Manuel Amador Guerrero

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Manuel Amador
Portrait of Manuel Amador Guerrero.jpg
1st President of Panama
In office
20 February 1904 – 1 October 1908
Preceded by Position Established
Succeeded by José Domingo de Obaldía
Personal details
Born Manuel Amador Guerrero
(1833-06-30)30 June 1833
Turbaco, Colombia
Died 2 May 1909(1909-05-02) (aged 75)
Panama City, Panama
Nationality Panamanian
Political party Conservative Party
Spouse(s) Maria Ossa Escobar

Manuel Amador Guerrero (30 June 1833 – 2 May 1909), was the first president of Panama from 20 February 1904 to 1 October 1908. He was a member of the Conservative Party.

Very little is known about his childhood and teenage years. He was born in Turbaco, Colombia, when Panama was part of that country. He came to Panama in 1855 and started working on the Panama Railroad as a doctor. He worked also more than twenty years at the Santo Tomás Hospital. His most important work was as chief doctor of the Panama Railroad. This job was crucial in the role he played in gaining Panamanian independence from Colombia. He was an important player in the independence movement of 1903.

After his presidency[edit]

Amador retired from public life and died soon after in his house on San Felipe. His last coherent words were to express his wish that the National Anthem was played as his body was lowered to his gravesite, a wish that was realized.

Trivia[edit]

References[edit]

  • "55 mandatarios", an album of the Panamanian newspaper La Prensa containing the life of all the Presidents of Panama.
  • Mellander, Gustavo A.(1971) The United States in Panamanian Politics: The Intriguing Formative Years. Daville,Ill.:Interstate Publishers. OCLC 138568.
  • Mellander, Gustavo A.; Nelly Maldonado Mellander (1999). Charles Edward Magoon: The Panama Years. Río Piedras, Puerto Rico: Editorial Plaza Mayor. ISBN 1-56328-155-4. OCLC 42970390.
Political offices
Preceded by
Position created
President of Panama
1904–1908
Succeeded by
José Domingo de Obaldía