Mangere Bridge, New Zealand

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Mangere Bridge
Western part of the suburb seen from Mangere Domain.
Western part of the suburb seen from Mangere Domain.
Mangere Bridge is located in New Zealand
Mangere Bridge
Mangere Bridge
Coordinates: 36°56′36″S 174°47′5″E / 36.94333°S 174.78472°E / -36.94333; 174.78472Coordinates: 36°56′36″S 174°47′5″E / 36.94333°S 174.78472°E / -36.94333; 174.78472
CountryNew Zealand
Local authorityAuckland Council
Population
 (2013)[1]
 • Total5,952
(Manukau Harbour) (Manukau Harbour) (Mangere Inlet)
(Manukau Harbour)
Mangere Bridge
Favona
(Manukau Harbour) Mangere Favona
The Mangere Bridge suburb to the lower left, as well as the Mangere Bridge(s) in the background.

Mangere Bridge (officially Māngere Bridge) is an Auckland suburb under the local governance of the Auckland Council, at the south end of Mangere's bridge over the Manukau Harbour.

It includes Mangere Mountain and is close to the Ambury Farm Park run by the Auckland Council.[2]

It is a multicultural area, often with large families, with the suburb dominated by brick-and-tile homes built in the 1960s-1970s.[2]

In 2019, the name of the suburb was officially gazetted as Māngere Bridge.[3]

Marae[edit]

Te Puea Marae, the local marae, is a tribal meeting ground for the Waikato Tainui hapū of Ngāti Kuiaarangi, Ngāti Mahuta, Ngāti Tai and Ngāti Whāwhākia. It includes a meeting house, also called Te Puea.[4][5] The marae has helped hundreds of homeless people find housing, through a philosophy of manaakitanga.[6]

Association football[edit]

Mangere Bridge is home to Onehunga-Mangere United football club.

Notable residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2013 Census QuickStats about a place : Mangere Bridge
  2. ^ a b "Mangere - Property". The New Zealand Herald. 7 May 2005. Retrieved 7 February 2011.
  3. ^ "Place name detail: Māngere Bridge". New Zealand Gazetteer. Land Information New Zealand. Retrieved 2 August 2019.
  4. ^ "Te Kāhui Māngai directory". tkm.govt.nz. Te Puni Kōkiri.
  5. ^ "Māori Maps". maorimaps.com. Te Potiki National Trust.
  6. ^ Nielson, Michael (19 September 2018). "Te Puea Marae model of manaakitanga 'key' to tackling homelessness crisis". New Zealand Media and Entertainment. New Zealand Herald.

External links[edit]