Malcolm Muir (judge)

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Malcolm Muir
Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania
In office
1961–1976
Nominated by President Richard Nixon
Succeeded by Edwin Michael Kosik

Malcolm Muir (October 20, 1914 – July 22, 2011) was a United States federal judge.[1]

Born in Englewood, New Jersey, Muir received a B.A. from Lehigh University in 1935 and an LL.B. from Harvard Law School in 1938. He was in private practice in Williamsport, Pennsylvania from 1938 to 1942. He served in the United States Navy during World War II, from 1942 to 1945, achieving the rank of Lieutenant. He thereafter returned to private practice in Williamsport until 1970.

On September 28, 1970, Muir was nominated by President Richard Nixon to a new seat on the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania created by 84 Stat. 294. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on October 8, 1970, and received his commission on October 14, 1970. He assumed senior status on August 31, 1984.

Muir presided over the trial of Robert Budd Dwyer, the then Treasurer of Pennsylvania who was convicted in December 1986 of 11 counts of conspiracy, mail fraud, perjury and interstate transportation in aid of racketeering. He was scheduled to be sentenced by Muir on those charges on January 23, 1987. Dwyer called a press conference for the day before, January 22, where after stating his innocence, he killed himself in front of the gathered members of the media and his staff. He faced a possible sentence of up to 55 years' imprisonment and a $300,000 fine.

On July 22, 2011, Muir died at the age of 96.

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Legal offices
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania
1961–1976
Succeeded by
Edwin Michael Kosik