Manganese(II) sulfide

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Manganese(II) sulfide
Manganese(II) sulfide
Names
IUPAC name
Manganese(II) sulfide
Other names
Manganese sulfide
Manganese monosulfide
Alabandite
Identifiers
18820-29-6 YesY
PubChem 87809
Properties
MnS
Molar mass 87.003 g/mol
Appearance Red, green or brown powder[1]
Density 3.99 g/cm3[2]
Melting point 1610 ˚C[3]
0.0047 g/100 mL (18 °C)[2]
Structure
Halite (cubic), cF8
Fm3m, No. 225
Octahedral (Mn2+); octahedral (S2−)
Hazards
Main hazards Irritant
Related compounds
Other anions
Manganese(II) oxide
Manganese disulfide
Related compounds
Chromium(II) sulfide
Iron(II) sulfide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
YesY verify (what is YesYN ?)
Infobox references

Manganese(II) sulfide is a chemical compound of manganese and sulfur. It occurs in nature as the mineral alabandite (isometric), rambergite (hexagonal), and recently found browneite (isometric, with sphalerite-type structure, extremely rare, known only from a meteorite).[4]

Synthesis[edit]

Manganese(II) sulfide can be prepared by reacting a manganese(II) salt (such as manganese(II) chloride) with ammonium sulfide:

(NH
4
)
2
S
+ MnCl
2
→ 2 NH
4
Cl
+ MnS

Properties[edit]

The crystal structure of manganese(II) sulfide is similar to that of sodium chloride.

The pink color of MnS likely results from poor coupling between the lowest energy unoccupied Mn orbitals, resulting in discrete states rather than a delocalized band. Thus the lowest energy band-to-band electronic transition requires very high energy (ultraviolet) photons.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.espimetals.com/msds's/manganesesulfide.pdf
  2. ^ a b Sicherheitsdatenblatt Alfa-Aesar
  3. ^ WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements
  4. ^ Mindat, http://www.mindat.org/min-42751.html