Marcia Wilbur

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Marcia Wilbur
Pen name aicra
Occupation Author
Nationality American
Subject Copyright

Marcia Wilbur is an American writer, activist, free software and free speech advocate, poet, linux-elitist [1], author of The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Writers Press, 2000)[2], DMCA, Linux Essentials (2003) [3], and A Decade of the DMCA (2009). [4]

Early life[edit]

Marcia Wilbur was born in Anaheim, California and grew up in a working-class family in Norwich, Connecticut. Her father, Willard L Wilbur Jr. was founder and President of ACR Manufacturing Incorporated and the subsidiary Apature Industries [5]. The company grew to be 2nd only to Monster cable by the early 1980s. Although she was groomed since childhood to manage the corporation, her desire was to go to college. Against her father's wishes, Marcia moved in 1988 to attend college. She attended Ricks College in Rexburg, Idaho where she learned WordPerfect. She continued studies at Scottsdale Community College after her father's sudden passing. She worked in Computer Services at Kinkos in Nevada in the mid 1990s. Kinkos had recently been a party in a copyright litigation. There she learned more about copyright law.

Writing[edit]

Marcia was contributing editor for Suite 101 in the Computing Life section from 1999 through 2002 where she wrote articles relating to computing and computer law. Editor for DMOZ copyright section 2001-2002. In 2000 she participated in Openlaw DVD discuss. She assisted Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society through participation and in writing an amicus curae for the 2600 v. MPAA case. As an intern for the Free Software Foundation and a Committee Member of the Digital Speech Project there, she worked with various members in an effort to promote free speech. She has written articles for Binary Freedom, System Toolbox, and STC Phoenix Rough Draft [6]. In 2003, she volunteered for EFF and IPJustice. At the EFF under the direction of Cory Doctorow, she drafted a DMCA FAQ for the EFF DMCA blog. This FAQ ultimately lead to the book - A Decade of the DMCA [7]. In 2008, Marcia spoke at the Last Hope. The presentation was given a similar title: A Decade Under the DMCA. [8]

Protests[edit]

In 2000, she attended the first DMCA protest in Washington D.C. and maintained the first DMCA protest site, DMCASucks.org [9] to inform the public about the law, current cases and impact on society. This site is no longer maintained.

Education and Work[edit]

She was educated at Three Rivers College in Norwich, Connecticut in computer science and Arizona State University in Technical Communications. In Spring semester 2000, Marcia enrolled at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society. There she took two courses - Intellectual Property in Cyberspace and Violence Against Women. She attended the conference - "Signal or Noise: The future of music on the net" as part of the curricula. In the same timeframe, she was on freenode IRC and a regular member of the /. channel (#slashot).

In May 2008, Marcia received a MS in Technology from Arizona State University. Marcia Wilbur worked at Microchip Technology for 4 years: 1 as a QA consultant in IS and 3 years full-time in the SMTD ( Security, Microcontroller, and Technology Development Division) Department. In 2009, she voluntarily terminated her employment with Microchip and is currently working as a professor.

Volunteer and Public Services[edit]

1990-1991 Scottsdale Community College Senator for Math and Science

1998 Arizona State University ASASU Senator for the college of engineering and applied sciences

1998 Volunteer IEEE Computer Science Library

2000- 2004 Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society [1]

2002-2003 Intern Free Software Foundation

2003 Volunteer IP Justice

2003 Volunteer Electronic Frontier Foundation

2012 Apache Foundation

2013 Free Culture Trust [2]

2014 W3C WebID [3]

2014 Copper Linux User Group Interim President [4]

Bibliography[edit]

Non-fiction

References[edit]