Mantle and pavilion (heraldry)

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Heraldic mantle
Mantle with a pavilion on top

In heraldry, a mantle is a symbol of sovereign power and is generally reserved for royalty. In some cases, its use has also been granted to other nobles, in recognition of particular merits. In ordinary rendering, the mantle is usually crimson and lined with ermine.

Certain coats of arms may also display a pavilion surmounting the mantle. The pavilion is said to be the invention of the Frenchman Philip Moreau.[1]

While common in continental European heraldry, the mantle and pavilion is absent in English heraldry.[2]

Gallery[edit]

Royal mantles[edit]

Non-royal mantles[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox-Davies, Arthur Charles (1909). A Complete Guide to Heraldry. London & Edinburgh: T.C. & E.C. Jack. p. 401.
  2. ^ Fox-Davies, Arthur Charles (1909). A Complete Guide to Heraldry. London & Edinburgh: T.C. & E.C. Jack. p. 400.