Marcia Bartusiak

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Marcia Bartusiak
Bartusiak.jpg
NationalityAmerican
OccupationJournalist
Academic
Known forScience writing
AwardsKlumpke-Roberts Award (2010), AIP Science Writing Award (1982, 2001), History of Science Society's Davis Prize (2010), AIP Gemant Award (2006)

Marcia F. Bartusiak is an author, journalist, and Professor of the Practice of the Graduate Program in Science Writing at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She writes about the fields of astronomy and physics.[1] Marcia has been published in National Geographic, Discover, Astronomy, Sky & Telescope, Science, Popular Science, World Book Encyclopedia, Smithsonian, and MIT Technology Review.[2] She is a columnist for Natural History magazine.[3] Bartusiak has twice won the American Institute of Physics Science Writing Award - in 2001 for Einstein's Unfinished Symphony and in 1982 for "The Ultimate Timepiece" in Discover Magazine.

She won the 2006 American Institute of Physics Andrew W. Gemant Award.[4] "The Andrew Gemant Award recognizes the accomplishments of a person who has made significant contributions to the cultural, artistic, or humanistic dimension of physics given annually."[5] Her latest books are Dispatches from Planet 3, a collection of cosmological essays, a revision of Einstein's Unfinished Symphony, on the history of gravitational-wave astronomy, and Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled on by Hawking Became Loved. Bartusiak is also the author of Thursday's Universe, a layman's guide to the frontiers of astrophysics and cosmology, and Through a Universe Darkly, a history of astronomers' centuries-long quest to discover the universe's composition. Both were named notable science books by The New York Times. More recently published are The Day We Found the Universe, a narrative saga of the birth of modern cosmology and the 2010 winner of the History of Science Society's Davis Prize (this prize recognizes books in the history of science directed to a wide public audience),[6] and Archives of the Universe, a history of the major discoveries in astronomy told through 100 of the original scientific publications.

Bibliography[edit]

Year Title Publisher Subject matter
1986 Thursday's Universe Random House Astronomy and Astrophysics
1993 Through a Universe Darkly HarperCollins History of Astronomy
2000 Einstein's Unfinished Symphony: Listening to the Sounds of Space-Time Joseph Henry Press Astronomy
2004 Archives of the Universe: A Treasury of Astronomy's Historic Works of Discovery Pantheon Books History of Astronomy
2009 The Day We Found the Universe Pantheon Books History of Astronomy
2015 Black Hole Yale University Press History of Astronomy
2017 Einstein's Unfinished Symphony: The Story of a Gamble, Two Black Holes,

and a New Age of Astronomy

Yale University Press Astronomy and Astrophysics
2018 Dispatches from Planet 3 Yale University Press Astronomy and Astrophysics

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Faculty and Staff : MIT Grad Program in Science Writing". Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  2. ^ Bartusiak, Marcia. "Marcia Bartusiak". Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  3. ^ "Natural History Magazine". Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  4. ^ "MIT News". Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  5. ^ "Andrew Gemant Award - American Institute of Physics". Retrieved 2014-03-14.
  6. ^ "History of Science Society". Archived from the original on 2007-10-27. Retrieved 2014-03-14.

External links[edit]