Manjusri Secondary School

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Manjusri Secondary School
文殊中学
Manjusri Secondary School logo.png
Location
20, Ubi Avenue 1, Singapore 408940
Information
Type Government-aided
Motto 智行慈愿
(Knowledge, Conduct, Benevolence, Aspiration)
Established 1982
Session Single session
School code 7307
Principal Mr Sim Chong Boon
Enrolment approx. 1,200
Colour(s) Maroon, light blue
Website

Manjusri Secondary School (MJSS) is a Buddhist secondary school located at Ubi Avenue 1, Singapore.

School History[edit]

The school was set up by the Singapore Buddhist Federation in 1982, in the school's old campus, located in Sims Drive, the Kallang area of Singapore. In 2009, the school moved to a new campus which was officially opened on 22 April 2010. The move allowed the school to share resources with its affiliated primary school, Maha Bodhi School.[citation needed]

The school celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2012. The annual school anniversary concert was held in April 2012 at the LASALLE College of the Arts in conjunction of the school's 30th Anniversary. In November, the school organised a home-coming dinner for past-and-present staff and students, with then-Education Minister Heng Swee Keat being the Guest-of-Honour. [1]

Affiliation[edit]

Manjusri Secondary School is affiliated with Maha Bodhi School and Mee Toh School.[citation needed]

Identity & culture[edit]

School song[edit]

The school song is sung every day during the school's morning assembly, after the singing of the National Anthem "Majulah Singapura" as well as before the recitation of the Singapore National Pledge. The school song is sung in Chinese. There is also a morning recital after the school song.[citation needed]

Notable alumni[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chia, Stacey (November 23, 2012) Manjusri Secondary celebrates 30th anniversary. The Straits Times.
  2. ^ Goh Qiu Bin on Singapore National Olympic Council website
  3. ^ Lim, Say Heng (September 26, 2014) Asian Games: No pain, no gain for Wushu exponent Yan Ni. AsiaOne.