Makanda Ken McIntyre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Makanda Ken McIntyre
Birth nameKenneth Arthur McIntyre
Born(1931-09-07)September 7, 1931
Boston, Massachusetts
DiedJune 13, 2001(2001-06-13) (aged 69)
New York City
GenresJazz, avant-garde jazz
Occupation(s)Musician, teacher
InstrumentsSaxophone, multi-instrumentalist
Years active1960–2000
LabelsUnited Artists, SteepleChase

Makanda Ken McIntyre (born Kenneth Arthur McIntyre; also known as Ken McIntyre) (September 7, 1931 – June 13, 2001)[1] was an American jazz musician, composer and educator. In addition to his primary instrument, the alto saxophone, he played flute, bass clarinet, oboe, bassoon, double bass, drums, and piano.

Biography[edit]

McIntyre was born in Boston, Massachusetts, United States.[2] His father played mandolin.[3] McIntyre started his musical life on the bugle when he was eight years old, followed by piano.[3] In his teens he discovered the music of Charlie Parker and began playing saxophone at nineteen, then clarinet and flute two years later.[3] In 1953 he served in the Army and played saxophone and piano in Japan.[3]

After serving two years in the U.S. Army, he attended the Boston Conservatory[1] where he studied with Gigi Gryce, Charlie Mariano, and Andy McGhee.[3] In 1958 he received a degree in flute and composition with a master's degree the next year in composition.[3] He also received a doctorate (Ed.D.) in curriculum design from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1975.[3]

In 1960 he recorded as a leader with Eric Dolphy.[3] Beginning the next year, and for the next six years, he taught music in public schools.[3] He took oboe lessons in New York before playing with Bill Dixon, Jaki Byard, and the Jazz Composer's Orchestra.[3] Then he spent three years with pianist Cecil Taylor.[3] During the 1970s he recorded with Nat Adderley and Beaver Harris and in the 1980s with Craig Harris and Charlie Haden.[3]

In 1971, he founded the first African American Music program in America at the State University of New York College at Old Westbury, teaching for 24 years.[4] He also taught at Wesleyan University, Smith College, Central State University, Fordham University, and The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music.[3]

In the early 1990s, he changed his name to Makanda Ken McIntyre.[1] While performing in Zimbabwe, a stranger handed him a piece of paper with the word "Makanda" written on it; the word means "many skins" in the Ndebele language and "many heads" in Shona.[4]

McIntyre died of a heart attack in New York City, at the age of 69 on June 13, 2001.[1]

Discography[edit]

As leader[edit]

As sideman[edit]

With Charlie Haden

With Beaver Harris

  • Beautiful Africa (Soul Note, 1979)
  • Negcaumongus (Cadence, 1981)
  • Live at Nyon (Cadence, 1981)
  • Safe (Red, 1980)

With Archie Shepp, Bill Dixon

  • Quartet (FreeFactory, 2009 )
  • Bill Dixon 7-Tette/Archie Shepp and the New York Contemporary 5 (Savoy, 1964)

With others

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Yanow, Scott. "Ken McIntyre". AllMusic. Retrieved July 3, 2019.
  2. ^ Colin Larkin, ed. (1992). The Guinness Who's Who of Jazz (First ed.). Guinness Publishing. p. 268. ISBN 0-85112-580-8.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Feather, Leonard; Gitler, Ira (2007). The Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz. Oxford University Press. p. 452. ISBN 978-0-19-507418-5.
  4. ^ a b "BIOGRAPHY - Makanda Ken McIntyre: Jazz Master, Composer, Educator". Mkmjazz.com. Retrieved July 29, 2021.

External links[edit]