March 1929

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The following events occurred in March 1929:

March 1, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

March 2, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

March 3, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

March 4, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

  • The Inauguration of Herbert Hoover as 31st President of the United States took place in Washington, D.C. This was the first presidential inauguration to be recorded by sound newsreels, though the microphone did not project Hoover's voice well.[10][11]

March 5, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

March 6, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

March 7, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

March 8, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

March 9, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

March 10, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The army of General Plutarco Elías Calles retook the strategic rail center of Cañitas as Mexican government forces counterattacked.[18]
  • The Egyptian government granted limited rights of divorce to women.[3]

March 11, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

March 12, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Mexican rebels retreated from Saltillo as President Emilio Portes Gil issued a statement saying the revolution had been defeated.[19]
  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was giving a lecture on the paranormal in Nairobi when he displayed a photograph of a supposed ghost in a haunted house in Nottingham. A well-known Nairobi dentist bolted out of his seat and identified himself as the "ghost", explaining that he had posed for the photo in a white sheet some years ago as a trick after he and other members of a party had investigated the house for two weeks and had failed to find any ghost. Doyle accepted the man's explanation, expressed regret at being hoaxed and said he would not show the photograph again.[20][21][22]
  • The silent comedy film Why Be Good? was released.[23]
  • Died: Asa Griggs Candler, 77, American businessman and politician

March 13, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Leon Trotsky gave his first interview to the foreign press in his apartment in Turkey, saying he was writing a book tracing the history of his opposition to Joseph Stalin and expressing a desire to go to Germany because he preferred the care of German physicians.[24]
  • Born: Peter Breck, actor, in Rochester, New York (d. 2012)
  • Died: Sherry Magee, 44, American baseball player (pneumonia)

March 14, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Elba, Alabama was submerged under 10 feet of flood water when the Pea River overflowed. Alabama Governor Bibb Graves delivered a radio broadcast pleading for urgent relief efforts.[25]
  • The Fox Film Corporation, Pathé News and Paramount News unanimously declared after checking their inauguration film footage that Chief Justice William Howard Taft had misstated the Oath of Office when he called on Herbert Hoover to swear to "preserve, maintain and defend the Constitution of the United States", substituting the word "maintain" for "protect". The flub had been caught by 13-year-old student Helen Terwilliger, who had listened to the live radio broadcast of the inauguration in eighth-grade history class in Walden, New York and politely wrote to Taft about the error. Taft later laughed off his mistake by saying, "I think you'll have to get along with what I've already said. After all, I don't think it's important."[26]

March 15, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

March 16, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

March 17, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

March 18, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

March 19, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

March 20, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

March 21, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

March 22, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

March 23, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

March 24, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

March 25, 1929 (Monday)[edit]

  • Jackie Fields defeated Jack Thompson by 10-round decision in Chicago to claim the vacant world welterweight title.[39] 35 were injured in a riot that broke out in the eighth round after two black spectators took offense to something that a heckler yelled at the African-American boxer Thompson.[40]
  • Born: William R. Richardson, U.S. Army general, in Taichow, Kiangsu, China
  • Died: Jan Kubisz, 81, Polish educator and poet

March 26, 1929 (Tuesday)[edit]

March 27, 1929 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Al Capone appeared before a grand jury in Chicago for the second time in a week. After completing his testimony he was arrested for contempt of court and released after posting $500 bail.[42]
  • Born: Rita Briggs, baseball player, in Ayer, Massachusetts (d. 1994)

March 28, 1929 (Thursday)[edit]

March 29, 1929 (Friday)[edit]

March 30, 1929 (Saturday)[edit]

March 31, 1929 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The second Trans-American Footrace, nicknamed the "Bunion Derby", began in New York City. 77 runners were competing for a total of $60,000 in prize money awarded to first 15 people to reach the finish line in Los Angeles.[47]
  • The airplane Southern Cross and its crew went missing over northwest Australia, on the first leg of an attempt to fly from Sydney to England.[48]
  • Died: Myron T. Herrick, 74, American politician and ambassador to France

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Year End Review – 1929". CanadaGenWeb.org. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  2. ^ Reuters (4 March 1929). "Peking Revolt. Regiment of Troops Mutiny". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 376. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  4. ^ "New Move in Coal Dispute". The Advertiser. Adelaide: 1. January 9, 1930.
  5. ^ "County of San Mateo Werder Pier Restoration Feasibility Study" (PDF). San Mateo County Environmental Services Agency. March 2004. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  6. ^ Root, Waverley (March 4, 1929). "Nobile Blamed by Inquiry for Polar Disaster". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  7. ^ "Paris Deaths Doubled Owing to Cold Wave". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 4, 1929. p. 4.
  8. ^ Gomery, Douglas. "Problems in Film History: How Fox Innovated Sound. Hollywood As Historian: American Film in a Cultural Context. Ed. Peter C. Rollins. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1983. p. 30. ISBN 978-0-8131-4864-9.
  9. ^ Cornyn, John (March 4, 1929). "Mexicans Revolt; Seize Nogales and Vera Cruz". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  10. ^ Hovey, Lonnie J. (2014). Lafayette Square. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. p. 115. ISBN 978-1-4671-2203-0.
  11. ^ Vaughn, Stephen L. (2008). Encyclopedia of American Journalism. Oxon and New York: Routledge. p. 404. ISBN 978-1-135-88020-0.
  12. ^ a b "Chronology 1929". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  13. ^ Kinsley, Philip (March 8, 1929). "Hoover Calls Extra Session for April 15". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  14. ^ "The Broadway Parade". Film Daily. New York: Wid's Films and Film Folk, Inc.: 2 March 18, 1929.
  15. ^ "Lindbergh Flies Over Rebel Zone to Open Air Line". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 9, 1929. p. 1.
  16. ^ "20,000 Texans Welcome Lindbergh as He Ends Hop Over Revolt-Torn Mexico". Brooklyn Daily Eagle: 1. March 10, 1929.
  17. ^ "King of Spain's Niece Weds Polish Nobleman at Madrid". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 10, 1929. p. 2.
  18. ^ Dwyer, Orville (March 11, 1929). "Calles Seizes Rail Center". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  19. ^ Cornyn, John (March 13, 1929). "Revolution Fails, Says Gil". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  20. ^ "Dentist Exposes "Ghost Photo" in Doyle Photo". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 14, 1929. p. 24.
  21. ^ Pugh, Brian W. (2009). A Chronology Of The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle. MX Publishing. ISBN 978-1-78092-198-3.
  22. ^ "Photograph of Ghost". The Mercury. Hobart: 10. August 2, 1929.
  23. ^ "Why Be Good?". Silent Era. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  24. ^ "Russia's Ex-War Lord Will Fight Foes With Pen". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 14, 1929. p. 24.
  25. ^ "4,000 in Alabama Town Periled by Flood". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 15, 1929. p. 1.
  26. ^ Bendat, Jim (2012). Democracy's Big Day: The Inauguration of Our President. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse. pp. 36–38. ISBN 978-1-935278-48-1.
  27. ^ "Flood Terror Sweeps South". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 16, 1929. p. 1.
  28. ^ "Calles' Army Captures Durango, Rebels Flee". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 15, 1929. p. 1.
  29. ^ Bradley, Edwin M. (1996). The First Hollywood Musicals: A Critical Filmography of 171 Features, 1927 Through 1932. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-7864-2029-2.
  30. ^ Bradley, p. 352
  31. ^ Cornyn, John (March 19, 1929). "Mexican Rebels Ask Peace". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  32. ^ "Capone, as U.S. Witness, Shuns His Old Haunts". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 21, 1929. p. 3.
  33. ^ Greenberg, Michael I. (2006). Encyclopedia of Terrorist, Natural, and Man-made Disasters. Sudbury, Massachusetts: Jones and Bartlett Publishers. p. 179. ISBN 978-0-7637-3782-5.
  34. ^ "U.S. Guns Sink a British Ship; Sailor Killed". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 23, 1929. p. 1.
  35. ^ "Report Canada Charges U. S. Broke Treaty". Chicago Daily Tribune: 2. April 6, 1929.
  36. ^ Reid, John Howard (2008). Silent Films & Early Talkies on DVD: A Classic Movie Fan's Guide. Lulu.com. ISBN 978-1-4357-1073-3.
  37. ^ "Italy Rolls Up Huge Vote for Policy of Duce". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 25, 1929. p. 1 and 10.
  38. ^ "100,000 Pass Before Bier of Marshal Foch". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 25, 1929. p. 1.
  39. ^ "Jackie Fields". BoxRec. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  40. ^ "Thirty-Five Hurt in Uproar at Coliseum Fight". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 26, 1929. p. 1 and 18.
  41. ^ Wales, Henry (March 27, 1929). "Paris Like Vast Silent Tomb as Foch is Buried". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  42. ^ Porazzo, Daniel M. "The Al Capone Trial: A Chronology". UMKC School of Law. Archived from the original on October 31, 2014. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  43. ^ Wales, Henry (March 29, 1929). "I.T. & T. Buys a World Wide Radio Chain". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  44. ^ "New $7,000,000 Stadium Opens; Draws 15,000". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 29, 1929. p. 1.
  45. ^ "Tommy Loughran". BoxRec. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  46. ^ Holston, Kim R. (2013). Movie Roadshows: A History and Filmography of Reserved-Seat Limited Showings, 1911–1973. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-7864-6062-5.
  47. ^ Kastner, Charles B. (2014). The 1929 Bunion Derby: Johnny Salo and the Great Footrace Across America. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press. p. xv. ISBN 978-0-8156-1036-6.
  48. ^ Myers, Jack (April 12, 1929). "Southern Cross Found; Report Crew Safe, Well". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.