Main–Weser Railway

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Main-Weser Railway
Overview
Native name Main-Weser-Bahn
Type Heavy rail, Passenger/freight rail
Intercity rail, Regional rail, Commuter rail
Status Operational
Locale Hesse, Germany
Termini Kassel Hbf
Frankfurt Hbf
Stations 52
Line number 3900
Operation
Opened Stages between 1848 and 1852
Owner Deutsche Bahn
Operator(s) DB Bahn
Technical
Line length 199.8 km (124.1 mi)
Number of tracks 2 (throughout)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
Electrification 15 kV/16.7 Hz AC overhead catenary
Operating speed 160 km/h (99 mph)
Route number
  • 614.9 (RegioTram to Treysa)
  • 620 (Kassel–Gießen)
  • 630 (Gießen–Frankfurt)
  • 645.6 (S-Bahn to Friedberg)
Route map
0.000
Kassel Hbf
System change 600 V = / 15 kV ~
2.500
Kassel-Kirchditmold
(until 1984)
Kassel tramway
Wilhelmshöher Allee
Kassel tramway
3.829
Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe
4.300
7.0
Korbacher Straße (formerly B 520)
7.3
Kassel Oberzwehren junction
7.9
Kassel-Oberzwehren
8.9
Kassel-Keilsberg
10.0
10.7
Baunatal-Rengershausen
11.4
13.5
13.7
Baunatal-Guntershausen
16.6
Edermünde-Grifte
17.2
18.2
20.0
Felsberg-Wolfershausen
23.5
Felsberg-Altenbrunslar
27.4
Felsberg-Gensungen
30.3
33.9
Wabern (Bz Kassel)
34.0
37.3
L 3148
37.4
Uttershausen (junction)
to Wabern Kimm (siding)
37.8
39.3
L 3149
39.4
Singlis
PREAG siding
42.9
Borken (Hessen)
43.4
PREAG power station
and mine railway
44.6
PREAG siding
47.4
L 3067
49.2
Zimmersrode
216 m
50.1
Kellerwald Railway
to Gemünden (Wohra)
54.7
Schlierbach (Schwalm-Eder-Kr)
60.7
Treysa
(Keilbahnhof) (until 1908)
61.1
61.5
61.9
61.9
62.3
Treysa
(since 1908)
67.0
67.1
Schwalmstadt-Wiera
70.1
NVV
RMV
tariff border
71.1
Neustadt (Hessen)
76.0
Weser
Main
watershed
80.0
Herrenwald barracks
81.4
siding
82.1
Stadtallendorf
83.1
Langenstein
(Bk)
89.2
Kirchhain
Wohra Valley Railway
to Gemünden (Wohra)
90.1
90.2
94.2
Anzefahr
97.3
Bürgeln
98.0
99.2
99.5
99.8
100.3
Cölbe
101.4
102.1
Wehrda
(Bk)
104.2
Marburg (Lahn)
Marburg Mitte
(planned)
107.2
Marburg South
(passengers until 1956)
107.4
Marburg-Süd
181 m
107.6
Heizöllager
(until 1998)
107.7
former connecting track
108.5
B 255 / L 3125
108.6
industrial siding until 1998
108.7
 
 
109.1
110.0
Gisselberg
(Bk)
110.5
111.9
Niederweimar
115.4
Niederwalgern
(former Keilbahnhof)
118.9
Fronhausen (Lahn)
119.6
DB siding substation
119.6
122.8
Friedelhausen
125.3
125.9
Lollar
(island station)
126.6
128.7
132.9
Gießen Oswaldsgarten
133.0
133.0
Gießen Kleinbahnhof
(until 1952)
133.4
Gießen Pbf/Rbf Ültg I
134.0
Gießen
Gießen freight yard
freight line
135.5
135.7
136.6
Gießen-Bergwald
137.5
139.7
Großen Linden
141.2
143.4
Lang Göns
146.1
Kirch-Göns
151.0
Butzbach-Lich railway
(connecting curve…
151.3
…to HLB workshop and Münzenberg)
151.3
151.9
Butzbach
154.6
Ostheim (Butzbach)
156.9
151.3
161.9
Bad Nauheim /
Bad Nauheim Nord (BLE)
163.1
164.4
164.3
Horloff Valley Railway
from Wölfersheim-Södel
165.0
165.4
Friedberg
(first station until 1913)
165.9
Friedberg (Hess)
terminus of S6Frankfurt S6.svg
148 m
Friedberg freight yard
factory siding
line to Friedrichsdorf
(crossing until 1968)
line to Hanau (grade-separated)
168.4
Friedberg Görbelheim
(junction)
170.1
Bruchenbrücken
172.8
Rosbach Bridge
173.0
Nieder-Wöllstadt
B 3
176.2
Okarben
since 1894
178.4
Groß-Karben
179.2
industrial siding
181.4
Dortelweil
Nidder Valley Railway
183.6
Bad Vilbel
184.5
Nidda bridge
184.9
Bad Vilbel Süd
B 3
187.4
LC 99 Berkersheimer Bahnstraße
187.5
Frankfurt-Berkersheim
189.4
Frankfurter Berg
(Frankfurt-Bonames until 1986)
190.3
call barrier
191.6
Frankfurt-Eschersheim
U-Bahn lines U1, U2, U3
193.2
Frankfurt-Ginnheim (passenger station until
1989, reactivation suspended in 2016)
U-Bahn line U1
195.4
S-Bahn overbridge
from Frankfurt-Rödelheim
S3Frankfurt S3.svgS4Frankfurt S4.svgS5Frankfurt S5.svg
branch to Homburg Railway
196.4
Frankfurt West
197.3
Frankfurt Messe
198.1
Frankfurt Galluswarte
Main-Neckar Railway, goods track
Hauptbahnhof approach
(Main Railway etc)
199.8
Frankfurt Hauptbahnhof
Frankfurt Main-Weser station
(to 1888)
Source: German railway atlas[1]

The Main–Weser Railway (German: Main-Weser-Bahn) is a railway line in central Germany that runs from Frankfurt am Main via Gießen to Kassel. it is named after the railway company that built the line and also operated it until 1880. It was opened between 1849 and 1852 and was one of the first railways in Germany.

Route[edit]

Based on today’s kilometre markers the line is 199.8 km (124.1 mi) long between its termini. It is double-tracked and electrified. Its maximum speed limit is 160 km/h (99.4 mph), but this is only achievable in places on the southern part of the line. The Main–Weser Railway is one of the most important conventionally operated German railways.

History[edit]

Main-Weser station in Frankfurt in 1889
Covered forecourt at Kassel Wilhelmshöhe station
Signal box on watershed between Weser and Rhine rivers

The idea of building the Main–Weser Railway began in 1838 as a link between Kassel and the Rhine-Main area running exclusively through the territory of Hesse-Kassel (Kurhessen) and connecting the major cities of the electorate from Kassel to Hanau via Fulda. At that time it proved impracticable to build such a line (the route of the Frederick William Northern Railway and the Frankfurt–Bebra railway) because of its mountainous route, particularly at the watershed between the Fulda and Kinzig valleys at Distelrasen, where a tunnel was only completed in 1914.

So instead from 1841 negotiations commenced with some other states and was interrupted several times. On 5 April 1845, a treaty was signed between the Free City of Frankfurt, the Grand Duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt and the Electorate of Hesse-Kassel, establishing a joint state railway company, known as a condominium railway (Kondominalbahn). This established the legal basis for the line via Marburg, Gießen and Friedberg through easier terrain to the originally preferred route, but which crossed national boundaries several times. In the southern sector the route ran after its exit from the Main-Weser station in Frankfurt approximately parallel with the street of Taunusstraße (at that time, only partly built), along the current streets of Friedrich-Ebert-Anlage and Hamburger Allee to the then Kurhessen town of Bockenheim, now the site of Frankfurt (Main) West station. It then ran again through the territory of Frankfurt in Hausen, through Kurhessen in Eschersheim, and through Frankfurt territory in Bonames. The line then went through the Grand Duchy of Hesse town of Boden bis Friedberg, then a piece of Frankfurt-owned territory in Dortelweil. Bad Nauheim was a Kurhessen enclave within the Grand Duchy of Hesse exclave of Oberhessen through which the line ran to Gießen. Under the treaty, each of the participating governments were responsible for the purchase of land on their territory. Financing the construction of the line proved to be more difficult. Construction occurred during the turmoil of the revolutions of 1848 and a financial crisis in the Grand Duchy of Hesse.

Work began on 6 August 1846 in Kurhessen territory. Here the Belgian engineer Frans Splingard and his colleague Edward Hacault were in charge. In Frankfurt construction was directed by Remigius Eyssen. The building of station on almost all sections of the line in Kurhessen was directed by Julius Eugen Ruhl, the first Director General of the Kurhessen railways.

The first section between Kassel and Wabern was opened on 29 December 1849. The first continuous rail service from Kassel to Frankfurt ran on 15 May 1852, after the opening of the line between Gießen and Langgöns, connecting the northern and the southern sections of the line.

The second track was added in 1865—following twelve years of negotiations. The cooperation of the participating countries had not improved despite rapidly developing rail services. The second track significantly eased the transport of Prussian troops in the War of 1866, a war which led to the annexation by Prussia of two of the states involved in Main–Weser Railway, Hesse-Kassel and the Free City of Frankfurt. Their shares were subsequently transferred to Prussia. In 1880, Prussia also acquired the Grand Duchy of Hesse’s shares in the company.

Until the completion of the Frankfurt–Bebra line in 1866, all express trains between Frankfurt and Berlin ran on the Main–Weser Railway. These trains ran on to the Frederick William Northern Railway at Guntershausen to connect with the Thuringian Railway. Express trains continued to run from Frankfurt to Berlin via Kassel until the end of World War II. In the following years of the American occupation trains also ran on this route.

In 1878/79 the TreysaLollar section of the line was incorporated into the strategic railway known as the Kanonenbahn ("Cannons Railway") built between Berlin and Metz.

During the 1960s, the first section of the line was electrified between Frankfurt and Giessen; electrification of the line was completed on 20 March 1967.

The line was moved in the Kassel area in the second half of the 1980s in preparation for the construction of the Hanover–Würzburg high-speed railway. Construction began in July 1985. 420,000 m³ of soil was excavated over a length of 5.7 kilometres and relocated at a cost of DM 24.0 million. Operations on two tracks was maintained throughout.[2]

Operation Steel Box also took place on the line in September 1990.[3]

Long-distance services[edit]

Services of Intercity line 26 run on the Main-Weser Railway from Stralsund or Hamburg-Altona via Kassel and Frankfurt am Main to Karlsruhe at two-hour intervals. Services on EuroCity line 62 also ran on the Gießen – Frankfurt section from December 2009 to December 2011. Until 2014 there were services that ran over the line to Konstanz, but these were cancelled at the timetable change at the end of 2014. There was also a direct connection to Berlin-Südkreuz until the end of 2015, which was the first Intercity service on the line from Monday to Saturday. Since then, this IC service runs to Hamburg like the others.

Even earlier there were direct long-distance services from Frankfurt via Gießen and Siegen to Hagen and beyond to Münster and the North Sea. One train even went to Copenhagen.

Regional services[edit]

cantus regional service on a staff training operation in Friedberg (2006), running to North Hesse
Class 423 set as S6 near Groß Karben

Regional-Express services run between Frankfurt and Kassel (Main-Weser-Express) and between Frankfurt and Siegen (Main-Sieg-Express). The latter leave the line in Gießen, where they have to reverse to continue towards Siegen.

The Main-Weser-Express runs hourly and is operated alternatively by DB Regio as line 30 and by the Hessische Landesbahn (HLB) as line 98, but the latter service does not always go through to Kassel and has more intermediate stops. The Main-Sieg-Express is exclusively operated by the Hessischen Landesbahn as line 99 operated and runs on the Frankfurt-Gießen section at two-hour intervals, mostly in coupled-sets, together with line 98, with trains dividing in Gießen. It is also served by Regionalbahn services operated by DB Regio between Marburg and Gießen as well as between Gießen and Hanau via Friedberg. Since December 2006, Mittelhessen-Express services are formed in Gießen from two coupled Regionalbahn trains coming from Treysa and Dillenburg and then together run to Frankfurt at higher speed. In the opposite direction, uncoupling of the sets also takes place in Gießen, with both trains then continuing as Regionalbahn trains to Treysa or Dillenburg. There is also an S-Bahn service between Friedberg and Frankfurt South station via the City-Tunnel.

The Treysa–Kassel section was operated until December 2015 as part of Kassel RegioTram and was designated as line RT 9. The weekend RegioTram services were, however, replaced by Regionalbahn services on at the end of May 2007 and services on working days were also later replaced as well. Since 14 December 2014, two of three services have been operated on weekdays by Kurhessenbahn (a Deutsche Bahn brand) using class 628 diesel multiple unit sets. FLIRT multiple units operated by Hessische Landesbahn replaced the RegioTrams on line RT 9 at the 2015/2016 timetable change on 13 December 2015.

Numerous trains that branch off on branch lines at Bad Vilbel, Friedberg, Gießen, Cölbe and Wabern also run for a while on the main line.

Many freight trains also run on the line, including numerous container trains or trains carrying new agricultural machinery (such as tractors and combine harvesters). Military trains also regularly use the line.

Rolling stock used[edit]

Main line[edit]

Five-part FLIRT of the HLB in Gießen

Talent 2 electric multiple units are used for the hourly Mittelhessen-Express between Frankfurt and Treysa, which are operated by DB Regio Mitte. Talent-2 sets have run since March 2013 on the through Gießen–Friedberg–Hanau Regionalbahn service, which has operated since December 2012. These sets replaced Silberling carriages hauled by class 143 locomotives or GTW 2/6 sets operated by Hessische Landesbahn.[4] Class 143 locomotives occasionally haul modernised Silberling carriages between Gießen and Marburg, Kirchhain and Treysa in the peak hours.

The DB Regional-Express services between Frankfurt and Kassel are almost exclusively operated as double-deck push-pull trains, hauled by Bombardier TRAXX (class 146) locomotives. At the 2010/2011 timetable change, Hessische Landesbahn (HLB) took over the operation of some services between Frankfurt am Main, Marburg and Siegen, branded as the Main-Sieg-Express, on behalf of the Rhein-Main-Verkehrsverbund (Rhine-Main Transport Association) and the Zweckverband Nahverkehr Westphalen-Lippe (municipal association for local transport of Westphalia-Lippe). Newly procured three and five-part Stadler Flirt railcars are used. These partly replaced Deutsche Bahn’s double-deck push-pull trains and rebuilt Silberling carriages. The trains are usually uncoupled in Gießen with portions continuing to Marburg and Siegen.

The RegioTram service that ran between Kassel and Treysa until December 2015 consisted of a low-floor RegioCitadis (class 452). The S6 S-Bahn section south of Friedberg is operated by class 423 S-Bahn sets.

The Intercity sets are usually operated with push–pull sets composed of Intercity or former InterRegio coaches hauled by class 101 or class 120 electric locomotives. Occasionally, during construction or breakdowns on the Hanover–Würzburg high-speed railway, Intercity-Express services are also diverted between Frankfurt (Main) Hauptbahnhof and Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe, which as a result do not stop in Fulda and Hanau. Freight traffic is also operated in the form of end-to-end trains by various railway companies.

Line Route Operating interval Rolling stock used Operator
Peak hour Shoulder Off-peak
IC 26 Hamburg-Altona Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe – Wabern (Bz Kassel) – Treysa – Stadtallendorf  – Marburg (Lahn) Gießen – Friedberg (Hess) Frankfurt (Main) – Karlsruhe 120 120 120 101 + 7 IC coaches DB Fernverkehr AG
Main-Weser-Express RE 30 Kassel – Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe – Wabern (Bz Kassel) – Treysa – Stadtallendorf – Marburg (Lahn) – Gießen – Friedberg (Hess) – Frankfurt (Main) 120 120 120 146 + 6 or 7 double-deckers DB Regio Mitte
Main-Sieg-Express RE 98/RE 99 Siegen – Gießen – Friedberg (Hess) – Frankfurt (Main) 60 60 60 five-part FLIRT HLB
Kassel – Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe – Wabern (Bz Kassel) – Treysa – Stadtallendorf – Marburg (Lahn) 120 120 120 five-part FLIRT HLB
Mittelhessen-Express RB 40/RB 41 Treysa – Stadtallendorf – Marburg (Lahn) – Gießen – Friedberg (Hess) – Frankfurt (Main) 60 60 120 442 DB Regio Mitte
Dillenburg – Herborn (Dillkr) Wetzlar – 60 60 120 442 DB Regio Mitte
RB 49 Gießen – Friedberg (Hess) – Hanau 120 120 120 442 DB Regio Mitte
RB 48 Nidda – Beienheim – Friedberg (Hess) (– Bad Vilbel Frankfurt (Main)) 30 60 120 GTW 2/6 / cl 245 + double-deckers (2× Mon–Fri) HLB / DB Regio Mitte
RB 34 Glauburg-Stockheim – Bad Vilbel Frankfurt (Main) 30 60 642 / cl 245 + 4 double-deckers (4× Mon–Fri) DB Regio Mitte
R 39 Kassel – Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe – Wabern (Bz Kassel) – Fritzlar – Bad Wildungen 120 120 120 GTW 2/6 Kurhessenbahn
S6Frankfurt S6.svg Friedberg (Hess) – Bad Vilbel – Frankfurt Hbf (underground) Frankfurt South 15 15 30 423 1 - 3 DB Regio Mitte

Feeder services[edit]

The trains that connect Glauburg-Stockheim and Nidderau with Frankfurt over the Nidda Valley Railway, as well as Nidda to Frankfurt via Friedberg, are hauled by TRAXX (class 245) diesel locomotives in the peak hour, otherwise Desiro (class 642) railcars are used. Class 628 diesel railcars are found between Cölbe and Marburg, sometimes also running to Gießen, which serve the Kreuztal–Cölbe railway to Erndtebrück and the Warburg–Sarnau railway to Frankenberg (Eder). Most trains on the Edersee Railway (Ederseebahn, Bad Wildungen–Wabern) continue over the Main-Weser Railway to Kassel Hbf.

Planned development[edit]

New halt in Marburg[edit]

It is planned in the medium term to build a new Regionalbahn halt called Marburg Mitte in the vicinity of the University of Marburg’s multi-storey buildings. This has been planned for decades and was considered in the timetable concept for the Mittelhessen-Express. A start of construction has not yet been announced. A halt at Gießen-Nord to the north of Oswaldsgarten station is also considered as part of the Mittelhessen S-Bahn concept.

Quadruplication between Frankfurt and Friedberg[edit]

Preliminary end of S-Bahn line 3684 at km 4.6 in Frankfurt-Bockenheim

Between Frankfurt West and Friedberg, S-Bahn, Regional, and long-distance services and freight traffic share the two tracks of the Main-Weser railway. To separate operations, the track in this area are to be rebuilt as four tracks during the next few years in two stages,[5] after which two separate tracks will be available for the S-Bahn. The line speed will be raised to 140 km/h on both the S-Bahn and the long-distance tracks.

The two tracks for the S-Bahn are arranged east or south of the tracks of route 3900 and will be given the new route number of 3684. While the chainage (kilometre markings) on route 3900 (Main-Weser-Bahn) is measured from Kassel in the north-south direction, the chainage on the new line for the S-Bahn will be measured from Frankfurt Hauptbahnhof in the south-north direction.

The planning approval process for the development of the first section from Frankfurt West to Bad Vilbel (with a planned construction period of four years) was completed on 13 May 2004, but not implemented. It was later amended by a planning change under section 76 subsection 1 of the Administrative Procedure Act (Verwaltungsverfahrensgesetz). This was publicly announced in July 2009.[6][7] As a result, the track would be largely equipped with two to six metre-high noise barriers, as a compensatory measure, and an old arm of the Nidda would be restored to a more natural condition.

The citizens' initiative 2statt4 was formed by some residents of Eschersheim and Ginnheim to oppose the whole upgrade through the courts. However, the works approval was already in effect in the Bad Vilbel area,[8] so that the municipality of Bad Vilbel was able to proceed with a planned new underpass under the platforms.

In November 2011, the Hessian Administrative Court (Hessische Verwaltungsgerichtshof, VGH) dismissed complaints from residents and the citizens' initiative 2statt4 against the planning approval decision and an appeal was not permitted.[9][10] Previously, Deutsche Bahn had promised improvements.

The citizens' initiative Bahnane and a private claimant subsequently appealed against the VGH judgment.[11] In various judgments, the Federal Administrative Court dismissed the appeals at the end of January 2013, with the final construction rights now being granted for the first phase of construction.[12] The citizens' initiatives 2statt4 and Bahnane keep trying to prevent the construction of the second stage between Bad Vilbel and Friedberg and to have funding withdrawn for the first stage of construction.

In May 2015, Deutsche Bahn announced that construction would start in the second half of 2017. In addition to the construction of 12.6 kilometres of new tracks, 5 stations would be rebuilt and a station would be built. The cost of the project was stated to be €323 million.[13][14] The development is scheduled to be completed in December 2022.[15]

Neubau Station Frankfurt-Ginnheim[edit]

View from the pedestrian walkway of the Niddapark U-Bahn station to the south, where the beginning of the Ginnheim overtaking loop can be seen at km 194.0

During the construction of the S-Bahn line along the Main-Weser railway a new Frankfurt-Ginnheim station is to be built between Frankfurt West and Frankfurt-Eschersheim for the S-Bahn, which would allow a change to U-Bahn line U1 and U9. It does not yet have planning approval.[15]

This was the location of the operating point of Ginnheim, consisting of an overtaking loop towards Kassel from km 194.0 to 193.2,[16] which was abandoned for the construction of the tracks for the S-Bahn. It was the location of a temporary stop for visitors to the Federal Garden Show in 1989, which became the site of Nidda Park.

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Eisenbahnatlas Deutschland (German railway atlas). Schweers + Wall. 2009. pp. 54, 65–66, 77, 150–53. ISBN 978-3-89494-139-0. 
  2. ^ Deutsche Bundesbahn, Projektgruppe H/W Mitte der Bahnbauzentrale, ed. (c. 1986). Verlegung der Main-Weser-Bahn in Kassel (in German). Frankfurt: Sechsseitiges Leporello. 
  3. ^ Fritz Engbarth (2007). Von der Ludwigsbahn zum Integralen Taktfahrplan – 160 Jahre Eisenbahn in der Pfalz (in German). p. 41. 
  4. ^ "Mehr Komfort auf den Schienen in Mittelhessen" (Press release) (in German). Deutsche Bahn. 7 March 2013. Archived from the original on 9 April 2013. 
  5. ^ "Viergleisiger Ausbau S-Bahn Frankfurt am Main-West - Bad Vilbel" (in German). Deutsche Bahn. Archived from the original on 21 August 2004. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  6. ^ Eisenbahn-Bundesamt, Außenstelle Frankfurt/Main (8 July 2009). "Öffentliche Bekanntmachung betreffend Anpassung der Schallschutzmaßnahmen sowie Auflösung des Vorbehaltes zur vollständigen Kompensation des naturschutzrechtlichen Defizits für den viergleisigen Ausbau der Strecke 3900 Kassel – Frankfurt-West, von Bahnkm 186,630 bis Bahn-km 195,369 in der Stadt Frankfurt am Main". Lokalteil Frankfurt. Frankfurter Rundschau (in German). Frankfurt am Main. pp. 10, 11 Lokalteil Frankfurt. Aktenzeichen 55100-06-0024. 
  7. ^ Jürgen Schultheis (7 July 2009). "Ausbau der S6-Strecke: Freie Fahrt nach Vilbel". Frankfurter Rundschau (in German). Archived from the original on 2 January 2014. Retrieved 3 April 2013. 
  8. ^ "Streckenausbau Main-Weser – Vier Gleise nach Bad Vilbel". Frankfurter Rundschau (in German). 25 January 2010. Archived from the original on 5 November 2010. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  9. ^ "S-Bahn Frankfurt-Vilbel darf ausgebaut werden". Frankfurter Neue Presse (in German). 17 November 2011. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  10. ^ Main-Weser-Bahn (in German). Hessischer Verwaltungsgerichtshof. 
  11. ^ "Angst vor donnernden Güterzügen". 'Frankfurter Rundschau (in German). 24 April 2012. Archived from the original on 30 April 2012. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  12. ^ "Judgment BVerwG 7 B 18.12" (in German). Federal Administrative Court. 7 January 2013. Retrieved 21 January 2018. , "Judgment BVerwG 7 B 20.12" (in German). Federal Administrative Court. 22 January 2013. Retrieved 21 January 2018.  and "Judgment BVerwG 7 B 21.12" (in German). Federal Administrative Court. 25 January 2013. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  13. ^ "Bahn baut Strecke der S6 für mehr als 320 Millionen Euro aus". Darmstädter Echo (in German). 15 May 2015. Archived from the original on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  14. ^ "Bahn baut Strecke nach Bad Vilbel aus". Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (in German). 15 May 2015. Archived from the original on 11 July 2015. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  15. ^ a b Jan Klauth (24 January 2017). "Pläne für die Bahnhöfe. Neue Station Ginnheim bleibt weiter umstritten". Frankfurter Rundschau (in German). p. F4. 
  16. ^ Thomé (1926). Führer über die Linien des Bezirks der Reichsbahndirektion Frankfurt (Main) (in German). Neubearbeitung: Reichsbahndirektion Frankfurt (Main). p. 49. 

Sources[edit]

  • Brake, Ludwig (2000). "Über Fulda oder über Gießen—die Entstehung der Bahnverbindungen zwischen Kassel und Frankfurt im 19. Jahrhundert (Around Fulda or Gießen—the development of the rail links between Kassel and Frankfurt in the 19th Century)". Jahrbuch für Eisenbahngeschichte (Yearbook of Railway History) (in German). 32: 5–16. 
  • Krause, Günter (2000). "Die Lokomotiven der Main-Weser-Bahn (The locomotives of the Main-Weser Railway)". Jahrbuch für Eisenbahngeschichte (Yearbook of Railway History) (in German). 32: 17–27. 
  • Landesamt für Denkmalpflege Hessen (State Conservation Hesse), ed. (2005). Eisenbahn in Hessen. Eisenbahnenbauten- und strecken 1839-1939 (Railways in Hesse. Rail construction and lines 1839-1939) (in German). 2.1,. Stuttgart: Theiss Verlag. pp. 142ff (Strecke 010). ISBN 3-8062-1917-6. 
  • Münzer, Lutz (2000). "Verkehr und Anlagen der nördlichen Main-Weser-Bahn (Transport and facilities of the Northern Main-Weser Railway)". Jahrbuch für Eisenbahngeschichte (Yearbook of Railway History) (in German). 32: 28–60. 
  • Münzer, Lutz. "Vom Kondominat zur Preußischen Staatseisenbahn—aus der Geschichte der Main-Weser-Bahn zwischen (From Condominium to Prussian State Railways—from the history of the Main-Weser Railway) 1866–1880". Zeitschrift des Vereins für Hessische Geschichte 107 (in German). pp. 291–314. 
  • Münzer, Lutz (2004). "Von der Main-Weser-Bahn zwischen 1866 und 1880 (From the history of the Main-Weser Railway 1866 and 1880)". Jahrbuch für Eisenbahngeschichte (Yearbook of Railway History) (in German). 36: 91–104. 
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