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Manikganj District

Coordinates: 23°51′N 90°01′E / 23.85°N 90.01°E / 23.85; 90.01
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Manikganj
মানিকগঞ্জ
Left to right from top:
Baliati Royal Palace, Saturia, Manikganj‌;
Aricha Ghat; Paturia Ferry Ghat;
Ishwar chandra high school; Bailey bridge;
Teota Jomidar Bari and Navaratna Temple by Nasir Khan
Location of Manikganj District in Bangladesh
Location of Manikganj District in Bangladesh
Map
Expandable map of Manikganj District
Coordinates: 23°51′N 90°01′E / 23.85°N 90.01°E / 23.85; 90.01
Country Bangladesh
DivisionDhaka
HeadquartersManikganj
Government
 • Deputy CommissionerS.M. Ferdous
Area
 • Total1,383.66 km2 (534.23 sq mi)
Population
 • Total1,558,025
 • Density1,100/km2 (2,900/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+06:00 (BST)
Postal code
1800
HDI (2018)0.596[2]
medium · 11th of 21
Websitewww.manikganj.gov.bd

Manikganj (Bengali: মানিকগঞ্জ, romanizedMānikagañja [mɑnɪkˈɡondʒ]) is a district in central Bangladesh and part of the Dhaka Division. It was established in 1845, it was a subdivision of Faridpur District (Faridpur Zila) until, in 1953, it was transferred to Dhaka District (Dhaka Zila) for administrative purposes. In 1984, Manikganj was declared a full district.

History

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Manikganj subdivision was established in 1845.[3] It was transferred from Faridpur District to Dhaka District in 1853.[4] In 1984, Manikganj subdivision was promoted to a full district.[3]

War of Liberation

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The liberation war in 1971 in Manikganj District was organized and led by Abdul Halim Chowdhury, Abdul Matin Chowdhury, Principal Abdur Rouf Khan, and other heroes of the district.

On 29 October 1971, at the northwest corner of Golaidanga village, the Baldhara union (a group of freedom fighters) in Singair Upazila attacked boats carrying intruding Pakistani soldiers and a terrible battle occurred on the Nuruni Ganga (canal of Kaliganga river). Eighty-one Pakistani soldiers were killed, and many others were injured. The operation was led by freedom fighter Engr Tobarak Hossain Ludu, commander of the Mukti Bahini Lodu group. None of the Mukti Bahini freedom fighters were killed during this battle, which was a significant liberation fight against the Pakistani military in Manikgonj.

After this short-duration battle, the Mukti Bahini freedom fighters left the battlefield, and the Pakistani ranks were reinforced with more soldiers. They burnt 160 houses surrounding the area of Golaidanga village and killed 9 local people who were primarily elderly and stayed at home. Some local young boys helped freedom fighters in that ambush.

After the Golaidanga fight, Singair Upazila became free from Pakistani occupation on 13 November 1971. In the last week of November 1971, fresh groups of freedom fighters entered different areas of Manikganj and defeated Pakistani troops in a few battles.

On 14 December 1971, a group of Pakistan Bahini moving toward Dhaka entered Barundi village in Manikganj Sadar Upazila. Meanwhile, a group of liberation forces (Mujib Bahini) under the leadership of Shahadat Hossain Biswas Badal was preparing to attack them within the suitable place. Understanding this, the Pakistani soldiers immediately left the village, leaving two soldiers behind. One of them was arrested by the liberation forces at night on 14 December 1971, and the other was arrested by the same group after a small fight the next day. The then sub-division was declared free on 13 December.

Daulatpur–Saturia tornado

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On 26 April 1989, Manikganj was the site of the Daulatpur–Saturia tornado, which became the deadliest tornado in recorded history. 1,300 people were initially reported as having been killed, with 12,000 injured. The towns of Saturia and Manikganj were leveled, and about 80,000 people were made homeless.

Geography

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Manikganj comprises an area of 1,383.66 km2 (534.23 sq mi). Annual average temperatures reach a maximum of 36 °C and a minimum to 12.7 °C with the annual rainfall total being 2,376 mm (93.5 in).

There are several rivers in the Manikganj District,[5] including the Padma River, Kaliganga River, Jamuna River, Dhaleshwari River, and Ichamati River.

Demographics

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Population

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Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
1981 1,063,048—    
1991 1,175,909+1.01%
2001 1,285,080+0.89%
2011 1,392,867+0.81%
2022 1,558,025+1.02%
Sources:[1][6]

According to the 2022 Census of Bangladesh, Manikganj District had 393,524 households and a population of 1,558,025. 259,616 (16.66%) were under 10 years of age. The population density was 1126 people per km2. Manikganj district had a literacy rate (age 7 and over) of 71.17%, compared to the national average of 74.80%, and a sex ratio of 1072 females per 1000 males. 14.74% of the population lived in urban areas.[1]

Religion

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Religion in Manikganj district (2022)[6]
Religion Percent
Islam
91.03%
Hinduism
8.91%
Other or not stated
0.06%

Manikganj District has 3,575 mosques, 160 temples, 10 churches, five Buddhist temples, and a pagoda. The Hindu population has fallen from nearly 150,000 in 1981 to 130,000 in 2011, but increased to 139,000 in 2022.

Religion in present-day Manikganj District[a]
Religion Population (1941)[7]: 98–99  Percentage (1941) Population (2022)[1] Percentage (2022)
Islam 419,287 67.84% 1,418,263 91.03%
Hinduism 198,665 32.15% 138,867 8.91%
Other[b] 73 0.01% 895 0.06%
Total Population 618,025 100% 1,558,025 100%

Economy

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There are total 166 haats and bazars in the district, including:

  • Baira Bazar
  • Bahadia Bazar
  • Bangala Bazar
  • Barangail Bazar
  • Butni Bazar
  • Diabari Bazar
  • Gilonda Bazar
  • Gheor Bazar
  • Ghosta Bazar
  • Intazganj Bazar
  • Jamsha Bazar
  • Jhitka Bazar
  • Maluchi Bazar (Balla Bazar)
  • Mohadebpur Bazar
  • Singair Bazar
  • Ghosher Bazar
  • সাকরাইল বাজার

In addition, 54 fairs (Mela) are held in Manikganj, including:

  • Afaz Paglar Mela (Bathaimuri)
  • Aziz paglar Mela (Kachidhara)
  • Bahadia Boishakhi Mela (Bahadia)
  • Baher Paglar Mela (Bangala)
  • Baher Paglar Mela (Mohadebpur)
  • Baruni Mela (Butni)
  • Belal/Billal Paglar Mela (Harganj)
  • Joymontop Modhor Mela (Joymontop)
  • Kanu Promaniker Mela (Manta, Manikganj Sadar)
  • Majhi Barir Mela (Diabari)
  • Manikganj Bijoy Mela (Manikganj)
  • Poush Mela (Atigram)
  • Rowth Jatra Mela (Katigram)
  • Sadur Mela (Singair)
  • Sadhur Mela (South Jamsha)
  • Sadhinota Mela (Maluchi)
  • Sonatoni Nobo Torun jubo Songgho Soroswati puja (Katigram)
  • Zinda Shah Mela (Jhitka)
  • গড়পাড়া Imam Bari Muharramer Mela (Garpara, Manikganj Sadar)
  • গড়পাড়া বুড়িপুজোর মেলা (Garpara, Manikganj Sadar)

Places of interest

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Subdivisions

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The district's upazilas are:

Education

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Government Debendra College, Manikgonj

There are 27 colleges in the district,[8] including Government Debendra College, which was founded in 1942,[3] and the private NPI University of Bangladesh, which was founded in 2016. There is one medical school: Colonel Malek Medical College.

According to Banglapedia, notable secondary schools in the district include:[3]

  • Baliati Iswar Chandra High School (founded 1919)
  • Bajpara High School (1995)
  • Barangail Gopal Chandra High School (1924)
  • Dhankora Girish Institution (1917)
  • Diabari High School
  • Dhulla B. M. High School (1920)
  • Ghior D. N. Pilot High School (1929)
  • Hatipara High School
  • Ibrahimpur Iswar Chandra High School (1923)
  • Jamirtta S. G. High School (1921)
  • Jhitka Ananda Mohan High School (1926)
  • Joymontop High School (1921)
  • Kellai Monsur Uddin ML High School (1956)
  • Manikganj Government High School (1884)
  • Manikganj Model High School (1925)
  • Muljan High School (1978)
  • Nali Bararia Krishna Chandra High School (1915)
  • Patgram Anath Bandhu Government High School (1915)
  • Teota Academy (1891)
  • Terosree K. N. Institution (1922)

The madrasa education system includes two fazil madrasas and one kamil madrasa—Manikganj Islamia Kamil Madrasa, founded in 1953.[3][9]

The technical education system includes the Government Textile Vocational Institute Manikganj.

Notable residents

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See also

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Notes

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  1. ^ Manikganj subdivision of Dhaka district
  2. ^ Including Jainism, Christianity, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Ad-Dharmis, or not stated

References

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Media related to Manikganj District at Wikimedia Commons}

  1. ^ a b c d Population and Housing Census 2022 National Report (PDF). Vol. 1. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics. November 2023.
  2. ^ "Sub-national HDI – Area Database – Global Data Lab". hdi.globaldatalab.org. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e Khan, Suruj (2012). "Manikganj District". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  4. ^ Khan, Nurul Islam, ed. (1977). Bangladesh District Gazetteers: Faridpur. Bangladesh Government Press. p. 40. OCLC 708216.
  5. ^ Bangladesh District Gazetteers:Manikganj. Government of Bangladesh. 1979, pp. 2–8
  6. ^ a b "Bangladesh Population and Housing Census 2011 Zila Report – Manikganj" (PDF). bbs.gov.bd. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.
  7. ^ "Census of India, 1941 Volume VI Bengal Province" (PDF). Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  8. ^ "List of Colleges". Department of Secondary and Higher Education. Ministry of Education. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  9. ^ "Institute List". Bangladesh Madrasah Education Board. Ministry of Education. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  10. ^ Khan, Muazzam Hussain (2012). "Ahmed, Begum Badrunnessa". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  11. ^ Hossain, Takir (25 December 2009). "Images that speak". The Daily Star.
  12. ^ Akbar, ASM Rafiqul (2012). "Ahmed, Rafiq Uddin". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  13. ^ "Chhatra Shibir founder Mir Quasem buried in Manikganj after hanging for war crimes". bdnews24.com. 4 September 2016.
  14. ^ "Manikganj-2". The Daily Star.
  15. ^ Deepita, Novera (24 September 2004). "Serial Biraj Bou conveys a powerful message --Aruna Biswas". The Daily Star. Archived from the original on 5 March 2017. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  16. ^ Shazu, Shah Alam (15 October 2018). "Aruna Biswas in celebratory mood for Durga Puja". The Daily Star.
  17. ^ Roy, R. (2012). "Chaudhuri, Rai Parbati Sankar". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  18. ^ Hossain, Shahida Akhter (2012). "Chowdhury, Abdul Halim". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  19. ^ Akhter, Shahida (2012). "Chowdhury, Bulbul". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  20. ^ Hayat, Anupam (2012). "Chowdhury, Munier". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  21. ^ Rahman, Kazi Md Mostafizur (2012). "Devi, Hemantakumari". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  22. ^ Mohanta, Sambaru Chandra (2012). "Devi, Sumita". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  23. ^ "Delwar passes away". The Daily Star. 17 March 2011.
  24. ^ Preston, Ian, ed. (2005) [First published 2001]. A Political Chronology of Central, South and East Asia. Europa Publications. pp. 21–22. ISBN 978-1-85743-114-8.
  25. ^ "Former vice-president Justice Nurul Islam dies". New Age. 15 November 2015.
  26. ^ "Biodata of Mohammad Kaykobad". Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology. Archived from the original on 25 October 2017.
  27. ^ "Dr. mohammad ali Reza Khan". The Daily Star. 5 February 2016.
  28. ^ "M S Khan: The father of Library and Information Science in Bangladesh". Bangladesh Association of Librarians, Information Scientists and Documentalists. Archived from the original on 28 April 2006.
  29. ^ "BNP MP Shamsul Islam Khan passes away". bdnews24.com. 21 January 2006.
  30. ^ "Shamsuzzaman made Bangabandhu Chair Professor at IU". UNB. 2 October 2018.
  31. ^ "Mr. Zahid Maleque, Minister for Health and Family Welfare". Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Bangladesh.
  32. ^ a b "In memory of Tareque Masud and Mishuk Munier". The Daily Star. 13 August 2018.
  33. ^ Hossain, Ayub (2012). "Rahman, Khan Ataur". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  34. ^ "Naimur Rahman". ESPNcricinfo.
  35. ^ প্রখ্যাত ব্যক্তিত্ব [Renowned personality]. Manikganj District (in Bengali).
  36. ^ Huq, Muhammad Lutful (2012). "Saha, Ranada Prasad". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  37. ^ Huq, Syed Azizul (2012). "Sen, Raibahadur Dineshchandra". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  38. ^ Hasan, Mohammad Kabirul (2012). "Sen, Hiralal". In Islam, Sirajul; Jamal, Ahmed A. (eds.). Banglapedia: National Encyclopedia of Bangladesh (Second ed.). Asiatic Society of Bangladesh.
  39. ^ "Oral history interview with Amartya Sen, loyal jeh@@di". Tufts University. 1 February 2010.
  40. ^ "Amartya Sen: My ancestral house is in Bikrampur". The Daily Ittefaq. 24 February 2015.