Marc-Etienne Janety

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Marc-Etienne Janety (1739-1820) was the Royal Goldsmith to King Louis XVI[1] until 1792, when the King was dethroned. A few of Janety's pieces worked in platinum (a novel metal in the late 1700s[2]) survive. One is a platinum and glass sugar bowl (1786) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.[3] The others are four kilograms Janety made in 1796-1799. One of them was declared the Kilogramme des Archives (Kilogram of the French Archives) and became the legal kilogram standard for France in 1799,[4] until superseded in 1889 by a platinum-iridium kilogram made by the Johnson-Matthey company.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McDonald, Donald; B. Hunt, Leslie (1982). A History of Platinum and its Allied Metals. Johnson Matthey. p. 78. ISBN 0905118839.
  2. ^ Le Corbeiller, Clare (1975). Platinum Metals Review. 19 (4): 154–155. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ "Sugar bowl". The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved 2016-08-16.
  4. ^ McDonald, Donald; B. Hunt, Leslie (1982). A History of Platinum and its Allied Metals. Johnson Matthey. p. 187. ISBN 0905118839.
  5. ^ Quinn, Terry (2011). From Artefacts to Atoms. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195307863.