Marc Guéhi

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Marc Guéhi
Marc Guehi December 2018.jpg
Guéhi playing for Chelsea in 2018
Personal information
Full name Addji Keaninkin Marc-Israel Guéhi[1]
Date of birth (2000-07-13) 13 July 2000 (age 22)[2]
Place of birth Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.82 m)[2]
Position(s) Centre-back[3]
Club information
Current team
Crystal Palace
Number 6
Youth career
2005–2007 Cray Wanderers
2007–2019 Chelsea
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2019–2021 Chelsea 0 (0)
2020Swansea City (loan) 12 (0)
2020–2021Swansea City (loan) 40 (0)
2021– Crystal Palace 38 (2)
National team
2015–2016 England U16 9 (1)
2016–2017 England U17 21 (1)
2017–2018 England U18 4 (0)
2018–2019 England U19 6 (2)
2019–2020 England U20 3 (0)
2019– England U21 16 (1)
2022– England 3 (0)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals, correct as of 04:18, 16 August 2022 (UTC)
‡ National team caps and goals, correct as of 23:39, 14 June 2022 (UTC)

Addji Keaninkin Marc-Israel Guéhi (/ˈɡi/;[4] born 13 July 2000) is an English professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for Premier League club Crystal Palace and the England national team.

Guéhi came through the youth system at Chelsea before spending two seasons on loan at Swansea City. He joined Crystal Palace in July 2021, becoming the club's third most expensive signing. He has represented England at youth level and was a regular starter in the 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup winning squad.

Early life[edit]

Guéhi was born in Abidjan, Ivory Coast,[5] and moved with his family to London, England, at one year of age.[6] His father was a minister of a local church, meaning his childhood often focused on religion and education over football.[7] He began playing in the Cray Wanderers youth system aged six and was coached by a scout from Premier League club Chelsea.[6] After two years with the non-League club, he signed for Chelsea and progressed through the academy.[7]

Club career[edit]

Chelsea[edit]

Progressing through the youth ranks, Guéhi regularly featured for the under-18s during their treble-winning campaign in 2017.[8][9] In September 2017, he signed his first professional contract, for three years.[9][10] The following season, he helped the under-18s win a quadruple and reach the final of the UEFA Youth League.[9]

On 12 May 2019, Guéhi was named in a Premier League squad for the first time as a substitute in a 0–0 draw away to Leicester City.[11] He featured as an unused substitute a further three times during the 2019–20 season.[12] On 17 September, he was an unused substitute in a 1–0 defeat to Valencia in the UEFA Champions League.[13][14] The following week, he made his professional debut in a 7–1 win against Grimsby Town in the EFL Cup third round.[15] His second and final appearance for the club came in a 2–1 defeat to Manchester United in the Fourth Round on 30 October.[16]

Swansea City[edit]

On 10 January 2020, Guéhi joined Championship club Swansea City on loan for the remainder of the 2019–20 season.[17] The move saw him re-unite with Steve Cooper, who had previously managed him in England's 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup winning squad.[18] After being named as an unused substitute on two occasions, Guéhi made his debut in a 2–0 defeat to Stoke City on 25 January.[19][20][21] He remained in the starting XI for the next four games, but came under criticism after Swansea failed to win any of their last five games. Cooper backed the defender and stated "it's difficult for young players to make an instant impact".[22]

Following a three-month pause due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Guéhi was named on the bench twice before returning as a late substitute in a 1–1 draw against Millwall.[23][24][25][26] On 5 July, he made his first start in five months in a 2–1 win over Sheffield Wednesday.[27] He started in all five of Swansea's remaining league matches and helped guide the team to sixth place and a play-off position.[12] He featured in both legs of the semi-final as Swansea lost 3–2 on aggregate to Brentford.[28][29]

On 26 August 2020, Guéhi returned to Swansea on loan for the 2020–21 season.[30] He became an ever-present figure in defence with only four Swansea players appearing for more minutes throughout the campaign.[31] Guéhi began the season with three consecutive clean sheets against Preston North End, Birmingham City and Wycombe Wanderers, and went on to keep a further 14 in the league as Swansea finished fourth.[32][33][34][12] He played every minute of their play-off campaign, beating Barnsley 2–1 across the semi-finals before a 2–0 final defeat to Brentford.[35][36][37]

Crystal Palace[edit]

On 18 July 2021, Guéhi joined Crystal Palace on a five-year contract for a reported fee of £18 million, making him the club's third-most expensive signing of all-time, behind Christian Benteke and Mamadou Sakho.[38][39][40] It was also reported that Chelsea had included sell-on incentives and the right to match any offers made for Guéhi in future.[41]

International career[edit]

Guéhi captained the England national under-17 team at the UEFA European Under-17 Championship in May 2017. He played in every match at the competition, scoring an own goal in the opening 3–1 win against Norway.[42][43][44][45][46] England went on to lose on penalties to Spain in the final.[47][48] In October 2017, he was included in the squad for the 2017 FIFA U-17 World Cup.[49] On 28 October, he scored the fourth goal in a 5–2 victory against Spain as England were crowned world champions.[50]

In October 2018, Guéhi progressed to the England under-19 team and scored in a friendly against Portugal.[51] He also scored in 2019 Elite Qualifiers against the Czech Republic and Denmark.[52][53]

In August 2019, Guéhi was included in an England under-21 squad for the first time.[54] On 6 September 2021, Lee Carsley confirmed Guéhi as captain of the under-21s.[55]

Guéhi received his first call-up to the England senior team in March 2022 as part of Gareth Southgate's squad for friendly matches against Switzerland and Ivory Coast.[56] He made his senior debut in a 2–1 win over Switzerland at Wembley Stadium on 26 March.[57]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

As of match played 15 August 2022
Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
Club Season League FA Cup EFL Cup Europe Other Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Chelsea U23 2018–19[58] 5[a] 0 5 0
2019–20[59] 2[a] 0 2 0
Total 7 0 7 0
Chelsea 2018–19[58] Premier League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2019–20[59] Premier League 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Total 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Swansea City (loan) 2019–20[59] Championship 12 0 2[b] 0 14 0
2020–21[60] Championship 40 0 2 0 0 0 3[b] 0 45 0
Total 52 0 2 0 0 0 5 0 59 0
Crystal Palace 2021–22[61] Premier League 36 2 5 2 1 0 42 4
2022–23[62] Premier League 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0
Total 38 2 5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 44 4
Career total 90 2 7 2 3 0 0 0 12 0 112 4
  1. ^ a b Appearances in EFL Trophy
  2. ^ a b Appearances in Championship play-offs

International[edit]

As of match played 14 June 2022[61]
Appearances and goals by national team and year
National team Year Apps Goals
England 2022 3 0
Total 3 0

Honours[edit]

England U17

Individual

References[edit]

  1. ^ "M. Guéhi: Summary". Soccerway. Perform Group. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  2. ^ a b "Marc Guéhi: Overview". Premier League. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  3. ^ "Marc Guehi: Profile". worldfootball.net. HEIM:SPIEL. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  4. ^ "First Interview with Marc Guéhi". Crystal Palace F.C. 18 July 2021. Retrieved 23 January 2022 – via YouTube.
  5. ^ "Marc Guehi". 11v11.com. AFS Enterprises. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  6. ^ a b "In the Spotlight: Marc Guehi". Swansea City A.F.C. 11 February 2020. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  7. ^ a b Twomey, Liam; James, Stuart (20 March 2021). "Marc Guehi is serious about playing Premier League football". The Athletic. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  8. ^ "New Academy scholars introduced". Chelsea F.C. 30 June 2016. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  9. ^ a b c "Marc Guehi". Chelsea F.C. Retrieved 16 July 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "Premier League Clubs submit Squad Lists" (PDF). Premier League. 1 September 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  11. ^ Sutcliffe, Steve (12 May 2019). "Leicester City 0–0 Chelsea". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  12. ^ a b c "Marc Guehi's Match History". whoscored.com. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  13. ^ McNulty, Phil (17 September 2019). "Chelsea 0–1 Valencia". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  14. ^ Mose, Dickson (18 September 2019). "Who's Marc Guehi? The Chelsea youngster who was on the bench against Valencia". Futaa. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  15. ^ Sanders, Emma (25 September 2019). "Chelsea 7–1 Grimsby Town". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  16. ^ Begley, Emlyn (30 October 2019). "Chelsea 1–2 Manchester United". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  17. ^ "Swansea City seal loan move for Chelsea defender Marc Guehi". Swansea City A.F.C. 10 January 2020. Retrieved 10 January 2020.
  18. ^ Vincent, Gareth (10 January 2020). "Marc Guehi: Chelsea defender joins Swansea City on loan". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  19. ^ Vincent, Gareth (12 January 2021). "Cardiff City 0–0 Swansea City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  20. ^ Pritchard, Dafydd (18 January 2020). "Swansea City 2–1 Wigan Athletic". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  21. ^ "Stoke City 2–0 Swansea City". BBC Sport. 25 January 2020. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  22. ^ Mitchelmore, Ian (20 February 2020). "Steve Cooper lifts lid on talks with 'annoyed' Bersant Celina as Swansea City boss reveals terms of Marc Guehi's Chelsea loan". WalesOnline. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  23. ^ MacInnes, Paul (28 May 2020). "Premier League plans restart on 17 June with Manchester City v Arsenal". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  24. ^ "Middlesbrough 0–3 Swansea City". BBC Sport. 20 June 2020. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  25. ^ Pritchard, Dafydd (27 June 2020). "Swansea City 0–1 Luton Town". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  26. ^ Pearlman, Michael (30 June 2020). "Millwall 1–1 Swansea City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  27. ^ Pritchard, Dafydd (5 July 2020). "Swansea City 2–1 Sheffield Wednesday". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  28. ^ Vincent, Gareth (26 July 2020). "Swansea City 1–0 Brentford". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  29. ^ Stevens, Rob (29 July 2020). "Brentford 3–1 Swansea City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  30. ^ "Marc Guehi seals Swansea City return". Swansea City A.F.C. 26 August 2020. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  31. ^ "Swansea Squad". whoscored.com. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  32. ^ Pritchard, Dafydd (12 September 2020). "Preston North End 0–1 Swansea City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  33. ^ Pritchard, Dafydd (19 September 2020). "Swansea City 0–0 Birmingham City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  34. ^ Vincent, Gareth (26 September 2020). "Wycombe Wanderers 0–2 Swansea City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  35. ^ Woodcock, Ian (17 May 2021). "Barnsley 0–1 Swansea City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  36. ^ Vincent, Gareth (22 May 2021). "Swansea City 1–1 Barnsley". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  37. ^ Vincent, Gareth (29 May 2021). "Brentford 2–0 Swansea City". BBC Sport. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  38. ^ "Crystal Palace sign Marc Guéhi on five-year deal". Crystal Palace F.C. 18 July 2021. Retrieved 20 July 2021.
  39. ^ "Crystal Palace sign £18m Marc Guéhi from Chelsea on five-year deal". The Guardian. 18 July 2021. Retrieved 20 July 2021.
  40. ^ Aarons, Ed (15 July 2021). "Crystal Palace agree fee for defender Marc Guehi with Chelsea". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 July 2021.
  41. ^ "Crystal Palace transfer news: Marc Guehi joins from Chelsea on five-year deal". SkySports. 18 July 2021. Retrieved 18 July 2021.
  42. ^ "Norway 1–2 England". UEFA. 4 May 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  43. ^ "England 4–0 Ukraine". UEFA. 7 May 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  44. ^ "England 3–0 Netherlands". UEFA. 10 May 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  45. ^ "England 1–0 Republic of Ireland". UEFA. 13 May 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  46. ^ "Turkey 1–2 England". UEFA. 16 May 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  47. ^ "Spain 2–2 England (Spain win on penalties 4–1)". UEFA. 19 May 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  48. ^ a b Walker, Andy (19 May 2017). "Young Lions beaten on penalties in UEFA Euro U17 Championship final". The Football Association. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  49. ^ Stone, Simon (4 October 2017). "England U-17 World Cup squad". BBC Sport. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  50. ^ "England's Marc Guehi says U17 World Cup win is the 'best moment of his life'". The Football Association. 28 October 2017. Retrieved 16 July 2021.
  51. ^ "There was an impressive win for Keith Downing's young Lions in Portugal on Thursday". Football Association. 11 October 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  52. ^ "England U19 4–1 Czech Republic U19". UEFA. 20 March 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  53. ^ "England U19 2–2 Denmark U19". UEFA. 26 March 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  54. ^ "First England Under-21 call-ups for Trevoh Chalobah and Marc Guehi". Chelsea F.C. 30 August 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  55. ^ "Crystal Palace defender Marc Guehi to captain England U21s for Euro 2023 qualifying, Lee Carsley confirms". London Evening Standard. 6 September 2021. Retrieved 7 September 2021.
  56. ^ "Guehi earns first England call-up". BBC Sport. Retrieved 17 March 2022.
  57. ^ McNulty, Phil (26 March 2022). "England 2 Switzerland 1". BBC Sport. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  58. ^ a b "Games played by Marc Guehi in 2018/2019". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  59. ^ a b c "Games played by Marc Guehi in 2019/2020". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  60. ^ "Games played by Marc Guehi in 2020/2021". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  61. ^ a b "Games played by Marc Guehi in 2021/2022". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  62. ^ "Games played by Marc Guehi in 2022/2023". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 5 August 2022.
  63. ^ Rostance, Tom (28 October 2017). "England win U17 World Cup: Young Lions fight back to beat Spain in final". BBC Sport. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  64. ^ "Technical Report – Team of the Tournament". UEFA. 19 May 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2019.

External links[edit]