March 1931

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The following events occurred in March 1931:

March 1, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

March 2, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

March 3, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

March 4, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

March 5, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

March 6, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

March 7, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

March 8, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The Balkans were hit again with a 6.9 magnitude earthquake.[11] 35 were killed in Yugoslavia alone and thousands were left homeless.[12][13]
  • Born: Neil Postman, author, media theorist and cultural critic, in New York City (d. 2003)

March 9, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

March 10, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

March 11, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

March 12, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

March 13, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

  • The German People's Party announced its withdrawal from the coalition government of Thuringia, saying they could no longer work with the Nazi Party as coalition partners due to constant attacks from them.[20][21]
  • The French village of Le Châtelard was saved when the landslide split into three great rivers of earth that bypassed it. The Interior Ministry sent an emergency fund to assist villagers left homeless by the landslide.[19]

March 14, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

  • The Prince of Wales opened a British trade exposition in Buenos Aires. He addressed the crowd of 2,000 in Spanish and then pressed a gold button opening the exhibition's gates.[22]
  • A riot broke out at Joliet Prison. One inmate was killed and four others, including a guard, were injured.[23]
  • Ernst Henning, a communist member of the Hamburg city council, was murdered by three Nazis.[24][25]

March 15, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

March 16, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

  • Communists stormed NSDAP headquarters in Altona, Hamburg and killed a Nazi in retaliation for the murder of Ernst Henning. The Nazi leadership officially condemned the Henning murder and called on the three killers to give themselves up to police, which they did.[25]

March 17, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

March 18, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

March 19, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

March 20, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

March 21, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

March 22, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

March 23, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

  • The Indian revolutionaries Bhagat Singh, Shivaram Rajguru and Sukhdev Thapar were hanged in Lahore for assassinating a British police commissioner in 1928 and throwing a bomb into the legislative assembly in 1929.[38]
  • King Alfonso XIII of Spain restored the country's constitutional guarantees ahead of municipal elections scheduled for April 12.[39]

March 24, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

March 25, 1931 (Wednesday)[edit]

March 26, 1931 (Thursday)[edit]

  • An international conference of 48 nations opened in Rome to discuss the problem of low grain prices. Many countries were displeased by the Soviet Union's practise of harvesting vast amounts of grain and then dumping the surplus on the world market.[35][43][44]
  • Swissair was founded.
  • Born: Leonard Nimoy, actor and director, in Boston, Massachusetts (d. 2015)

March 27, 1931 (Friday)[edit]

  • A Soviet delegate at the international wheat conference said that Russia would continue exporting as much surplus grain as it pleased and would listen to the proposals of other nations, but would make no commitment to accept them.[44]
  • Born: David Janssen, actor, in Naponee, Nebraska (d. 1980)
  • Died:

March 28, 1931 (Saturday)[edit]

March 29, 1931 (Sunday)[edit]

March 30, 1931 (Monday)[edit]

  • Alfred Hugenberg bitterly attacked Hindenburg's emergency decree, saying it was enforced only to prevent the Stahlhelm from winning a referendum demanding the dissolution of the Prussian Landtag. The cabinet of Heinrich Brüning countered with a statement accusing the Nationalists of "seeking to undermine the public's confidence in President von Hindenburg", adding, "To demand a repeal of the decree is a personal attack on the president."[48]
  • At the Rome wheat conference, Austrian Agriculture Minister Engelbert Dollfuss blamed Prohibition in the United States for the world's agricultural problems, saying, "If the United States would drop Prohibition so that the American farmers could raise hops to make beer, then the strain of wheat crops would be relieved and the United States would drop out of the wheat exporting category to the relief of the entire world."[49]

March 31, 1931 (Tuesday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Russia Starts Trial of 14 for Counter Revolt". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 2, 1931. p. 3.
  2. ^ "L'Allemagne en 1931". Krononations. Archived from the original on May 22, 2015. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  3. ^ "Tageseinträge für 2. März 1931". chroniknet. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  4. ^ ""The Star-Spangled Banner" becomes official". History. A+E Networks. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  5. ^ Marton, Janos (March 3, 2015). "Today in NYC History". Untapped Cities. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  6. ^ "India Rejoices; Peace Pact with Britain is Signed". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 5, 1931. p. 3.
  7. ^ "Tageseinträge für 5. März 1931". chroniknet. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  8. ^ "6 March 1931: Ruth Rowland Nichols". Women in Aerospace History. March 6, 2015. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  9. ^ a b "Quake, Storms, and Flood Play Havoc in Europe". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 8, 1931. p. 3.
  10. ^ "Danube Collision". The Straits Times. Singapore: 11. March 9, 1931.
  11. ^ "Significant Earthquake". National Geophysical Data Center. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  12. ^ "150 Killed, 800 Hurt in Quakes; Kings to Rescue". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 9, 1931. p. 2.
  13. ^ Swenson, Egbert (March 12, 1931). "Jugo-Slavs Dig Out of Ruins as Quakes Keep Up". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3.
  14. ^ "14 Russians Get 5 to 10 Year Jail Terms for Plot". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 10, 1931. p. 6.
  15. ^ "Tageseinträge für 9. März 1931". chroniknet. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  16. ^ Zimmer, Ben (April 23, 2012). "Tracking Down the Roots of a "Super" Word". Visual Thesaurus. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  17. ^ "300 lives lost in burning ship" The Times (London). Friday, 13 March 1931. (45770), col C, p. 14.
  18. ^ "Flee Falling Mountain; Two Towns Buried". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 13, 1931. p. 1.
  19. ^ a b Taylor, Edmond (March 14, 1931). "Huge Landslide Splits; May Save Villages in Path". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3.
  20. ^ "Tageseinträge für 13. März 1931". chroniknet. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  21. ^ "German Party Bolts; Seeks Aid to Oust Fascists". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 14, 1931. p. 2.
  22. ^ Tatam, Harold (March 15, 1931). "Wales Presses Gold Button to Open British Trade Fair". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16.
  23. ^ "Rage in Cells After Riot". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 15, 1931. p. 1.
  24. ^ a b Röhl, Bernhard (March 14, 2006). "Drei Schüsse im März". Die Tageszeitung. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  25. ^ a b Schultz, Sigrid (March 17, 1931). "German Reds Cry "Revenge"; Raid Fascists, Slay 1". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 18.
  26. ^ Steele, John (March 16, 1931). "Irish President Talks to U. S. on St. Patrick". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  27. ^ "Early Days". Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  28. ^ "Search Serbia for Bombers in Belgrade Blasts". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 18, 1931. p. 12.
  29. ^ "Jack Pickford, Film Star, is Seriously Hurt in Mishap". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 18, 1931. p. 7.
  30. ^ Alfred, Randy (March 18, 2011). "March 18, 1931: The Schick Hits the Fans". Wired. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  31. ^ "Nevada leagalizes gambling". History. A+E Networks. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  32. ^ "Scores Wounded as German Reds Battle Fascists". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 21, 1931. p. 6.
  33. ^ "29 Rembrandt Paintings in 30 Called Fakes". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 21, 1931. p. 1.
  34. ^ Darrah, David (March 22, 1931). "Catholic Church Forbids Modern Sex Education". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8.
  35. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 401. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  36. ^ Steele, John (March 23, 1931). "Drop German Pact! Britain Warns Austria". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  37. ^ "Famous British Train Wrecked; 6 Die; Many Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 23, 1931. p. 1.
  38. ^ Shirer, William (March 25, 1931). "Guns Rule India as Three Rebels Die on Gallows". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 13.
  39. ^ "Alfonso Restores Guarantees in Spain". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 23, 1931. p. 13.
  40. ^ Griffis, C. N. (March 25, 1931). "Troops Mutiny in Lima; 200 Slain in Battle". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  41. ^ "Bill to Permit Japanese Women to Vote Loses Again". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 25, 1931. p. 13.
  42. ^ Curriden, Mark (March 1, 2013). "March 25, 1931: The saga of the Scottsboro Boys begins". ABA Journal. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  43. ^ Darrah, David (March 26, 1931). "Mussolini, as Farmer, Will Open Conference". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 35.
  44. ^ a b Darrah, David (March 28, 1931). "Russia Refuses to Slow Up its Output of Grain". Chicago Daily Tribune: 11.
  45. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 29, 1931). "Iron Dictator Rule Clamped Upon Germany". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8.
  46. ^ Shirer, William (March 30, 1931). "India Demands Freedom – and 'Nothing Else'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 16.
  47. ^ "Dictator Rule Brings Germany Riotless Sunday". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 30, 1931. p. 5.
  48. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (March 31, 1931). "Germany to Punish Attacks on Hindenburg's 'Iron Rule'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 22.
  49. ^ Darrah, David (March 31, 1931). "World Wheat Crisis Laid to U.S. Prohibition". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  50. ^ "Historic Earthquakes". United States Geological Survey. Retrieved May 22, 2015.
  51. ^ "1931". Music And History. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved May 22, 2015.