Malcolm Brown (Australian journalist)

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Malcolm Craig Brown (born 29 May 1947)[1] is an Australian journalist, editor and the co-author of books dealing with crime, forensic science, disasters and the Vietnam War.

Early life[edit]

Brown was born in Dubbo, New South Wales, and was the second son of a solicitor, Samuel Brown, and the grandson of a Methodist Minister, The Reverend E E Hynes. He was educated at state schools in Dubbo[2] before attending Newington College, Sydney, as a boarder in 1963 and 1964.[3] Brown's father had taught at Newington (1932–39) before becoming a legal practitioner and his grandfather was Chaplain at Newington whilst serving in the Stanmore parish.[4] In 1965, Brown entered the University of Sydney to study law and was a resident of Wesley College until 1968 when he went down from the University and became a cadet journalist on the Dubbo newspaper, The Daily Liberal.[5]

Military service[edit]

Brown was called up for National Service the following year and after Officer Training School graduated as a second lieutenant. He served as a platoon commander of the Third Training Battalion in Singleton, New South Wales.[6]

Writing career[edit]

Brown joined the staff of the Sydney Morning Herald in 1972 and retired on 30 August 2012 as a senior writer and editor. He covered the Azaria Chamberlain case for The Herald.[7] ABC TV's Australian Story covered his career on 29 October 2012 in an episode titled "A Man of His Word".[8]

Publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Newington College Register of Past Students 1863-1998 (Syd, 1999) pp 23
  2. ^ You're leaving tomorrow, Conscripts and correspondents caught up in the Vietnam War (Syd, 2007) pp 20
  3. ^ Newington College Register of Past Students 1863-1998 (Syd, 1999) pp 23
  4. ^ Newington Across the Years, A History of Newington College 1863 - 1998 (Syd, 1999) pp 98
  5. ^ You're leaving tomorrow, Conscripts and correspondents caught up in the Vietnam War (Syd, 2007) pp 32
  6. ^ You're leaving tomorrow, Conscripts and correspondents caught up in the Vietnam War (Syd, 2007) Endpapers
  7. ^ http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/maddy-disappearance-has-big-parallels/2007/09/12/1189276808723.html
  8. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/austory/content/2012/s3617977.htm