Maillardville

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Maillardville
Notre Dame de Lourdes Church on Laval Square
Notre Dame de Lourdes Church on Laval Square
Maillardville is located in Greater Vancouver Regional District
Maillardville
Location of Maillardville within Metro Vancouver
Coordinates: 49°14′15″N 122°52′01″W / 49.2374°N 122.867°W / 49.2374; -122.867Coordinates: 49°14′15″N 122°52′01″W / 49.2374°N 122.867°W / 49.2374; -122.867
Country Canada
Province British Columbia
RegionLower Mainland
Regional districtMetro Vancouver
CityCoquitlam
Named forEdmond Maillard
Government
 • MayorRichard Stewart
 • MP (Fed.)Bonita Zarrillo (NDP)
 • MLA (Prov.)Selina Robinson (NDP)
Population
 (2016)[1][2][3]
 • Total14,975
Time zoneUTC−8 (PST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (PDT)
Postal code span
V3K
Area codes604, 778, 236, 672
Websitemaillardville.com

Maillardville is a community on the south slope of the city of Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada.

History[edit]

In 1889, Frank Ross and James McLaren opened what would become Maillardville, a $350,000, modern lumber mill on the north bank of the Fraser River. By 1908, a mill town of 20 houses, a store, post office, hospital, office block, barber shop, pool hall and a Sikh temple[4] had grown around the mill. A mill manager's residence was built that later became Place des Arts.[5] A second mill manager's residence was built in 1909 and is now known as Mackin House, a historic house museum operated by the Coquitlam Heritage Society.

In 1909, Ross and McLaren, in search of workers for the Canadian Western Lumber Company, recruited a contingent of 110 French Canadian mill workers from Eastern Ontario and Quebec.[6] Approximately 40 French Canadian families settled in present-day Maillardville in 1909, with another contingent arriving in June 1910.[6] Named for Father Edmond Maillard, a young Oblate from France, it became the largest Francophone centre west of Manitoba.[7] Similarly, in the early 1900s, many Punjabis came to work in the mills and settled on the south slope of Coquitlam.[4]

In 1971, the City of Coquitlam and the Village of Fraser Mills were amalgamated, which gave the city a larger tax base. The mill closed in 2001, and is now rezoned into a residential area.[5] Maillardville's past is recognized today in street names, the Francophone education system and French immersion programs, French-language guides and scouts, and celebrations such as Festival du Bois.[8]

Maillardville celebrated its 100th birthday in 2009.[9]

In 2014, the City of Coquitlam updated the Maillardville neighbourhood plan. The city anticipates a population growth of 6,000 over the next two decades.[10]

Geography[edit]

Maillardville is bordered by Austin Avenue to the north and Lougheed Highway to the south. To the west it is flanked by Blue Mountain Street, while to the east it is bordered by Mundy Road. The town centre of Maillardville is situated in the southwest corner of the neighbourhood, on Brunette Avenue between Lougheed Highway and Woolridge Street.[11]

Demographics[edit]

Population[edit]

Population history
YearPop.±%
200614,014—    
201114,500+3.5%
201614,975+3.3%
Source: Statistics Canada[12][13][1][2][3]

Ethnicity[edit]

Ethnic groups in Maillardville (2016)[14][15][16]
Ethnic group Population %
European 8,055 54.6%
East Asian 2,825 19.2%
Southeast Asian 1,275 8.6%
South Asian 980 6.6%
Aboriginal 620 4.2%
Middle Eastern 475 3.2%
Latin American 280 1.9%
Black 245 1.7%
Other 295 2%
Total population 14,975 100%

Language[edit]

Languages spoken in Maillardville (2016)[17][18][19]
Language %
English 59.5%
Korean 5.1%
Mandarin 4.7%
Cantonese 4.7%
Tagalog 4.1%
Punjabi 3.2%
Persian 2.4%
French 1.8%
Other 14.6%
Total % 100%

Media[edit]

They Dream, a Canadian feature-length film, set in and around Maillardville, including Place des Arts and Mackin House Museum, was shot over the summer of 2012. Written and directed by Vancouver filmmaker Gord Stanfield, They Dream is the story of a 20-year-old art student, David Dubois, his love affair with a mysterious woman Lisa Reese, and his tragic past. Jean Ory reminds David he can't escape the truth. Lisa and Jean were lifetime residents of Maillardville. They Dream's lead cast includes Jason Mireau, Delia Tatiana and Moishe Teichman.

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330282.01 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  2. ^ a b Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330282.02 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  3. ^ a b Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330281.02 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  4. ^ a b Eagland, Nick (7 April 2019). "Sikh Heritage Month: The South Asian pioneers of Fraser Mills". Vancouver Sun.
  5. ^ a b Fraser Mills: HistoryArchived 13 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 15 February 2009
  6. ^ a b Kenny, Nicolas (14 June 2019). "Francophones of British Columbia". In Cooper, Celine (ed.). The Canadian Encyclopedia. Historica Canada. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  7. ^ City of Coquitlam: History and Heritage Retrieved 15 February 2009
  8. ^ CitySoup.ca: Coquitlam Regional History Archived 5 August 2009 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 15 February 2009
  9. ^ Maillardville100.com: 100 Years of History Archived 28 February 2009 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 22 February 2009
  10. ^ "Maillardville Neighbourhood Plan". City of Coquitlam.
  11. ^ "Maillardville Community Profile". City of Coquitlam.
  12. ^ "Tri-Cities Community Profile" (PDF).
  13. ^ "Census tract profile for 0282.00 (CT), Vancouver (CMA) and British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  14. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330282.01 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  15. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330282.02 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  16. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330281.02 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  17. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330282.01 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  18. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330282.02 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.
  19. ^ Government of Canada, Statistics Canada (8 February 2017). "Census Profile, 2016 Census - 9330281.02 [Census tract], British Columbia and Vancouver [Census metropolitan area], British Columbia". www12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 15 November 2022.

External links[edit]