Marcelo Trobbiani

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Marcelo Trobbiani
Personal information
Full name Marcelo Antonio Trobbiani Ughetto
Date of birth (1955-02-17) February 17, 1955 (age 59)
Place of birth Casilda, Argentina
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Attacking midfielder
Club information
Current team
Sport Huancayo (manager)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1973–1976 Boca Juniors 107 (26)
1976–1980 Elche 159 (38)
1980 Real Zaragoza 15 (2)
1981–1982 Boca Juniors 28 (3)
1982–1983 Estudiantes ? (?)
1984–1985 Millonarios ? (?)
1985–1987 Elche 8 (2)
1987–1988 Estudiantes ? (?)
1988–1989 Cobreloa 54 (12)
1989–1992 Barcelona SC 29 (4)
1993 Talleres de Córdoba 3 (0)
National team
1974–1986 Argentina 15 (1)
Teams managed
2004 Universitario
2005 Provincial Osorno
2006–2008 Boca Juniors (assistant)
2008–2009 Cobreloa
2009 Cienciano
2011 Cienciano
2012–2013 Argentina U-20
2013– Sport Huancayo
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 21 April 2013.
† Appearances (Goals).
This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Trobbiani and the second or maternal family name is Ughetto.

Marcelo Antonio Trobbiani Ughetto (born February 17, 1955 in Casilda, Santa Fe) is an Argentine football (soccer) coach and a former player, he works as the manager of Sport Huancayo in Peru.

Playing career[edit]

An attacking midfielder, Trobbiani was one of the promising young stars to rise in Boca Juniors during the early 1970s. As a juvenile, he debuted in 1973 with the national team when Omar Sivori drafted him for the "phantom squad" that had to play Bolivia for a ticket to the 1974 World Cup. Following the exit of Reinaldo Merlo, he wore the national colors—before Boca's then coach Rogelio Domínguez was aware of his existence.

In 1975, Trobbiani shared Boca's midfield with Benítez, Suñé and Potente, and was criticized for hogging the ball, to the point that fans called him calesita (merry-go-round). After the 1976 season, Trobbiani was sold to Spain in 1976. Boca used the money to buy many players in the local market, starting a major winning streak with coach Juan Carlos Lorenzo.

Trobbiani played for Spanish sides Elche and Real Zaragoza, and acquired European discipline and tactical depth. When he returned to play for Boca in 1981 alongside Diego Maradona, fans saw a more effective player. The team won the 1981 Metropolitano.

In mid-1982, Trobbiani was transferred to Estudiantes de La Plata. Coach Carlos Bilardo made Trobbiani play as a deep-lying centre-forward linking the strong midfield (Russo, Ponce and Sabella) to strikers Trama and Gottardi. The team won two back-to-back championships.

Before the 1986 World Cup in Mexico, Trobbiani was playing for Elche CF. National coach Bilardo called Trobbiani for the tournament, making it clear that he would mainly be used for tactical practice games. He worked tirelessly during the month-long stay in Mexico, where he was Jorge Valdano's roommate, and was rewarded with exactly two minutes of play—the last two minutes of the final match against Germany. His only touch of the ball was a back-heel pass.

Before retirement, Trobbiani showed his class at Chilean side Cobreloa, Ecuadorian side Barcelona SC (with whom he reached the Copa Libertadores finals in 1990) and back in Argentina with Talleres de Córdoba

Managerial career[edit]

Trobbiani went on to coach several teams in South America, with little success. He was sacked from Universitario de Deportes from Peru at the end of 2004. Between 2006 and 2008, he worked as Russo's assistant coach at Boca Juniors, together with former teammate Gottardi.

Between 2008 and 2009 he returned to Chilean football to work as the manager of Cobreloa, where he played in the late 1980s. In 2009 he was appointed as the manager of Peruvian side Cienciano. On 20 2011 he was involved in a bitter dispute with fellow Argentine manager Guillermo Rivarola of Sporting Cristal after the ex-River player complained to the referee in order to get Trobbiani sent off.[1] In September 18, 2013, as coach of Sport Huancayo, he was accused of racism and discrimination by three Brazilian players, Rafael Da Silva, Andrey Nunes y Kleyr Vieira who play in the team. [2]

Honours[edit]

Country[edit]

Argentina

References[edit]

External links[edit]