List of majority minority United States congressional districts

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For other sub-national areas where racial or ethnic minorities make up a majority of the population, see Majority minority.

A majority-minority district is an electoral district, such as a United States congressional district, in which the majority of the constituents in the district are racial or ethnic minorities (as opposed to white non-Hispanics). Whether a district is majority-minority is usually ascertained using United States Census data.

Majority-minority districts may be created to avoid or remedy violations of the Voting Rights Act of 1965's prohibitions on drawing redistricting plans that diminish the ability of a racial or language minority to elect its candidates of choice. In some instances, majority-minority districts may result from affirmative racial gerrymandering. The value of drawing district lines to create majority-minority districts is a matter of dispute both within and outside of minority communities. Some view majority-minority districts as a way to dilute the voting power of minorities and analogous to racial segregation; others favor majority-minority districts as ways to effectively ensure the election of minorities to legislative bodies, including the House of Representatives. Majority-minority districts have been the subject of legal cases examining the constitutionality of such districts, including Shaw v. Reno (1993), Miller v. Johnson (1995), and Bush v. Vera (1996).

African American majority[edit]

Population data are from 2015 Census American Community Survey One-year Estimates .[1] Districts in the table below reflect the 114th Congress.

There is only one African American majority congressional district that is represented by a Congressman self-identified as White Jewish, Rep. Steve Cohen (TN). All members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) except one are Democratic. Although the bylaws do not specify that membership is open only to black members of congress, prominent members of the CBC have publicly stated that they will not welcome non-black members. One Republican African American member of congress, Tim Scott has elected not to join the CBC. Steve Cohen has made his desire to join publicly known, but has not pursued membership over objections of the one of the founding members of the group. Keith Ellison is the first Muslim to be elected as a member of Congress. Stacey Plaskett, the non-voting delegate representing the Virgin Islands, is also a member of the Congressional Black Caucus.

Congressional Districts with African American Majorities or African American Congressmen
Rank Perc. State District 114th Congressional Black Caucus Total 2015 Afric. Amer.
1 66.3% Mississippi 2 Bennie G. Thompson 724,075 480,259
2 65.2% Tennessee 9 Steve Cohen[2] (Jewish) 705,879 460,533
3 63.6% Alabama 7 Terri A. Sewell 667,721 424,814
4 60.5% Louisiana 2 Cedric Richmond 791,393 478,785
5 59.4% Georgia 4 Henry C. "Hank" Johnson, Jr. 746,519 443,473
6 58.4% Georgia 13 David Scott 755,256 441,129
7 57.8% Georgia 5 John Lewis 736,978 425,941
8 57.6% South Carolina 6 James E. Clyburn 661,521 381,321
9 57.6% Pennsylvania 2 Dwight Evans 725,418 418,109
10 57.1% Virginia 3 Robert C. "Bobby" Scott 738,228 421,775
11 56.5% Illinois 2 Robin Kelly 702,674 396,854
12 56.1% Michigan 14 Brenda Lawrence 695,410 390,402
13 55.5% Michigan 13 John Conyers, Jr. 679,235 376,665
14 55.2% Florida 24 Frederica Wilson 745,862 411,387
15 54.0% Maryland 7 Elijah Cummings 729,001 393,457
16 53.7% Florida 20 Alcee L. Hastings 767,766 412,471
17 52.9% Maryland 4 Donna F. Edwards 745,629 394,713
18 52.7% New York 8 Hakeem Jeffries – Whip 769,795 405,603
19 52.7% Ohio 11 Marcia L. Fudge 704,489 370,986
20 52.6% Georgia 2 Sanford D. Bishop, Jr. 683,888 359,884
21 52.4% North Carolina 1 G.K. Butterfield – Chair 728,488 381,897
22 51.0% Illinois 1 Bobby L. Rush 717,447 366,000
23 50.3% New Jersey 10 Donald Payne, Jr. 764,684 384,341
24 49.7% New York 9 Yvette D. Clark – 1st Vice Chair 759,225 377,346
25 49.6% Florida 5 Corrine Brown 743,735 368,715
26 49.4% North Carolina 12 Alma Adams 793,964 392,085
27 49.3% New York 5 Gregory W. Meeks 779,896 384,325
28 49.2% Missouri 1 William "Lacy" Clay, Jr. 736,055 361,855
29 48.9% Illinois 7 Danny K. Davis 721,321 352,801
30 47.4% District of Columbia At large Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (non-voting member) 672,228 318,813
31 43.6% Texas 30 Eddie Bernice Johnson 754,382 329,176
32 38.0% Texas 9 Al Green 782,554 297,672
34 36.4% Texas 18 Sheila Jackson Lee 764,622 278,538
41 33.4% Wisconsin 4 Gwen Moore 716,998 239,546
43 32.7% Ohio 3 Joyce Beatty 767,295 250,694
50 29.1% Indiana 7 André Carson – Second Vice Chair 749,776 218,178
51 28.8% New York 13 Charles B. Rangel 790,434 227,395
66 23.7% California 37 Karen Bass – Secretary 722,781 171,348
68 22.6% California 43 Maxine Waters 744,444 168,304
72 21.9% Missouri 5 Emanuel Cleaver 757,920 165,779
91 18.2% New Jersey 12 Bonnie Watson Coleman 751,650 137,082
97 17.4% California 13 Barbara Lee 755,776 131,230
100 17.0% Minnesota 5 Keith Ellison (first Muslim) 707,578 120,100
106 16.4% Texas 33 Marc Veasey 740,323 121,258
395 1.8% Utah 4 Mia Love 762,014 13,433

Asian Pacific Islander majority, plurality, or significant minority[edit]

There are currently 45 members in the United States Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC). Unlike its sister groups, the Congressional Black Caucus and Congressional Hispanic Caucus, CAPAC includes members who are of API descent or represent large API populations.

The following table was lists the top 20 districts of API population.

Top 20 Congressional Districts ranked by people identified as Asian on census form
Rank Perc. State District Member Total 2015 Asian Amer.
1 52.9% California 17 Mike Honda 760,444 402,466
2 49.3% Hawaii 1 Colleen Hanabusa 705,773 348,082
3 40.4% New York 6 Grace Meng 744,562 300,927
4 38.2% California 27 Judy Chu 733,239 279,772
5 33.9% California 14 Jackie Speier 757,062 256,559
6 33.8% California 15 Eric Swalwell 771,800 260,823
7 32.5% California 12 Nancy Pelosi 749,688 243,713
8 31.0% California 39 Ed Royce 731,324 226,345
9 27.1% California 19 Zoe Lofgren 765,143 207,126
10 25.2% Hawaii 2 Tulsi Gabbard 725,830 183,186
11 24.5% California 45 Mimi Walters 771,550 189,250
12 22.8% California 18 Anna G. Eshoo 738,774 168,606
13 22.2% Washington 9 Adam Smith 728,262 161,938
14 22.0% California 47 Alan Lowenthal 718,339 158,377
15 20.3% California 13 Barbara Lee 755,776 153,406
16 19.6% California 34 Xavier Becerra 735,150 144,019
17 19.6% New York 10 Jerrold Nadler 728,323 142,560
18 19.2% California 52 Scott Peters 755,498 145,039
19 19.0% New Jersey 6 Frank Pallone, Jr. 753,711 143,071
20 18.6% New York 7 Nydia M. Velázquez 753,292 140,170

Hispanic and Latino majority[edit]

Congress has two groups for Hispanic congressmen. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus for Democrats, and Congressional Hispanic Conference for Republicans. Both groups permit delegates from territories and Senators as well as Congressmen. The Republican Conference also permits Associate members, for Representatives who are not Hispanic themselves, but have significant numbers of Hispanics in their districts. The Democratic Caucus does not permit similar associate members.

Congresswoman Loretta Sánchez has withdrawn from the Democratic caucus. Her sister Linda T. Sánchez, also a representative, withdrew temporarily, but has since rejoined.

The population data is for the 2010 census, but the congress will redistrict prior to the 2012 election. The percentages will no longer be accurate and new Hispanic Majority districts may be created.

When a non-Hispanic congressmen represents a Hispanic majority district, their name and when they began their term of service in congress is indicated. In some cases like Judy May Chu and Maxine Waters they are members of a significant non-Hispanic minority group inside the district. In other cases like Jaime Herrera Beutler or Gene Green the representative is simply a different ethnicity than many of their constituents.

Congressional Districts with Hispanic Majorities or Hispanic Congressmen
Rank Perc. State District Congressional Hispanic C… Total 2010 Hispanic
1 82.5% Texas 15 Caucus (Democrat) 787,124 649,297
2 81.5% Texas 16 Caucus (Democrat) 757,427 617,465
3 78.9% Texas 28 Caucus (Democrat) 851,824 672,129
4 78.7% California 34 Caucus (Democrat) 654,303 515,167
5 76.0% Texas 29 Gene Green (Jan 3, 1993) 677,032 514,861
6 75.6% Florida 21 Conference (Republican) 693,501 524,005
7 75.4% California 38 Caucus (Democrat) 641,410 483,490
8 73.5% Illinois 4 Caucus (Democrat) 601,156 442,018
9 73.2% Texas 27 Conference (Republican) 741,993 543,306
10 71.6% Florida 25 Conference (Republican) 807,176 577,998
11 71.5% Texas 20 Caucus (Democrat) 711,705 509,208
12 70.4% California 20 Caucus (Democrat) 744,350 523,705
13 69.4% California 43 Caucus (Democrat) 735,581 510,693
14 68.2% California 31 Caucus (Democrat) 611,336 417,183
15 67.6% California 47 Caucus (Democrat) - withdrawn 631,422 426,869
16 66.9% Florida 18 Conference (Republican) 712,790 476,672
17 66.5% New York 16 Caucus (Democrat) 693,819 461,580
18 66.5% California 39 Caucus (Democrat) 643,115 427,353
19 66.4% Texas 23 Conference (Republican) 847,651 562,913
20 64.2% California 32 Judy May Chu (Jul 19th 2009) 642,236 412,275
21 63.9% Arizona 4 Caucus (Democrat) 698,314 446,159
22 62.4% California 51 Bob Filner (Jan 3, 1993) 757,891 473,224
23 57.5% California 28 Howard Berman (Jan 3, 2003) 660,194 379,697
24 56.0% Arizona 7 Caucus (Democrat) 855,769 479,014
25 54.5% California 35 Maxine Waters (Jan 3, 1991) 662,413 360,796
26 52.7% California 18 Caucus (Democrat) 723,607 381,039
27 51.8% New Mexico 2 Conference (Republican) Associate 663,956 343,856
28 51.2% California 21 Conference (Republican) 784,176 401,194
29 50.6% New Jersey 13 Caucus (Democrat) 684,965 346,294
30 50.4% California 17 Sam Farr (Jun 8, 1993) 664,240 334,955
35 45.2% California 45 Conference (Republican) Associate 914,209 413,441
36 44.6% New York 12 Caucus (Democrat) 672,358 299,572
40 42.4% Texas 32 Conference (Republican) Associate 640,419 271,442
46 39.0% New Mexico 3 Caucus (Democrat) 693,284 270,117
57 33.8% Texas 19 Conference (Republican) Associate 698,137 235,973
107 20.8% Arizona 2 Conference (Republican) Associate 972,839 202,001
213 9.9% Idaho 1 Conference (Republican) 841,930 83,326
255 7.4% Washington 3 Conference (Republican) 779,348 57,604

African American plurality[edit]

Hispanic and Latino plurality[edit]

White plurality (majority minority)[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2015 American Community Survey". 
  2. ^ Bacon Jr, Perry (July 20, 2010). "Black Caucus lines up for white Steve Cohen over black rival". The Washington Post. 

External links[edit]