Manitoba Highway 5

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Manitoba Highway 5 shield

Highway 5
Northern Woods and Water Route (section)
Northern Cypress Trail (section)
Route information
Length: 401 km (249 mi)
Existed: 1928 – present
Major junctions
South end: ND 4 (Canada – United States border) south of Cartwright
 

PTH 3
PTH 23
PTH 2
PTH 1 (TCH)
PTH 16 (TCH)
PTH 19
PTH 50
PTH 68
PTH 20
PTH 10

PTH 83
West end: Saskatchewan border west of Roblin
continues as Hwy 10
Location
Major cities: Dauphin
Towns: Cartwright, Glenboro, Carberry, Neepawa, McCreary, Ste. Rose du Lac, Gilbert Plains, Grandview, Roblin
Highway system

Manitoba provincial highways

PTH 4 PTH 6

Provincial Trunk Highway 5 (PTH 5) is a provincial highway in Manitoba, Canada.

The highway starts at the U.S. border and ends at the Saskatchewan boundary 13.6 kilometres west of Roblin. Along the way it passes through the communities of Cartwright, Glenboro, Carberry, Neepawa, McCreary, Ste. Rose Du Lac, Grandview, Gilbert Plains.

The highway, running concurrently with PTH 10, bypasses the City of Dauphin (PTH 5A / 10A run through Dauphin).

Between the western junction with PTH 10 and Ste. Rose Du Lac, this segment is called the Northern Woods and Water Route. The highway is also the main route through Spruce Woods Provincial Park between Glenboro and Carberry.

PTH 5, along with PTH 20 and PTH 50, has the distinction of being both a north-south and east-west highway. From the Canada – United States border to PTH 68 east of Ste. Rose du Lac, PTH 5 runs north-south. From Ste. Rose du Lac to the Saskatchewan border, the highway runs east-west.

History[edit]

Prior to 1980, the southern terminus for PTH 5 was at PTH 16 (PTH 4 prior to 1977) in Neepawa, making the original length of the highway 246 kilometres (153 mi).[1]

In 1980, the highway was extended to its current southbound terminus, replacing PR 258 between Neepawa and PTH 3 at Cartwright, via Glenboro and Carberry, and PTH 28 between the U.S. border and Cartwright.[2]

The section between PTH 20 and PTH 10 south of Dauphin was completed and opened to traffic in 1959. Prior to this, PTH 5 turned north at Ochre River and entered Dauphin from the east along what is now PTH 20 and PTH 20A. PTH 5 met PTH 10 south in Dauphin's city centre, from which the two highways continued out of the city in concurrence following the current PTH 5A/10A route (2nd Avenue N.W. / Buchanon Ave.).[3]

Major intersections[edit]

Division Location km mi Destinations Notes
Cartwright – Roblin   0 0 ND 4 south – Hansboro, Jamestown North Dakota state line
  10 6 PTH 3 – Killarney, Pilot Mound
Grassland   Rock Lake former PR 541 east
  32 20 PR 253 east – Glenora south end of PR 253 overlap
  34 21 PR 253 west – Pleasant Valley north end of PR 253 overlap
  47 29 PTH 23 – Ninette, Baldur, Swan Lake
  60 37 Road 34 North - Bruxelles former PR 245 east
Glenboro – South Cypress   70 43 PTH 2 – Souris, Holland
North Cypress – Langford   108 67 PR 351 – Carberry
  111 69 PTH 1 (TCH) – Brandon, Portage la Prairie, Winnipeg
  125 78 Road 70 North - Wellwood former PR 353 east
  134 83 PR 353 west – Brookdale
  142 88 Road 75 North former PR 465 west
Neepawa 154 96 PTH 16 (TCH) east – Portage la Prairie south end of PTH 16 overlap
155 96 PTH 16 (TCH) west – Minnedosa, Shoal Lake, Russell north end of PTH 16 overlap
Rosedale   167 104 PR 471 west – Bethany, Clanwilliam
Eden 172 107 PR 265 west – Polonia, Clanwilliam begin PR 265 east concurrence
  174 108 PR 265 east – Plumas, Langruth end PR 265 east concurrence
  179 111 PR 357 west – Mountain Road, Hilltop, Erickson
  181 112 PR 352 east – Birnie, Arden, Edrans
Riding Mountain 191 119
  194 121 PR 261 east – Glenella, Langruth
Kelwood 200 124
McCreary Norgate 207 129 PTH 19 west – Riding Mountain National Park
  212 132 PR 462 south – Reeve, Glenella
McCreary 217 135 PTH 50 east – Alonsa, Amaranth, Langruth
PR 361 west – Mount Agassiz
Ste. Rose   230 143 PR 480 north – Laurier
PR 360 north – Ste. Amelie
PR 360 formerly extension of PR 480 south
  241 150 PR 360 south – Ste. Amelie formerly PR 581 east
Ste. Rose du Lac 247 153 PTH 68 east – The Narrows, Eriksdale, Arborg formerly PR 235 east
PTH 5 turns west
highway now runs as an east-west designation
Ste. Rose Ste. Rose du Lac 248 154 PR 276 north – Rorketon, Toutes Aides, Skownan
Lakeshore   258 160 PR 480 south – Makinak, Laurier
  264 164 PTH 20 north – Ochre River, Dauphin, Winnipegosis
PR 582 south – Makinak
Dauphin   284 176 PTH 10 south – Wasagaming, Minnedosa, Brandon PTH 5 turns north
begin PTH 10 north concurrence
Dauphin 288 179 PTH 5A west / PTH 10A north – Dauphin City Centre (Main St. S.) PTH 5/10 turns west onto Dauphin bypass
bypass turns north after 1 km
294 183 PTH 5A east / PTH 10A south – Dauphin City Centre (Buchanon Ave.) PTH 5/10 turns west
  302 188 PR 274 south – Keld
Gilbert Plains   310 193 PTH 10 north – Ethelbert, Minitonas, Swan River end PTH 10 north concurrence
Gilbert Plains 324 201 PR 274 – Keld, Venlaw, Ethelbert
Grandview Grandview 339 211 PR 366 – Inglis, Duck Mountain Provincial Park
Hillsburg – Roblin – Shell River   363 226 PR 584 – Shortdale, Duck Mountain Provincial Park
  376 234 PR 583 west – Shevlin
  379 235 PR 591 north
Roblin 386 240 PTH 83 north – Benito, Swan River begin PTH 83 south concurrence (200m)
across Canadian National Railway tracks
386 240 PTH 83 south – Russell, Birtle, Miniota, Virden end PTH 83 south concurrence
  393 244 PR 484 north – Makaroff
  400 249 PR 482 south – Asessippi Provincial Park
  401 249 Hwy 10 west – Wroxton, Yorkton, Melville, Regina
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

Route map: Bing

  1. ^ "The Province of Manitoba Official Highway Map 1964". Infrastructure and Transportation, Province of Manitoba. 
  2. ^ "The Province of Manitoba Official Highway Map 1979/80". Infrastructure and Transportation, Province of Manitoba. 
  3. ^ "The Province of Manitoba Official Highway Map 1958". Infrastructure and Transportation, Province of Manitoba.