Manitoba Highway 9

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Highway 9 shield

Highway 9
Route information
Length: 85 km (53 mi)
Major junctions
South end: PTH 101 / Route 52 in Winnipeg
  PTH 27
PTH 44
PTH 67
PTH 9A
PTH 4
North end: PR 222 / PR 231 at Gimli
Location
Towns: Lockport, Lower Fort Garry, Selkirk, Winnipeg Beach
Highway system

Manitoba provincial highways

PTH 8 PTH 9A

Provincial Trunk Highway 9 (PTH 9) is a provincial highway in the Canadian province of Manitoba. It runs from Winnipeg (where it meets with Route 52) north to Gimli.

The highway is known as Main Street between Winnipeg and Selkirk, as this is the name of the road within both of those cities, and has a suburban character as a 4-lane, mostly undivided highway with numerous residences and businesses. At Selkirk, the highway turns off to bypass the city and becomes more of a rural highway. The bypass around Selkirk is known as the "Selkirk By-Pass". The road that runs through Selkirk is known as PTH 9A (Main Street also continues as PTH 9A, and then as PR 320 until PTH 4, where it becomes Breezy Point Road).

History[edit]

Originally, Highway 9 followed what is now Routes 42 (then known as Route 40) and 57 through Winnipeg. Outside the Perimeter, the route followed Provincial Road 204 to Lockport, where it would join its present alignment.[1]

Today's PTH 9 between Winnipeg and Lockport was previously Highway 1 prior to 1958,[2] and Highway 4 between 1958 and 1968. The Selkirk By-Pass between PR 230 and PTH 9A was not signed. In 1968, PTH 9 was moved to its present alignment.[3]

At Gimli, the roadway continues northerly as Provincial Road 222.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Province of Manitoba Official Highway Map; 1960". Infrastructure and Transportation, Province of Manitoba. 
  2. ^ "The Province of Manitoba Official Highway Map; 1955". Infrastructure and Transportation, Province of Manitoba. 
  3. ^ "The Province of Manitoba Official Highway Map; 1968". Infrastructure and Transportation, Province of Manitoba. 

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata