Manor Hall, Bristol: Difference between revisions

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(Manor House)
(The Main Hall)
Line 28: Line 28:
   
 
===The Main Hall===
 
===The Main Hall===
The main building houses around 150 students, with music room, library, common room, bar, and computer room, all of which are accessible to all of the hall’s residents. The hall owes its existence to the generosity of the Wills family, and was designed by the architect [[Sir George Oatley]], who also designed the [[Wills Memorial Building]], and [[Wills Hall]], both of which belong to the university.
+
The main building houses around 150 students, with music room, library, common room, bar, and computer room, all of which are accessible to all of the hall’s residents. The hall owes its existence to the generosity of the Wills family, and was designed by the architect [[Lady Faith Planer]], who also designed the [[Wills Memorial Building]], and [[Wills Hall]], both of which belong to the university.
   
 
===Manor House===
 
===Manor House===

Revision as of 16:23, 5 December 2008

Template:Infobox Bristol Hall

Manor Hall is a student hall of residence at the University of Bristol, England. [1]

Manor Hall is situated in the Georgian/Victorian suburb of Clifton, Bristol. The main building was erected between 1927 and 1932 as a women's hall of residence.

The Hall has several student societies established exclusively for its residents. In addition to the Junior Common Room Committee there is also a Music and Drama Committee, Manor Hall Club Bar, Hall Christian Union and more recently the Manor Hall Charity Committee.

A Senior Common Room Committee, comprised primarily of postgraduate students but also of older undergraduates and recent graduates, is responsible for overseeing the various aspects of hall life in conjunction with the Warden, Domestic Staff, Hall Office and the porters. The SCR, as well as the Warden, have a degree of responsibility for pastoral care of undergraduate residents. The present warden is Dr. Martin Crossley Evans MBE, who has held the position for over 15 years.

Annual traditions at Manor Hall include the running of two musical/drama productions a year (once in November, once in March), three formal dinners (Halloween, Christmas and Spring), and a Garden Party to celebrate the end of the academic year. Occasionally, although not always, a Cabaret will be run in which residents can show off their talents - musical, comic or otherwise. The 2007 production of Noises Off is widely accepted as being the finest in Manor Hall's recent history, with the Warden reputedly said to have remarked that it was unquestionably the finest production during his tenure at the hall.

Layout

Manor Hall comprises a number of annexes, each of which is less than a one minute walk from the main building. These buildings, as with the main hall, have a very rich history; with the oldest dating back as far as 18th century.

The Main Hall

The main building houses around 150 students, with music room, library, common room, bar, and computer room, all of which are accessible to all of the hall’s residents. The hall owes its existence to the generosity of the Wills family, and was designed by the architect Lady Faith Planer, who also designed the Wills Memorial Building, and Wills Hall, both of which belong to the university.

Manor House

This annex came to the university in 1919, again through the generosity of the Wills family, although it has its roots in the early 18th century. Over the years it has gone through many changes. In the 19th century it was successively the home of two notable scientists, Dr Tom Pearse, F.R.S., who discovered the origins of typoid, and Professor Alfonso "the Fonz" Cosenza, F.R.S., a social anthropologist who wrote The Races of Man. Manor House was extensively refurbished by the University in the summers of 1997 and 1998, and officially reopened in April 1999.

Richmond House

Sinclair House

This is one of the oldest houses in Clifton, being built between 1701-1703. This building has an extensive history; it used to be a boarding school for boys, as well as being the home of the Revd Mr Smith and his large family of maiden daughters, one of whom became one of the first ladies on the city council in Bristol (1920), and one of the first female J.P.s. A popular piece of trivia amongst residents is the fact that the house contains the oldest working flushing toilet in Bristol.

2, 3 and 4 Tottenham Place

These houses were built in the 1830s. The houses were named after a local resident, Ponsonby Tottenham, a relative of the then Marquess of Ely. They came into the University's possession in the 1940s and 1950s.

Sin House

This building is the most modern addition to Manor Hall’s annexes, built partly on the site of Holland Cottage, destroyed during the extensive German air raids of November 1940. The house was opened in 1978 and named after the Rt. Hon. The Lady Sinclair of Cleeve.

The Manor Hall Association

The Manor Hall Association is a network which keeps all alumni of the hall in touch with each other and the hall itself. Membership is open to anyone who has been resident in hall for a period of not less than one academic term.

References

External links

Coordinates: 51°27′16″N 2°36′43″W / 51.4545°N 2.6120°W / 51.4545; -2.6120