Maitreyi Devi

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Maitreyi Devi
MaitreyiDeviPic.jpg
Born (1914-09-01)1 September 1914
Chittagong Chattagram, British Raj, now Bangladesh
Died 4 February 1990(1990-02-04) (aged 75)
Occupation Poet, Novelist
Spouse(s) Dr. M.M. Sen
Parent(s) Surendranath Dasgupta (Father)
Himani Madhuri Rai (Mother)

Maitreyi Devi (or Maitreyī Devī) (1 September 1914 – 4 February 1990) was a Bengali-born Indian poet and novelist.

Life[edit]

Devi was born in 1914, she was the daughter of philosopher Surendranath Dasgupta and protegée of poet Rabindranath Tagore. She was married to quinologist dr. M.M. Sen.[1] She was the founder of the Council for the Promotion of Communal Harmony in 1964, and vice-president of the All-India Women’s Coordinating Council. Her first book of verse appeared when she was sixteen, with a preface by Rabindranath Tagore. She wrote Rabindranath--the man behind his poetry.[2] She was the basis for the main character in Romanian writer Mircea Eliade's 1933 novel Bengal Nights. In her Na Hanyate (English title, It Does Not Die: A Romance) novel, written as a response to Bengal Nights, Maitreyi Devi describes the romance and the cultural tensions resulted from it. Given the cultural constraints, she denies claims of a sexual affair between her and Eliade during the latter's sojourn in British India.[3][4]

In 1938 and 1939 she invited Rabindranath Tagore to stay in her and her husband's house in Mungpoo near Kalimpong, which later became the Rabindra Museum.[5]

Education[edit]

She graduated from the Jogamaya Devi College, an affiliated undergraduate women's college of the historic University of Calcutta, in Kolkata.[6]

Awards[edit]

She received Sahitya Akademi Award in the year 1976 for her novel Na Hanyate.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Better India. This Little Known Himalayan Village Was the Much-Loved Summer Retreat of Rabindranath Tagore (19 July 2016).
  2. ^ Devi, Maitreyi (1973). Rabindranath--the man behind his poetry. Sudhir Das at Nabajatak Printers.
  3. ^ Firdaus Azim, The Journal of Asian Studies, Association for Asian Studies, Vol. 55, 1996, pp. 1035-103
  4. ^ [1] A Terrible Hurt: The Untold Story behind the Publishing of Maitreyi Devi, by Ginu Kamani, accessed 30 January 2010
  5. ^ Mungpoo.org. Mungpoo and Kabi Guru Rabindranath Tagore, Museum.
  6. ^ History of the College