. (2009). "Well Heeled Lifestyles: The Shoes of David Evins and the Women Who Wore Them, 1947-1991" (PDF). The Smithsonian Associates and Corcoran College of Art + Desig.
  7. ^ "Ellis Gimbel Jr., Stock Broker, 66". New York Times. January 5, 1964.
  8. ^ a b Hamlin, Suzanne (December 7, 1995). "Cookies A Hallmark For Heatter". New York Times. Before her 29-year marriage to Daniels, she was married to Ellis Gimbel, a scion of the department store family, and to David Evins, the shoe designer. Toni Evins, Heatter's only child and her daughter with Evins, died last year at 45 in a freak glider accident. Daniels died of cancer three months later.
  9. ^ Sullivan, Barbara (May 2, 1985). "Dessert Still Plays Vital Role in Life of Maida Heatter". Orlando Sentinel.
  10. ^ Ellen Morrissey (2017-03-20). "The Queen of Cakes, That's Maida Heatter". marthastewart.com. Retrieved 2018-10-11.
  11. ^ Scattergood, Amy (June 6, 2019). "Maida Heatter, the queen of chocolate desserts, dies at 102". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  12. ^ JBF Awards, James Beard Foundation