Mamble

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Mamble
Sun and Slipper, Mamble - geograph.org.uk - 464187.jpg
Sun and Slipper, Mamble
Mamble is located in Worcestershire
Mamble
Mamble
Location within Worcestershire
OS grid referenceSO689714
Civil parish
  • Mamble
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townKIDDERMINSTER
Postcode districtDY14
PoliceWest Mercia
FireHereford and Worcester
AmbulanceWest Midlands
UK Parliament
  • West Worcestershire
List of places
UK
England
Worcestershire
52°20′27″N 2°27′24″W / 52.3407°N 2.4566°W / 52.3407; -2.4566Coordinates: 52°20′27″N 2°27′24″W / 52.3407°N 2.4566°W / 52.3407; -2.4566

Mamble is a village and civil parish in the Malvern Hills District in the county of Worcestershire, England. It is located on the A456 between Bewdley and Tenbury Wells. Notable buildings include the 13th century sandstone church and the nearby 17th century Sun & Slipper Inn.[1]

History[edit]

Roman remains have been found in the area at Sodington Hall, and at the time of the Domesday Book the settlement was known as Mamele. In subsequent years Mamble parish was in the lower division of Doddingtree Hundred.[2] The parish church of St John Baptist dates from about 1200 and has a wooden bell turret.[3] The brick-built side chapel of the Blount family, formerly from Sodington Hall, was added in the 16th century but was unroofed in the mid-20th century and is now in ruins.

Although agriculture was always a major industry for the local inhabitants, coal mining was also important from the second half of the 18th century onwards, and the last local pits to the south-east of the village remained in operation until 1944.[4] In the 1790s the Leominster Canal was opened in the area, which allowed coal to be brought down from the colliery by tramway and carried to Tenbury Wells and Herefordshire, but the canal was unprofitable and was closed in 1859.[5]

There was once a greyhound coursing club in the village in the mid-19th century when races were run for a silver cup.[6][7] But if its name is remembered today, it is chiefly as the title of a 1915 poem by John Drinkwater speculating about what lay at the end of a turning that he never took:

The finger-post says Mamble,
and that is all I know,
of the narrow road to Mamble.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mamble Parish website
  2. ^ Worcestershire Family History Guidebook, Vanessa Morgan, 2011, p20 The History Press, Stroud, Gloucestershire.
  3. ^ Historic England
  4. ^ David Poyner & Robert Evans, "Mamble Colliery", SCMC Journal #4
  5. ^ Ronald Russell, Lost Canals of England and Wales, David & Charles, 1971, pp.101-5
  6. ^ Thacker's Coursers Annual, 1849
  7. ^ Edward C. Ash, Ruth Fawcett, The Book of the Greyhound
  8. ^ Drinkwater, John, Selected Poems of John Drinkwater, pp.31-32. 'Mamble' (From Swords and Ploughshares, 1915) published 1922 Sidgwick & Jackson, Ltd. London. Retrieved 21 June 2009