Marchenoir

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Marchenoir
Commune
Town hall
Town hall
Coat of arms of Marchenoir
Coat of arms
Marchenoir is located in France
Marchenoir
Marchenoir
Location within Centre-Val de Loire region
Marchenoir is located in Centre-Val de Loire
Marchenoir
Marchenoir
Coordinates: 47°49′27″N 1°23′44″E / 47.8242°N 1.3956°E / 47.8242; 1.3956Coordinates: 47°49′27″N 1°23′44″E / 47.8242°N 1.3956°E / 47.8242; 1.3956
Country France
Region Centre-Val de Loire
Department Loir-et-Cher
Arrondissement Blois
Canton La Beauce
Intercommunality Beauce et Forêt
Government
 • Mayor (2014–2020) Marc Fesneau
Area1 9.42 km2 (3.64 sq mi)
Population (2013)2 652
 • Density 69/km2 (180/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
INSEE/Postal code 41123 /41370
Elevation 124–151 m (407–495 ft)
(avg. 135 m or 443 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Marchenoir is a commune in the Loir-et-Cher department of central France. The nearby forest of Marchenoir was the site of L'Aumône Abbey, a Cistercian daughter house of Cîteaux Abbey. The Earl of Buckingham stayed at the Abbey in 1380 whilst his army was quartered in the Forest.[1]

History[edit]

In 1650 Claude Pajon was appointed to be pastor to the Reformed Church at Marchenoir.[2]

Population[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1793497—    
1806507+2.0%
1821548+8.1%
1831500−8.8%
1841529+5.8%
1851594+12.3%
1861708+19.2%
1872656−7.3%
1881719+9.6%
1891668−7.1%
1901611−8.5%
1911631+3.3%
1921572−9.4%
1931553−3.3%
1946572+3.4%
1954599+4.7%
1962633+5.7%
1968669+5.7%
1975667−0.3%
1982633−5.1%
1990627−0.9%
1999632+0.8%
2008692+9.5%
2013652−5.8%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Froissart, John (1395). Froissart's Chronicles Book II. Manuscript. Retrieved 1 August 2015. 
  2. ^ Gootjes, Albert (2013). Claude Pajon (1626-1685) and the Academy of Saumur: The First Controversy over Grace. Brill.