Manitowoc County, Wisconsin

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Manitowoc County, Wisconsin
County
Official seal of Manitowoc County, Wisconsin
Seal
Map of Wisconsin showing Manitowoc County
Map of Wisconsin showing Manitowoc County
Wisconsin's location in the United States
Wisconsin's location in the United States
Country United States United States
State Wisconsin Wisconsin
Incorporated 1848
County seat City of Manitowoc
Incorporated Municipalities
Government
 • Type County
 • Body Board of Supervisors
 • Board President Jim Brey
 • County Board 25 commissioners
Area
 • Total 1,494 sq mi (3,870 km2)
 • Land 589 sq mi (1,530 km2)
 • Water 905 sq mi (2,340 km2)
Area rank 6th largest county in Wisconsin
Population (2010)
 • Total 81,442
 • Rank 21st largest county in Wisconsin
 • Density 138/sq mi (53/km2)
Time zone Central (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) Central (UTC-5)
Area codes 920
Congressional districts 6th
Interstates

I-43.svg


U.S. Routes

US 10.svg US 151.svg


State Routes

WIS 32.svg WIS 42.svg WIS 57.svg WIS 67.svg WIS 147.svg WIS 310.svg


Airports

Manitowoc County Airport


Waterways

Lake MichiganManitowoc River


Public transit Maritime Metro Transit
Website co.manitowoc.wi.us

Manitowoc County /ˈmæntəwɔːk/ is a county in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 81,442.[1] Its county seat is Manitowoc.[2] The county was created in 1836 prior to Wisconsin's statehood and organized in 1848.[3]

Manitowoc County comprises the Manitowoc, WI Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,494 square miles (3,870 km2), of which 589 square miles (1,530 km2) is land and 905 square miles (2,340 km2) (61%) is water.[4]

Major highways[edit]

Airport[edit]

Manitowoc County Airport (KMTW) serves the county and surrounding communities.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

2000 Census Age Pyramid for Manitowoc County.
Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 235
1850 3,702 1,475.3%
1860 22,416 505.5%
1870 33,364 48.8%
1880 37,505 12.4%
1890 37,831 0.9%
1900 42,261 11.7%
1910 44,978 6.4%
1920 51,644 14.8%
1930 58,674 13.6%
1940 61,617 5.0%
1950 67,159 9.0%
1960 75,215 12.0%
1970 82,294 9.4%
1980 82,918 0.8%
1990 80,421 −3.0%
2000 82,887 3.1%
2010 81,442 −1.7%
Est. 2016 79,536 [5] −2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2014[1]

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 82,887 people, 32,721 households, and 22,348 families residing in the county. The population density was 140 people per square mile (54/km²). There were 34,651 housing units at an average density of 59 per square mile (23/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.90% White, 0.30% Black or African American, 0.43% Native American, 1.98% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.60% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. 1.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 53.7% were of German, 7.3% Polish, 5.3% Czech and 5.0% American ancestry according to Census 2000. 95.2% spoke English, 1.8% Spanish, 1.3% Hmong and 1.1% German as their first language.

There were 32,721 households out of which 31.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.10% were married couples living together, 7.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.70% were non-families. 26.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.50% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 28.20% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 15.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.10 males.

Government[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 57.0% 23,244 35.6% 14,538 7.4% 3,004
2012 50.7% 21,604 47.9% 20,403 1.4% 610
2008 45.4% 19,234 52.9% 22,428 1.8% 752
2004 52.1% 23,027 46.8% 20,652 1.1% 481
2000 49.9% 19,358 45.5% 17,667 4.6% 1,799
1996 38.4% 13,239 48.6% 16,750 12.9% 4,455
1992 33.9% 14,008 38.5% 15,903 27.5% 11,357
1988 44.5% 16,020 54.7% 19,680 0.8% 287
1984 52.5% 19,639 46.2% 17,250 1.3% 487
1980 48.0% 18,591 44.7% 17,330 7.3% 2,811
1976 43.6% 16,039 53.9% 19,819 2.5% 913
1972 48.5% 16,599 48.2% 16,489 3.3% 1,132
1968 44.2% 13,562 49.9% 15,298 5.9% 1,801
1964 31.0% 9,849 68.9% 21,927 0.1% 39
1960 45.6% 14,622 54.3% 17,423 0.1% 35
1956 61.9% 18,078 37.0% 10,800 1.1% 321
1952 61.3% 18,950 38.4% 11,879 0.2% 72
1948 44.0% 10,947 53.9% 13,401 2.1% 515
1944 53.5% 14,047 45.5% 11,949 1.0% 251
1940 48.3% 12,616 50.3% 13,142 1.4% 368
1936 21.2% 5,094 64.7% 15,539 14.1% 3,393
1932 22.0% 4,573 75.4% 15,696 2.6% 536
1928 41.7% 7,519 57.1% 10,292 1.2% 221
1924 29.5% 4,828 9.8% 1,599 60.7% 9,918
1920 61.7% 8,378 14.9% 2,018 23.4% 3,183
1916 46.5% 4,224 47.7% 4,338 5.8% 529
1912 31.1% 2,389 44.7% 3,436 24.2% 1,855
1908 45.4% 4,126 43.5% 3,952 11.1% 1,013
1904 53.3% 4,626 37.7% 3,274 9.0% 783
1900 49.5% 4,317 47.8% 4,167 2.7% 238
1896 51.6% 4,430 45.6% 3,919 2.8% 242
1892 33.6% 2,249 65.1% 4,349 1.3% 87

The county executive is Bob Ziegelbauer. He is serving his second term in that position after being elected in April 2006 and reelected in April 2010.[needs update] The county is served by a 25 member county board.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

In the media[edit]

The Netflix documentary series Making a Murderer (2015) explores the arrests and trials in 2007 of Manitowoc County residents Steven Avery and his nephew Brendan Dassey for the murder of Teresa Halbach, who disappeared in October 2005. The series describes an earlier wrongful conviction of Avery, for which he served 18 years, and his subsequent lawsuit against Manitowoc County. It then focuses on the procedures of the Calumet County Sheriff's Office and the Manitowoc County Sheriff's Department, which investigated the later Halbach case.[12][13]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Wisconsin: Individual County Chronologies". Wisconsin Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Retrieved August 15, 2015. 
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 6, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 6, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 6, 2015. 
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 6, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 6, 2015. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  11. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  12. ^ MONICA DAVEY, "Questioning the Evidence in the ‘Making a Murderer’ Case", New York Times, 29 January 2016; accessed 14 January 2016
  13. ^ Hale, Mike (December 16, 2015). "Review: ‘Making a Murderer,’ True Crime on Netflix". The New York Times. Retrieved December 20, 2015. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Falge, Louis (ed.). History of Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. Chicago: Goodspeed Historical Association, 1912. Vol. 1, Vol. 2
  • Langill, Ellen, Robin E. Butler, Rachel Young, and MaryBeth Matzek. Manitowoc County: A Beacon on the Lakeshore. Milwaukee, Wis.: Milwaukee Pub. Group, 1999.
  • Plumb, Ralph Gordon. A History of Manitowoc County. Manitowoc, Wis.: Brant Print & Binding Co., 1904.
  • Rapper, Joseph J. Story of a Century, 1848-1948: Manitowoc County During Wisconsin's First Hundred Years. Manitowoc, Wis.: Manitowoc County Centennial Committee, 1948.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°09′N 87°33′W / 44.15°N 87.55°W / 44.15; -87.55