Malcolm Knox (author)

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For other people named Malcolm Knox, see Malcolm Knox (disambiguation).
Malcolm Knox
Born 1966
Occupation Journalist, author, novelist
Nationality Australian
Genre Literature, non-fiction, essay

Malcolm Knox (born 1966), is an Australian journalist and author.

Life and literary career[edit]

Malcolm Knox grew up in Sydney and studied in Sydney and Scotland. He has held a number of positions at the Sydney Morning Herald including chief cricket correspondent (1996–99), assistant sport editor (1999–2000) and literary editor (2002–06).[1] As literary editor, he broke the story of the fake Jordanian memoirist, Norma Khouri, which won him a Walkley Award (Investigative Journalism category) in 2004 (together with Caroline Overington).

He has written nineteen books including five novels.

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

Non-fiction[edit]

  • Taylor And Beyond (2000)
  • I Still Call Australia Home: The Qantas Story 1920–2005 (2005)
  • 1788 Words or Less: A short short history of Australia (2005)
  • Secrets of the Jury Room (2006)
  • Scattered: The Inside Story of Ice in Australia (2008)
  • On Obsession (2008)
  • The Greatest: The players, the moments, the matches 1993–2008 (2009)
  • The Captains (2010)
  • Fierce Focus: Greg Chappell (2011)
  • Bradman's War (2012)
  • Never a Gentlemen's Game (2012)
  • Boom: The Underground History of Australia, from Goldrush to GFC (2013)
  • Supermarket Monsters: The Price of Coles and Woolworths' Dominance (2015)
  • The Keepers (2015)
  • Phillip Hughes: The Official Biography (co-authored with Peter Lalor) (2015)

Other[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Malcolm Knox: Board of Directors Profile". Copyright Agency Limited. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  2. ^ "Author Search: Malcolm Knox". Worldcat. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  3. ^ "Author Profile: Malcolm Knox". Australian Literary Management. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  4. ^ "Malcolm Knox Profile". Random House. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  5. ^ "Previous Winners Database: Malcolm Knox". Walkley Awards. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  6. ^ "Media Release: Graham Perkin Award". The Age. 18 March 2005. Archived from the original on 1 April 2011. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  7. ^ "Previous Winners". Ned Kelly Awards. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  8. ^ "Malcolm Knox Profile". Griffith Review. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  9. ^ "Award Winners". The Monthly. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  10. ^ "Colin Roderick Award". Retrieved 12 February 2012. 

External links[edit]