Manalapan Township, New Jersey

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Manalapan Township, New Jersey
Township of Manalapan
Rolling hills of Monmouth Battlefield and farmland
Rolling hills of Monmouth Battlefield and farmland
Motto(s): 
A great place to live[1]
Map of Manalapan Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Manalapan Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Manalapan Township, New Jersey Interactive map of Manalapan Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Manalapan Township, New Jersey
Interactive map of Manalapan Township, New Jersey
Manalapan Township is located in Monmouth County, New Jersey
Manalapan Township
Manalapan Township
Location in Monmouth County
Manalapan Township is located in New Jersey
Manalapan Township
Manalapan Township
Location in New Jersey
Manalapan Township is located in the United States
Manalapan Township
Manalapan Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°16′56″N 74°20′48″W / 40.282353°N 74.346564°W / 40.282353; -74.346564Coordinates: 40°16′56″N 74°20′48″W / 40.282353°N 74.346564°W / 40.282353; -74.346564[2][3]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMonmouth
IncorporatedMarch 9, 1848
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorSusan Cohen (R, term ends December 31, 2022)[4][5]
 • AdministratorTara L. Lovrich[6]
 • Municipal clerkShari Rose[7]
Area
 • Total30.88 sq mi (79.99 km2)
 • Land30.65 sq mi (79.39 km2)
 • Water0.23 sq mi (0.60 km2)  0.75%
 • Rank85th of 565 in state
8th of 53 in county[2]
Elevation102 ft (31 m)
Population
 • Total40,905
 • Rank58th of 566 in state
4th of 53 in county[11]
 • Density1,270.0/sq mi (490.3/km2)
  • Rank354th of 566 in state
43rd of 53 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)732/848[13]
FIPS code3402542990[2][14][15]
GNIS feature ID0882117[2][16]
Websitewww.mtnj.org

Manalapan Township (/mənæləpɪn/, mə-NAL-ə-pin) is a township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. The township is centrally located within the Raritan Valley region and is a part of the New York Metropolitan Area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 38,872,[17][18][19] representing an increase of 5,449 (+16.3%) from the 33,423 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 6,707 (+25.1%) from the 26,716 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

The name "Manalapan" is derived from a word in the Lenape language that would mean either "land of good bread", "good land to settle upon",[21][22] "good bread"[23] or "covered swamp with edible roots".[24]

History[edit]

The historic Millhurst Mill

The Battle of Monmouth was fought in 1778 on land that is now part of Manalapan and Freehold townships. Monmouth Battlefield State Park occupies 2,928 acres (1,185 ha) in the two townships.[21]

Manalapan Township was formed by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 9, 1848, from portions of Freehold Township. Englishtown was formed as a borough from portions of Manalapan on January 4, 1888, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day.[25]

Geography[edit]

Manalapan Brook flows through the township

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 30.88 square miles (79.99 km2), including 30.65 square miles (79.39 km2) of land and 0.23 square miles (0.60 km2) of water (0.75%).[2][3] The township has an elevation of 82 feet (25 m).

The township completely surrounds Englishtown, making it part of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.[26] The township borders the municipalities of Freehold Township, Marlboro Township and Millstone Township in Monmouth County; and Monroe Township and Old Bridge Township in Middlesex County.[27][28][29]

During the autumn months, hayrides and apple picking (as pictured here) are among many popular recreational activities for township residents, along with nearby residents traveling from North Jersey and New York

Yorketown (with a 2010 Census population of 6,535[30]) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Manalapan Township.[31][32][33]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Cahills Corners, Clarks Mills, Elton, Gordons Corner, Lafayette Mills, Millhurst, Monmouth Heights,[citation needed] Oakland Mills, Smithburg, Taylors Mills, Tennent, Tracey, Whittier Oaks[citation needed] and Woodville.[34]

Ecology[edit]

According to the A. W. Kuchler U.S. potential natural vegetation types, Manalapan Township, New Jersey would have an Appalachian Oak (104) vegetation type with an Eastern Hardwood Forest (25) vegetation form.[35]

Demographics[edit]

Tennent Presbyterian Church and cemetery in the historic village of Tennent
Historical population
Census Pop.
18501,910
18602,37424.3%
18702,286−3.7%
18802,175*−4.9%
18902,002−8.0%
19001,435−28.3%
19101,375−4.2%
19201,080−21.5%
19301,46435.6%
19401,90029.8%
19503,13765.1%
19603,99027.2%
197014,049252.1%
198018,91434.6%
199026,71641.2%
200033,42325.1%
201038,87216.3%
202040,9055.2%
Population sources:
1850-1920[36] 1850-1870[37]
1850[38] 1870[39] 1880-1890[40]
1890-1910[41] 1910-1930[42]
1930-1990[43] 2000[44][45] 2010[17][18][19] 2020[10]
*= Lost territory in previous decade[25]

2010 Census[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 38,872 people, 13,263 households, and 10,663 families in the township. The population density was 1,270.0 per square mile (490.3/km2). There were 13,735 housing units at an average density of 448.8 per square mile (173.3/km2). The racial makeup was 88.55% (34,423) White, 2.38% (925) Black or African American, 0.05% (18) Native American, 6.90% (2,682) Asian, 0.02% (7) Pacific Islander, 0.94% (364) from other races, and 1.17% (453) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.66% (2,202) of the population.[17]

Of the 13,263 households, 39.6% had children under the age of 18; 70.2% were married couples living together; 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present and 19.6% were non-families. Of all households, 17.3% were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.32.[17]

25.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 21.8% from 25 to 44, 32.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.7 years. For every 100 females, the population had 93.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 89.9 males.[17]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $103,970 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,322) and the median family income was $115,292 (+/- $5,344). Males had a median income of $85,086 (+/- $5,699) versus $51,695 (+/- $3,038) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,049 (+/- $1,717). About 2.5% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.7% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[46]

2000 Census[edit]

Super-regional shopping mall Freehold Raceway Mall is located in neighboring Freehold Township. It is a major shopping destination for Manalapan residents

As the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 33,423 people, 10,781 households, and 9,002 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,084.6 people per square mile (418.7/km2). There were 11,066 housing units at an average density of 359.1 per square mile (138.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 91.81% White, 1.99% African American, 0.03% Native American, 4.53% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.53% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.54% of the population. Manalapan has large Italian and Jewish communities.[44][45]

There were 10,781 households, out of which 47.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.9% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.5% were non-families. 14.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.09 and the average family size was 3.45.[44][45]

In the township the population was spread out, with 30.3% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 11.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.5 males.[44][45]

The median income for a household in the township was $83,575, and the median income for a family was $94,112. Males had a median income of $72,198 versus $39,921 for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,142. About 3.2% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 5.7% of those age 65 or over.[44][45]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Monmouth Battlefield State Park entrance
Families at Monmouth Battlefield, a popular recreational area for the township and surrounding area

Manalapan's Recreation Center covers 162 acres (66 ha), offering two handball courts, nine softball/baseball fields, a fitness trail, two football fields (one turf), nine football/soccer fields, two street hockey courts, three tot lots, six basketball courts, six tennis courts, two bocce courts, two sand volleyball courts, a nine-hole disc golf course, a small water park, concession stand, two picnic areas, two maintenance buildings, two shelter buildings and a headquarters building.[47]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Manalapan Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 564) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[48] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[8][49] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor for one year.[50]

As of 2022, members of the Manalapan Township Committee are Mayor Susan Cohen (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2023; term as mayor ends 2022), Deputy Mayor Mary Ann Musich (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2022), Barry Jacobson (R, 2024), John P. "Jack" McNaboe (R, 2023) and Eric Nelson (R, 2022).[4][51][52][53][54]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Manalapan Township is located in the 4th Congressional District[55] and is part of New Jersey's 12th state legislative district.[18][56][57] Prior to the 2010 Census, Manalapan Township had been split between the 6th Congressional District and the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[58]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Chris Smith (R, Hamilton Township).[59][60] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[61] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[62][63]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 12th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Samuel D. Thompson (R, Old Bridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Robert D. Clifton (R, Matawan) and Ronald S. Dancer (R, Plumsted Township).[64]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[65] As of 2020, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2022; term as freeholder director ends 2021),[66] Freeholder Deputy Director Susan M. Kiley (R, Hazlet Township, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2021; term as deputy freeholder director ends 2021),[67] Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township, 2020),[68] Nick DiRocco (R, Wall Township, 2022),[69] and Patrick G. Impreveduto (R, Holmdel Township, 2020)[70].

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon (R, 2020; Ocean Township),[71][72] Sheriff Shaun Golden (R, 2022; Howell Township),[73][74] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (R, 2021; Middletown Township).[75][76]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 26,256 registered voters in Manalapan Township, of which 6,925 (26.4%) were registered as Democrats, 4,439 (16.9%) were registered as Republicans and 14,875 (56.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 17 voters registered as members of other parties.[77]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 54.2% of the vote (9,949 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 44.8% (8,224 votes), and other candidates with 0.9% (169 votes), among the 18,449 ballots cast by the township's 27,734 registered voters (107 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 66.5%.[78][79] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 51.9% of the vote (10,150 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 45.9% (8,984 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (160 votes), among the 19,553 ballots cast by the township's 26,582 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.6%.[80] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 52.2% of the vote (9,254 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 46.2% (8,185 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (96 votes), among the 17,730 ballots cast by the township's 23,926 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.1.[81]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 73.0% of the vote (7,640 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 25.7% (2,688 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (132 votes), among the 10,583 ballots cast by the township's 28,056 registered voters (123 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 37.7%.[82][83] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 61.9% of the vote (7,581 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 32.6% (3,995 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 4.4% (536 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (69 votes), among the 12,251 ballots cast by the township's 26,168 registered voters, yielding a 46.8% turnout.[84]

Education[edit]

Manalapan High School located on the corner of Church Lane and Englishtown-Freehold Road

Public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District, which also serves children from Englishtown.[85] Manalapan and Englishtown formally joined together as a regional elementary school district in 1963, with an initial enrollment of 1,140 students; The student body is primarily from Manalapan Township, which accounts for about 95% of enrollment, with Englishtown students accounting for the remaining 5%.[86] As of the 2019–20 school year, the district, comprised of eight schools, had an enrollment of 4,910 students and 408.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.0:1.[87] Schools in the district (with 2019–20 enrollment from the National Center for Education Statistics[88]) are John I. Dawes Early Learning Center[89] with 365 students in PreK and K, Clark Mills School[90] with 491 students in grades 1-5, Lafayette Mills School[91] with 489 students in grades 1-5, Milford Brook School[92] with 523 students in grades K-5, Taylor Mills School[93] with 600 students in grades K-5, Wemrock Brook School[94] with 626 students in grades 1-5, Pine Brook School[95] with 563 students in sixth grade and Manalapan-Englishtown Middle School[96] with 1,227 students in grades 7 and 8.[97][98] The district is overseen by a nine-member board of education, which sets policy and oversees the fiscal and educational operation of the district;[99][100] Seats on the board are allocated based on population, with eight seats assigned to Manalapan Township.[101]

Students from Manalapan Township in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend either Freehold Township High School or Manalapan High School as part of the Freehold Regional High School District (FRHSD), with the school attended based on the student's address.[102][103] The Freehold Regional High School District also serves students from Colts Neck Township, Englishtown, Farmingdale, Freehold Borough, Freehold Township, Howell Township and Marlboro Township.[104][105] of the 2019–20 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,879 students and 122.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.3:1[106] and As of the 2019–20 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 2,029 students and 133.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.2:1.[107] The FRHSD board of education has nine members, who are elected to three-year terms from each of the constituent districts.[108] Each member is allocated a fraction of a vote that totals to nine points, with Manalapan Township allocated one member, who has 1.4 votes.[109]

Public high school students in Manalapan and all of Monmouth County also have the option of attending one of the Monmouth County Vocational School District's five career academies. Manalapan’s academy is the Science and Engineering Program.[110]

Crime[edit]

Manalapan's crime rate per 1,000 residents had reached a low of 8.4 in 2003 (in data since 1996). After reaching a peak of 12.1 in 2007, the rate dropped each subsequent year, reaching 10.4 in 2010 before an uptick to 10.8 in 2011. The violent crime rate per 1,000 had reached a low of 0.3 in 2005, before climbing to 0.8 in 2007, then declining or remaining level in each succeeding year, reaching a rate of 0.4 in 2011.[111]

In 2008, seven residents of Manalapan were arrested on money laundering and drug trafficking charges for their involvement in an international drug ring bringing in a net of $1 million per month.[112]

Community[edit]

Manalapan Under the Stars in 2010

Manalapan landmarks include the headquarters facility of the Monmouth County Library, the Manalapan Recreation Center, and the battlefield for the Battle of Monmouth. Manalapan Under the Stars, the township's community celebration featuring rides, concerts, fireworks, and other activities, is held annually at the Recreation Center.[113] Performers featured in the series have included Herman's Hermits Starring Peter Noone and Tommy James and the Shondells.

The headquarters of the Monmouth County Library system are located in Manalapan

In 2004, Manalapan was rated the second-hottest town on the East Coast by Money magazine.[114]

On May 27, 2001, Manalapan was struck by a tornado rated F2 on the Fujita scale, causing over $1 million in damage. The 200-foot-wide (61 m) tornado had winds of up to 120 miles per hour (190 km/h) over a path of 1.5 miles (2.4 km).[115]

Infrastructure[edit]

Public safety[edit]

Emergency services[edit]

The Township of Manalapan has multiple emergency service departments. The following are the emergency service provided in Manalapan Township:

Police[edit]

The Manalapan Township police department is a large force composed of 55 officers.[116] The force has two major divisions; operations and administration.[117] The Operations Division is headed by Deputy Chief Leonard Maltese, and the Administration Division is headed by Deputy Chief Thomas Mantle. On February 8, 2021, Edward Niesz was promoted as Chief of Manalapan Township Police Department, succeeding former Chief Michael Fountain; Fountain had served with the department for 27 years, the final four-plus years as Police Chief.[118][119]

Fire Prevention[edit]
Fire squads[edit]

Manalapan Township has three volunteer fire companies:

  • Manalapan Township Fire Company #1, founded in 1949, is located on Sweetmans Lane and serves the southern portion of the township[120]
  • Manalapan Township Fire Company #2: Gordons Corner Fire Company (founded 1962) is located in the heavily suburbanized community of Yorketown in the northern portion of the township.[121] It has two branches that serves the community, one located on Tennent Road, and another on Pease Road[122]
  • Englishtown Fire Department is located in neighboring Englishtown and serves central portions the township.[123]
First aid squads[edit]

Englishtown-Manalapan First Aid Squad (EMFAS) is a regional pre-hospital emergency care service for Englishtown and Manalapan residents. The organization was founded in 1941, and is located in Englishtown.[124]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

US 9 in Manalapan Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 192.19 miles (309.30 km) of roadways, of which 164.98 miles (265.51 km) were maintained by the municipality, 19.15 miles (30.82 km) by Monmouth County and 8.06 miles (12.97 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[125]

Manalapan hosts U.S. Route 9 in the northeast, and State Route 33 passes through near the southern part of the township. Major county routes, such as 522 and 527 traverse through the municipality, while 524 and 537 goes along the southeast border of the township.

Other major roads that are accessible outside the township are the Garden State Parkway in bordering Old Bridge, Interstate 195 in bordering Millstone Township, and the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) in East Windsor Township (Exit 8) and bordering Monroe Township (Exit 8A).

Public transportation[edit]

Rail[edit]

In the 19th & 20th centuries, Englishtown Borough and Manalapan Township had a major railway in the area, which was the Freehold and Jamesburg Agricultural Railroad. This railway was owned and operated by the Camden & Amboy Railroad Company (C&A), in which surveying for the line began on September 8, 1851, grading began on October 19, 1852, and the first track was laid on April 4, 1853.[126] The first section of line was opened on July 18, 1853.[127] The establishment of the Freehold & Jamesburg Agricultural Railroad allowed this region to become a transportation hub.[128] The Freehold and Jamesburg Railroad was abandoned by the early 1930s. A 2.8-mile long (4.5 km) portion of the former railroad's right-of-way was later approved to be sold by the New Jersey Board of Public Utility Commissioners (PUC) to Jersey Central Power & Light Company in 1966, with occasional freight service still being utilized through the Freehold Industrial Track.

The Monmouth Ocean Middlesex Line is a proposal by New Jersey Transit to restore passenger railway service to the region. The township would be a potential stop for the 'MOM' Line.[129][130][131][132]

As of now, the nearest train stations to the township are Metropark in Iselin, Metuchen, New Brunswick, and Princeton Junction on the Northeast Corridor Line.

Busing[edit]

NJ Transit currently provides bus service on the 139 route to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, to Newark and Jersey City on the 64 and 67 routes, and local service on the 307 route.[133]

Aviation[edit]

The nearest commercial airports are Trenton-Mercer Airport which serves several domestic destinations via Frontier Airlines, located 25 miles (40 km) west; and Newark Liberty International Airport which serves as a major hub for United Airlines, 32 miles (51 km) north.

Healthcare[edit]

Manalapan Township is served by CentraState Healthcare System, which is affiliated with Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, located in neighboring Freehold Township. The regional hospital is a 287-bed medical facility. CentraState Healthcare system also provides healthcare through its various family practices in communities across western Monmouth and southern Middlesex counties in central New Jersey. The next closest hospitals to the township are the Old Bridge Division of Raritan Bay Medical Center in nearby Old Bridge Township, Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center in nearby Plainsboro Township, and Saint Peter's University Hospital and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in nearby New Brunswick.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Manalapan Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Home page, Manalapan Township. Accessed February 24, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  3. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Mayor & Township Committee, Manalapan Township. Accessed May 2, 2022.
  5. ^ 2022 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed March 1, 2022.
  6. ^ Administration, Manalapan Township. Accessed April 8, 2022.
  7. ^ Municipal Clerk, Manalapan Township. Accessed April 8, 2022.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 62.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Manalapan, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  10. ^ a b QuickFacts Manalapan township, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 3, 2022.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 5, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Manalapan, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 8, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Manalapan, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  14. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Manalapan township, Monmouth County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 24, 2012.
  18. ^ a b c Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  19. ^ a b Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Manalapan township Archived March 4, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed February 24, 2012.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 8, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Wikoff, Lydia. "Manalapan Spanning Three Centuries", Manalapan Township. Accessed September 4, 2015. "In researching it could not be found how the decision to name it Manalapan came about. The name Manalapan translate from the Lenape Indian Words 'manel' for drinking and 'paune' for bread meant good land to settle upon, for the Indians.... You are well aware that Manalapan was the site of the Battle of Monmouth, a Revolutionary War engagement held on June 28, 1778 involving 30,000 British and Continental troops. On the two hundredth anniversary of the Battle, in 1978, the State opened the 1,520 acre Monmouth Battlefield State Park. Eighty percent of the Park is in Manalapan Township."
  22. ^ Chang, Kathy; and Kesten, Karen L. "Birth of a town" Archived December 12, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, News Transcript, December 16, 2009. Accessed September 23, 2013. "Manalapan is said to derive its name from the Lenape word for 'land of good bread or good land to settle upon.' Englishtown was a part of Manalapan. The Monmouth Battlefield lands are 80 percent in Manalapan."
  23. ^ Gannett, Henry. The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States, p. 19. United States Government Printing Office, 1905. Accessed September 4, 2015.
  24. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 4, 2015.
  25. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 181. Accessed February 24, 2012.
  26. ^ DeMarco, Megan. "Voters to decide whether to merge two Princetons into one", The Star-Ledger, November 3, 2011. Accessed January 8, 2017. "There are 22 sets of 'doughnut towns' in New Jersey, those where one town wraps around the other town". Note that following voter approval of the Princeton merger, 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" remain.
  27. ^ Areas touching Manalapan Township, MapIt. Accessed February 26, 2020.
  28. ^ Regional Location Map, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 26, 2020.
  29. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  30. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Yorketown CDP, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed February 24, 2012.
  31. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Monmouth County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 6, 2012.
  32. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
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  50. ^ Form of Gov/Org., Manalapan Township. Accessed May 2, 2022. "Manalapan operates under the township form of municipal government.... In the township form, a plurality (the largest number of votes, but not necessarily a majority) is sufficient to elect a township committee member. The township committee consists of five members elected at large, and the members serve a term of three years. No more than two members are up for election in any one year, and every third year only one member will be up for election."
  51. ^ 2022 Municipal Data Sheet, Manalapan Township. Accessed May 2, 2022.
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  60. ^ Biography, Congressman Chris Smith. Accessed January 3, 2019. "Elected in 1980, U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R-Hamilton, N.J.) is currently in his 19th two-year term in the U.S. House of Representatives, and serves residents of the Fourth Congressional District of New Jersey."
  61. ^ U.S. Sen. Cory Booker cruises past Republican challenger Rik Mehta in New Jersey, PhillyVoice. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  62. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  63. ^ Home, sweet home: Bob Menendez back in Hudson County. nj.com. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
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  67. ^ Freeholder Susan M. Kiley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
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  70. ^ Freeholder Patrick Impreveduto, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 18, 2018.
  71. ^ The Monmouth County Clerk, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  72. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  73. ^ About Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  74. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  75. ^ About the Surrogate, Monmouth County New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  76. ^ Members List: Surrogates, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  77. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 5, 2012.
  78. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Monmouth County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  79. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Monmouth County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  80. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 5, 2012.
  81. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 5, 2012.
  82. ^ "Governor - Monmouth County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
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  85. ^ Manalapan-Englishtown Board of Education District Policy 0110- Identification, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed March 23, 2020. "Purpose The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Kindergarten through 8 in the Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Composition The Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Manalapan Township and Englishtown Borough."
  86. ^ A History Lesson with a Future, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021. "Manalapan and Englishtown formally joined as a regional elementary district in 1963. That year, the population of the district was 1140..... As of January 2017, the district had 5085 students: 4811 from Manalapan and 274 from Englishtown."
  87. ^ District information for Manalapan-Englishtown Regional Schools School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2021.
  88. ^ School Data for the Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2021.
  89. ^ John I. Dawes Early Learning Center, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  90. ^ Clark Mills School, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  91. ^ Lafayette Mills School, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  92. ^ Milford Brook School, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  93. ^ Taylor Mills School, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  94. ^ Wemrock Brook School, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  95. ^ Pine Brook School, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  96. ^ Manalapan-Englishtown Middle School, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  97. ^ School Hours, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed September 1, 2021.
  98. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 24, 2016.
  99. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of the Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education, for year ending June 30, 2018. Accessed March 1, 2020. "Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District ('District') is organized under the Constitution of the State of New Jersey. The District operates under a locally elected Board form of government consisting of nine members elected to three-year terms, which are staggered.... It is located in Monmouth County and provides education for all of Manalapan-Englishtown Regional’s students in grades K through 8."
  100. ^ Board Members, Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District. Accessed March 23, 2020.
  101. ^ Rosman, Mark. "Manalapan-Englishtown school board reorganizes for 2020", News Transcript, January 10, 2020. "The school board has nine members – eight residents of Manalapan (Bruno, Parisi, Kane, Urgo, Dotty Porcaro, Brian Graime, Janet Lewis and Joanne Schechter) and one resident of Englishtown (Lori Semel)."
  102. ^ FRHSD Attendance Boundaries; Which High School Will My Child Attend? Archived September 28, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, Freehold Regional High School District. Accessed January 15, 2020. "The following is a list of streets, by municipality, that are assigned to a Freehold Regional District high school outside of their hometown."
  103. ^ Manalapan High School 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 29, 2016. "Manalapan High School is a fully accredited comprehensive high school serving a community of nearly 39,000 residents living primarily in the Township of Manalapan and the Borough of Englishtown. One of six high schools in the Freehold Regional High School District, which opened in 1971, Manalapan High School has enjoyed an outstanding reputation throughout the state for its academic and extracurricular programs."
  104. ^ Freehold Regional High School District 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed February 26, 2020. "The Freehold Regional High School District, the largest regional high school District in New Jersey, has six high schools with over 11,000 students and over 1,500 employees and spans 200 square miles. District members include the townships of Colts Neck, Freehold, Howell, Manalapan, and Marlboro, and the boroughs of Englishtown, Farmingdale, and Freehold."
  105. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for Freehold Regional High School District, New Jersey Department of Education, June 30, 2018. Accessed February 26, 2020. "Geographically, the District is comprised of the Townships of Colts Neck, Freehold, Howell, Manalapan and Marlboro and the Boroughs of Englishtown, Farmingdale and Freehold. Established in 1953, the District's total area is 198 square miles."
  106. ^ School data for Manalapan High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2021.
  107. ^ School data for Freehold Township High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2021.
  108. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of the Freehold Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education, June 30, 2018. Accessed February 26, 2020. "The Freehold Regional High School District is a Type II District located in Monmouth County, New Jersey. The School District is an instrumentality of the State of New Jersey, established to function as an educational institution. The Board of Education of the Freehold Regional High School District, comprised of nine elected individuals, is the primary governing authority of the District."
  109. ^ Vilacoba, Karl. "Marlboro files challenge to FRHSD voting system", Central Jersey Archives, September 26, 2002. Accessed January 19, 2020. "Under the current weighted FRHSD vote apportionment, a nine-point voting system is in place. Howell has two board members for a combined 2 voting points; Marlboro, Manalapan and Freehold Township each have one vote worth 1.4 points; Colts Neck and Freehold Borough each have one vote worth 0.9 points; and Englishtown and Farmingdale each have one vote worth 0.5 voting points."
  110. ^ Career Academies, Monmouth County Vocational School District. Accessed September 17, 2014.
  111. ^ New Jersey Crime Reports: Manalapan Township, Asbury Park Press. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  112. ^ Diamant, Jeff. "Seven arrested in Monmouth County drug bust", The Star-Ledger, June 2, 2008. Accessed April 12, 2011. "Based at the multi-million dollar Manalapan home of its alleged leader, it operated out of 'quiet suburbia' but had contacts worldwide, said Gerard McAleer, special agent in charge of the DEA's New Jersey division."
  113. ^ Staff. "Manalapan Under the Stars returns June 12", News Transcript, June 2, 2010. Accessed October 19, 2014.
  114. ^ Benjamin, David. "Money ranks Manalapan, Marlboro among top towns, News Transcript, December 24, 2003. Accessed January 26, 2018. "According to the January 2004 issue of Money magazine, Manalapan has been ranked as the No. 2 community in which to live in the eastern third of the United States with a population of less than 100,000 residents."
  115. ^ Saulny, Susan. "It's Official: Sunday Storm In New Jersey Was a Tornado", The New York Times, May 29, 2001. Accessed August 6, 2012. "A storm that ravaged Manalapan, N.J., on Sunday night was a tornado, National Weather Service meteorologists determined yesterday.... Assessments of damage to buildings in Manalapan, a township in central New Jersey, placed wind speed at 120 miles per hour, and determined that the twister was 200 feet wide and traveled a path about a mile and a half long, said John Quagliariello, a meteorologist in the weather service's office in Mount Holly, N.J."
  116. ^ Community, Manalapan Township Police. Accessed March 18, 2022. "The department is currently staffed with fifty five sworn officers which is supplemented by a civilian staff of three full time employees."
  117. ^ About the Department, Manalapan Township Police Department. Accessed March 18, 2022.
  118. ^ Home Page, Manalapan Township Police Department. Accessed March 18, 2022.
  119. ^ Rosman, Mark. "Niesz promoted to chief of Manalapan Police Department", News Transcript, February 8, 2021. Accessed March 18, 2022. "Edward Niesz, who has served in the Manalapan Police Department for 24 years, has been promoted to the rank of police chief. Niesz succeeds Michael Fountain, who retired at the end of January after serving 27 years with the department. Fountain became Manalapan’s police chief on April 1, 2016."
  120. ^ About, Manalapan Township Fire Company #1. Accessed February 9, 2022. "The Manalapan Township Fire Company #1 has provided community-based fire service since 1949."
  121. ^ History, Gordons Corner Fire Company. Accessed February 9, 2022. "In the spring of 1962 a small group of new Manalapan residents from Holiday North met to discuss the need for fire protection in the north west section of the township. The area was growing rapidly and there were men willing to serve the needs of their community. In March of 1962 the charter for the Gordons Corner Fire Company was signed by both new and long-time residents of Manalapan."
  122. ^ Contact Us, Gordons Corner Fire Company. Accessed February 9, 2022.
  123. ^ Hompe Page, Borough of Englishtown, Fire District #1. Accessed February 9, 2022.
  124. ^ About Us, Englishtown Manalapan First Aid Squad. Accessed February 9, 2022.
  125. ^ Monmouth County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  126. ^ "History of Steam Railroads of Monmouth County; Paper Read by George V. Sneden at Meeting of Monmouth County Historical Society". The Daily Standard. Red Bank, NJ. May 31, 1907. p. 6 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  127. ^ "The Freehold & Jamesburg Agricultural Railroad". Monmouth Democrat. Freehold, NJ. July 15, 1858. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  128. ^ "History of South Brunswick". The Central New Jersey Home News. New Brunswick, NJ. June 15, 2000. p. 137 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  129. ^ M-O-M DEIS Rail Alternaives and Candidate Stations (PDF) (Map). NJTranist. 2005. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  130. ^ New Jersey State Rail Plan (PDF). NJT. April 2015. p. 5-15. Retrieved September 20, 2017.
  131. ^ "Rail Right-of-Way Inventory and Assessment". North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority. October 2013. Retrieved September 23, 2017. In 1996, routes in the Monmouth, Ocean, and Middlesex (MOM) corridor were evaluated for potential feasibility for passenger service. The feasibility study considered eleven possible future alternatives. Nine of the alternatives were build alternatives for commuter rail service to New York Pennsylvania Station, on three different alignments utilizing either the North Jersey Coast Line (NJCL) or Northeast Corridor (NEC), and routing to New York Pennsylvania Station26.In 2001, NJ TRANSIT initiated a DEIS for the development of a rail option using State and Federal funds. The DEIS is examining three alignments: Lakehurst to Monmouth Junction, Lakehurst to Red Bank and Lakehurst to Matawan. In 2006, the alternatives were refined to incorporate direct, one-seat ride, service to New York Penn Station. Ridership, cost and environmental work were adjusted accordingly. Updating demographics and ridership analyses continued during calendar 2009. Lower-cost versions of the three main build alternatives were analyzed and a draft alternatives analysis report was completed in 2010.
  132. ^ "Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Monmouth-Ocean-Middlesex Rail; Monmouth, Ocean, and Middlesex Counties, NJ". Federal Register. October 16, 2002.
  133. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 8, 2012.
  134. ^ Staff. "Virginia's Robby Andrews, a Manalapan native, is leaving school", The Star-Ledger, March 1, 2012. Accessed July 8, 2012. "Manalapan native Robby Andrews, a two-time NCAA 800-meter champion, is leaving the University of Virginia, the school announced today."
  135. ^ Cahillane, Kevin. "Not Fade Away: The Smithereens' Monument to Persistence", The New York Times, October 10, 2004. Accessed November 15, 2008. "'We have the same mentality as the old blues singers,' said the lead guitarist, Jim Babjak, who lives in Manalapan with his wife and three sons."
  136. ^ McGrath, Charles. "The Happy Hustler", The New York Times, October 6, 2007. Accessed June 12, 2008. "Mr. Basavich grew up, one of two children, in Manalapan, N.J."
  137. ^ Heyman, Brian. "Agonizin' loss for Amazin's", Asbury Park Press, September 26, 2007. "Reyes got one back by rocketing Manalapan native Jason Bergmann's third pitch over the fence in right-center to open the bottom half."
  138. ^ Rachel Breton, Sky Blue FC. Accessed July 5, 2018. "Hometown: Manalapan, New Jersey"
  139. ^ Roques, Alice. "Interview: Lou Brutus", RockRevolt magazine. Accessed October 19, 2014. "I grew up in Manalapan Township in Englishtown, New Jersey."
  140. ^ Garcia, Oskar via Associated Press. "Former Manalapan resident Alyssa Campanella takes Miss USA crown", Asbury Park Press, June 20, 2011. Accessed June 20, 2011. "Originally from Manalapan, N.J., Alyssa Campanella began modeling at age 16, graduated from high school a year early and received a scholarship to the New York Conservatory for Dramatic Arts, according to her personal website."
  141. ^ Frank Conover profile, National Football League. Accessed July 23, 2008.
  142. ^ Exclusion List: Frank Coppa Sr. Archived September 20, 2006, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Attorney General. Accessed April 3, 2008.
  143. ^ DeJesus: Baseball beginnings Archived March 4, 2008, at the Wayback Machine, Major League Baseball, October 28, 2003. Accessed February 20, 2008. "My name is David DeJesus. I was born in Brooklyn, New York and raised in Manalapan, New Jersey."
  144. ^ Cronick, Scott. "'America's DJ' Spins His Way Into Taj's Casbah Club", The Press of Atlantic City, December 28, 2001. Accessed June 20, 2011. "'Dance music is growing not as quick as I would like but it's growing' says DeVito a Manalapan resident."
  145. ^ Strunsky, Steve. "Hot Diggity! Dog Diggity! -- Fame; Eating His Way to the Top", The New York Times, May 24, 1998. Accessed August 6, 2012. "Michael DeVito, 36, of Manalapan, won five straight state championships, from 1992 to 1996, in competitions sponsored by that hallowed wiener institution, Nathan's. He is also a three-time world champion -- 1990, 1993 and 1994 -- in the contest held every Fourth of July at the Nathan's on Surf Avenue in Coney Island."
  146. ^ Grossman, Jeremy. "Local comedian Vic DiBitetto prepares for breakout year " Archived December 14, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, News Transcript, November 27, 2014. Accessed December 14, 2014. "In show business, it's not 'who you know,' but 'who knows you.' At least, that seems to be the case for Manalapan resident Vic DiBitetto, who, after 30 years of fighting in the trenches of stand-up comedy, has finally made it big."
  147. ^ "Dylan Dreyer, weather anchor for Today's weekend editions", Today, June 4, 2013. Accessed October 19, 2014. "Dreyer is a native of Manalapan, New Jersey and currently lives in the New York area."
  148. ^ La Gorce, Tammy. "A Rocker Who Rocks to His Own Beat (and CD)", The New York Times, December 2, 2007. Accessed June 8, 2008. "'So I just went,' said Mr. Emmich, who grew up in Manalapan and graduated from Manalapan High School."
  149. ^ Anthony Firkser, Tennessee Titans. Accessed September 28, 2019. "The Manalapan, N.J., native was originally signed by the New York Jets as an undrafted free agent on May 5, 2017."
  150. ^ Best, Neil. "Glazer's been crafty as Fox to become the top insider", Newsday, October 4, 2008. Accessed July 5, 2018. "Glazer grew up in Manalapan, N.J., and attended Pace University while working as a stand-up comic and bartender."
  151. ^ Witkowski, Wayne. "SJV grad Hyman prepares for college football career at Kansas", Greater Media, July 25, 2013. Accessed December 16, 2019. "Just at the time he would have headed to the NJSIAA Meet of Champions (MOC) to compete in the 100- and 200-meter dashes on behalf of St. John Vianney High School (SJV), Ishmael Hyman of Manalapan had to take a different route."
  152. ^ Answering Your Questions!, archived from the original on December 11, 2021, retrieved August 7, 2019
  153. ^ Bassin, Steve. "Manalapan mourns passing of Navy SEAL trainee", News Transcript, February 7, 2022. Accessed February 9, 2022. "Residents in Manalapan are mourning the passing of former Manalapan High School football player Kyle Mullen, 24, of Manalapan, who died on Feb. 4 while training to become a U.S. Navy SEAL."
  154. ^ "Jack Perri Selected as Head Men’s Basketball Coach", Southern New Hampshire University, June 5, 2018. Accessed July 5, 2018. "A native of Manalapan, N.J., Perri and his wife, Julie, are the proud parents of three children, Sean Patrick, Jackson Richard and Charlotte Taylor."
  155. ^ Staff. "Petraglia top-seeded for match play", Associated Press Archive, August 26, 1998. Accessed June 20, 2011. "Petraglia, of Manalapan, N.J., began to pull away from the pack after rolling a 300, as well as two high games of 268."
  156. ^ Orr, Conor. "PBA legend Johnny Petraglia never forgets his roots as a soldier", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, February 24, 2012. Accessed July 5, 2018. "A Manalapan Township resident for the past 32 years, he was molded by his experiences as a soldier and when he came back from Vietnam, he went on a tear that placed him among the top tier of bowlers of all time."
  157. ^ Kadinsky, Sergey. "Assemblyman Dan Rosenthal Sworn In At Pomonok Ceremony" Archived January 27, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, Queens Jewish Link, January 17, 2018. Accessed January 26, 2018. "The youngest member of the State Assembly took his oath of office before a packed auditorium at P.S. 201 in Pomonok, sharing the stage with his family, fiancée, and local political leaders.... Raised in Manalapan, New Jersey, he settled in Queens to study at Touro College’s Lander College for Men."
  158. ^ Fast, Erik. "Long Live King Dan; Dan Smith Strings Together Run of Huge Wins in One of Tournament Poker’s Best Years Ever", Card Player, February 1, 2013. Accessed June 27, 2019. "Since he was a child in Manalapan, New Jersey, Smith has had an affinity for games, but in 2012 he has transformed from being a well-respected poker professional to one of the monsters of the poker world."
  159. ^ Staff. "'Jersey Shore's' Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Opens Up About His Relationship With Family", New York Post, October 4, 2010. Accessed June 20, 2011. "'The Situation' is moving fast -- but keeping it real. He's gone from Manalapan, NJ, to Hollywood in less than a year -- but MTV's Jersey Shore star, born Mike Sorrentino, is coming into his own on Dancing With the Stars."
  160. ^ Herron, Elizabeth; and Warnock-Weiner, Nancy. "Inventory to the Records of the Rutgers University Office of the Secretary (Carl Raymond Woodward), 1928-1943", Rutgers University, May 2002. Accessed February 2, 2022. "Dr. Carl Raymond Woodward was born July 20, 1890, in Tennent, New Jersey. He attended Freehold High School in New Jersey, graduating in 1906."

External links[edit]