Marc Yu

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Marc Yu
Born (1999-01-05) January 5, 1999 (age 20)
Monterey Park, California
GenresClassical
Occupation(s)Musician
InstrumentsPiano, cello

Marc Yu (born January 5, 1999) is an American musical child prodigy,[1] playing the piano and the cello.

Biography[edit]

Marc has been playing the piano since the age of two and a half, and the cello since the age of six.[citation needed] Marc Yu exhibits prodigiousness in academic subjects, having advanced to high school-level math by the age of seven.[1] In 2005 he was given a Davidson Fellow scholarship,[2] making him the youngest recipient of the bottom-tier award.[3] He has been featured on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Ellen DeGeneres Show (in which he received an accordion), as well as being the focus of a National Geographic television special titled "My Brilliant Brain[1]" (USA title: "Brain Child").

While at a friend's party, Marc heard the children in attendance singing "Mary Had a Little Lamb[1]", at which point the three-year-old went over to the nearby piano and played the song back.[citation needed] By his mother's persuasions he began undertaking formal lessons later that year. Marc has perfect pitch.[1]

His musical idol is famous Chinese pianist Lang Lang.[1] They have performed publicly together twice to date. Marc made his Proms debut with Lang Lang in London on 31 August 2008. They performed Schubert's Fantasia in F minor for piano duet, D940.[4]

Marc made his Carnegie Hall debut on October 27, 2009, when he again performed the Schubert Fantasia with Lang Lang.

He was homeschooled[1][2] by his mother, who over the years taught him English, Mandarin, and Cantonese Chinese, including Chinese calligraphy[1].

Currently Marc lives in San Francisco with his family and attends The Nueva School.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "My Brilliant Brain". Retrieved 2018-04-28.
  2. ^ a b "Davidson Fellows Scholarship Recipients - 10th Anniversary Success Stories". www.davidsongifted.org. Retrieved 2018-04-29.
  3. ^ 005 Davidson Fellows
  4. ^ BBC Proms coverage of Lang Lang recital

http://articles.latimes.com/2005/jun/22/local/me-prodigy22/2

External links[edit]