Mansfield, New York

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Mansfield, New York
Town
Mansfield is located in New York
Mansfield
Mansfield
Location within the state of New York
Coordinates: 42°18′36″N 78°45′24″W / 42.31000°N 78.75667°W / 42.31000; -78.75667Coordinates: 42°18′36″N 78°45′24″W / 42.31000°N 78.75667°W / 42.31000; -78.75667
Country United States
State New York
County Cattaraugus
Government
 • Type Town Council
 • Town Supervisor Robert C. Keis, Sr. (R)
 • Town Council
Area
 • Total 40.2 sq mi (104.0 km2)
 • Land 40.1 sq mi (103.9 km2)
 • Water 0.04 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Elevation 1,873 ft (571 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 808
 • Density 20/sq mi (7.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
FIPS code 36-45161
GNIS feature ID 0979193
Website mansfieldny.org

Mansfield is a town in Cattaraugus County, New York, United States. The population was 808 at the 2010 census.[1] The name was thought to be that of a noble family in England.[citation needed]

The town is centrally located in Cattaraugus County, north of Little Valley.

History[edit]

The area was first settled around 1817. The town of Mansfield was formed in 1830 from part of the town of Town of Little Valley. The town was first called "Cecilius". The name "Mansfield" was adopted in 1831.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 40.2 square miles (104.0 km2), of which 40.1 square miles (103.9 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 0.08%, is water.[1]

The town is primarily served by county roads. Cattaraugus County Route 14 (Toad Hollow Road) runs from south to north through the town, while Cattaraugus County Route 13 (Maples Road) runs west to east in the northern part of the town, and County Route 15 (Dublin Road) runs along the southern part of the town. New York State Route 242 passes across the southeast corner of the town and New York State Route 353 through a small portion of the southwest corner.

Mansfield Creek flows across the north part of the town, and Little Valley Creek crosses the southwest corner. The two creeks follow a similar path in opposite directions, separated by the Saint Lawrence River Divide.

Adjacent towns and areas[edit]

(Clockwise)

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 378
1840 942 149.2%
1850 1,057 12.2%
1860 1,265 19.7%
1870 1,135 −10.3%
1880 1,106 −2.6%
1890 1,022 −7.6%
1900 968 −5.3%
1910 912 −5.8%
1920 717 −21.4%
1930 661 −7.8%
1940 620 −6.2%
1950 672 8.4%
1960 632 −6.0%
1970 605 −4.3%
1980 784 29.6%
1990 724 −7.7%
2000 800 10.5%
2010 808 1.0%
Est. 2014 818 [2] 1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[3]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 800 people, 305 households, and 234 families residing in the town. The population density was 20.2 people per square mile (7.8/km²). There were 540 housing units at an average density of 13.6 per square mile (5.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.88% White, 0.12% (one person) African American, 0.75% (six people) Native American, 0.12% (one person) Asian, and 0.12% (one person) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.25% of the population.

There were 305 households out of which 33.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.3% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.0% were non-families. 19.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the town the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 108.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $36,420, and the median income for a family was $37,500. Males had a median income of $27,614 versus $24,750 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,700. About 6.3% of families and 8.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

Communities and locations in Mansfield[edit]

  • Dobbins Memorial State Forest – a state forest in the southern part of the town.
  • Eddyville – a hamlet in the north part of the town on County Road 14. The Mansfield town hall is in Eddyville, as is the town's only currently operating church, the nondenominational Solomon's Porch Ministries.
  • Eddyville Corners – The spot where County Roads 13 and 14 converge, north of Eddyville and west of Maples. A now-abandoned Baptist church (whose congregation has since relocated to Little Valley) is at this spot, as is a state-operated fish stocking outlet on Mansfield Creek.
  • Five Points – A location southwest of Eddyville near the town center on County Road 14. Five Points is the location of a county-operated landfill.
  • Maples – A hamlet east of Eddyville on County Road 13. The Mansfield fire department and highway barns are in Maples.
  • Orlando – A mostly unpopulated hamlet near the east town line on County Road 13.

References[edit]

External links[edit]