Maiken Nedergaard

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Maiken Nedergaard is a Danish neuroscientist who discovered the glymphatic system while working at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She is now a professor at University of Copenhagen's Center of Basic and Translational Neuroscience.

Discoveries[edit]

In 2010, Nedergaard discovered the role of the adenosine molecule in acupuncture-induced analgesia.[1]

In 2013, Nedergaard discovered the glymphatic system - a network of channels in the brain whose purpose is to eliminate toxins using cerebrospinal fluid. She called it the "glymphatic system" due to its dependence on glial cells.[2] She was awarded the 2014 Newcomb Cleveland Prize for her discovery.[3]

In 2014, she moved to Copenhagen on a Novo Nordisk Foundation Laureate Research Grant in 2014 where she is now a professor at University of Copenhagen's Center of Basic and Translational Neuroscience.[4]

Awards and honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilkinson, Emma (30 May 2010). "Acupuncture pain molecule pinpointed". BBC. Retrieved 18 February 2014. 
  2. ^ Konnikova, Maria (11 January 2014). "Goodnight. Sleep Clean.". The New York Times. Retrieved 18 February 2014. She called it the glymphatic system, a nod to its dependence on glial cells 
  3. ^ "Paper on Sleep's Restorative Effects Wins 2014 AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize". American Association for the Advancement of Science. Retrieved 24 February 2015. 
  4. ^ "Tre international forskere flytter til København". Novo Nordisk Foundation (in Danish). Retrieved 24 February 2015.