Manhattan Athletic Club

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Manhattan Athletic Club
Manhattan Athletic Club.jpg
Manhattan Athletic Club, 1889
Formation November 7, 1877; 139 years ago (1877-11-07)
Type Athletic club
Key people
Lon Myers, member and world-record-holding runner

The Manhattan Athletic Club was an athletic club in Manhattan, New York.[1][2]

The Manhattan Athletic Club was organized on November 7, 1877, and legally incorporated on April 1, 1878.[1][2][3] Its emblem was a "cherry diamond".[4]

It established an athletic cinder ash track at Eighth Avenue, between West 56th and West 57th Streets, in Manhattan, which opened in 1878.[1][3] In 1883, it secured grounds at the block between Eighth Avenue and Ninth Avenue, between West 86th Street and West 87th Street.[5] In November 1886, it secured a clubhouse at 594 Fifth Avenue.[6] The club established a new clubhouse at the southeast corner of Madison Avenue and East 45th Street in 1890, with one of the largest gymnasiums in the world, at 100 feet by 110 feet.[6][7] Through 1917, boxing matches were hosted at the club.[8][9][10]

American runner and world record holder Lon Myers was a notable member of the club.[1] Other notable members included speed skater Joe Donoghue, runner Thomas Conneff,[11][12] and Elliott Fitch Shepard.[13]

In 1893, with significant debts, its directors decided to dissolve the club.[14] Andrew Freedman became receiver of the Manhattan Athletic Club when it fell into receivership.[15][16] A new Manhattan Athletic Club was opened the following year.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d The Illustrated American. 1891. Retrieved October 26, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b A history of American amateur athletics and aquatics: with the records. 1888. Retrieved October 26, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b The Sun's guide to New York: Replies to questions asked every day by the guests and citizens of the American metropolis. 1892. Retrieved October 26, 2011. 
  4. ^ "INSIGNIA OF THE CLUBS; EMBLEMS THAT ATHLETES HAVE BEEN PROUD TO WEAR. THE VARIOUS DEVICES WERE MOSTLY CHOSEN TO REPRESENT STRENGTH, ENDURANCE, OR FLEETNESS, BUT A FEW BECAUSE OF NEAT EFFECT -- SOME UNIQUE DESIGNS.". The New York Times. February 26, 1893. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  5. ^ ".". Daily True American. May 9, 1889. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b [1]
  7. ^ "MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB.". The New York Times. November 29, 1890. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  8. ^ ".". The Day. January 9, 1889. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  9. ^ ".". The Day. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  10. ^ "DILLON OUTPOINTS FLYNN. - Has Better of Hotly Contested Bout at Manhattan A.C.". Select.nytimes.com. March 11, 1916. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  11. ^ ".". Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  12. ^ ".". December 8, 1891. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  13. ^ Homans, James E., ed. (1918). The Cyclopedia of American Biography. The Press Association Compilers. pp. 299–300. 
  14. ^ [ Displaying Abstract ] (January 29, 1893). "DEBTS TOO BIG TO CARRY – MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB GETS A RECEIVER. ANDREW FREEDMAN APPOINTED BY JUDGE PATTERSON ON PETITION OF THE DIRECTORS – ASSETS $1,440,834 AND LIABILITIES $1,096,107.97 – JAMES M. VARNUM, REFEREE.". The New York Times. Retrieved October 26, 2011. 
  15. ^ "MR. FREEDMAN A MAGNATE; Will Probably Own the New-York Baseball Club. NEGOTIATIONS NOW IN PROGRESS To Control the Majority of Stock and Personally Supervise the Management of the Club's Affairs". The New York Times. January 17, 1895. 
  16. ^ "Will Not Close Its Doors.; Manhattan Athletic Club To Continue Under A Receiver". The New York Times. February 8, 1893. 
  17. ^ "A WELL APPOINTED CLUB – Promising Outlook of the New Manhattan Athletic Club. OPENING CEREMONIES TO-MORROW Handsome Decorations for the Event – Chauncey M. Depew to Speak – Amusement Features of the New Organization.". The New York Times. December 14, 1894. Retrieved October 26, 2011. 

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