Mammals of Grand Teton National Park

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American marten

There are at least 16 large and 45 small mammal species known to occur in Grand Teton National Park. Species are listed by common name, scientific name, and relative abundance.[1]

Legend[edit]

  • a – Abundant – likely to be seen in appropriate habitat and season.
  • c – Common – frequently seen in appropriate habitat and season.
  • u – Uncommon – seen irregularly in appropriate habitat and season.
  • r – Rare – unexpected even in appropriate habitat and season.
  • x – Accidental – out of known range, or reported only once or twice.
  •  ? – Questionable – verification unavailable.

Large mammals[edit]

Bears[edit]

Black bear

Order: Carnivora Family: Ursidae

Canines[edit]

Order: Carnivora Family: Canidae

Cats[edit]

Canada lynx

Order: Carnivora Family: Felidae

Deer[edit]

Order: Artiodactyla Family: Cervidae

Pronghorns[edit]

Order: Artiodactyla Family: Antilocapridae

Cattle[edit]

American bison

Order: Artiodactyla Family: Bovidae

Small mammals[edit]

Raccoons[edit]

Order: Carnivora Family: Procyonidae

Badgers and weasels[edit]

Order: Carnivora Family: Mustelidae

Skunks[edit]

Order: Carnivora Family: Mephitidae

Hares and rabbits[edit]

Order: Lagomorpha Family: Leporidae

Pikas[edit]

Order: Lagomorpha Family: Ochotonidae

Shrews[edit]

Order: Soricomorpha Family: Soricidae

Beaver[edit]

Order: Rodentia Family: Castoridae

  • Beaver, Castor canadensis, a

Squirrels[edit]

Order: Rodentia Family: Sciuridae

Pocket gophers[edit]

Order: Rodentia Family: Geomyidae

Mice[edit]

Order: Rodentia Family: Cricetidae

Jumping mice[edit]

Order: Rodentia Family: Dipodidae

Muskrats, voles and woodrats[edit]

Order: Rodentia Family: Cricetidae

Porcupines[edit]

Order: Rodentia Family: Erethizontidae

Bats[edit]

Order: Chiroptera Family: Vespertilionidae

Further reading[edit]

  • Burde, John H.; George A. Feldhamer (2005). Mammals of the National Parks. Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0-8018-8097-1. 
  • Craighead, Karen (1991). Large Mammals of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks : How to Know Them, Where to See Them. Yellowstone Association for Natural Science History. 
  • Streubel, Donald P. (1995). Small Mammals of the Yellowstone Ecosystem. Boulder, CO: Robert Rineharts. ISBN 0-911797-59-9. 

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mammal Finding Guide-National Park (Report). Grand Teton National Park, National Park Service. Retrieved 2011-06-14.