Marcus Hellner

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Marcus Hellner
Marcus Hellner 2013.jpg
Born (1985-11-25) 25 November 1985 (age 33)
Lerdala, Sweden
Height1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Ski clubGellivare Skidallians IK
World Cup career
Seasons2006–2018
Individual wins5
Indiv. podiums26
Overall titles0 – (3rd in 2009/10)
Discipline titles0 – (3rd in DI in 2009/10)

Carl Marcus Joakim Hellner (born 25 November 1985) is a Swedish cross-country skier who has been competing since 2003. He retired at the end of the 2017-18 FIS World Cup season.[1]

Hellner at the Royal Palace Sprint, Stockholm (2013)

Athletic career[edit]

Hellner had a total of seven victories in the junior levels of cross-country skiing up to 30 km from 2003 to 2005. In Gällivare, Sweden, he took his first world cup win on a 15 km event.

Hellner won bronze, his first medal, in the 4 × 10 km at the 2007 FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Sapporo.

In the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Hellner won his first Olympic gold medal in the 30 km cross-country pursuit, deciding the race in a sprint at the end. At the 4 × 10 km classic/free, Hellner took gold for Sweden after leading the race from the very start.

In the 2011 FIS Nordic World Ski Championships in Oslo, Hellner opened his championship with winning a victory in the men's sprint. A couple of days later, Hellner, like in the 2010 Winter Olympics, rode the last lap for Sweden in the 4 × 10 km relay. This time finishing second, winning a silver medal for Sweden.

In the 2012, Hellner became the first Swedish male skier to be on the podium in Tour de Ski by securing a second place overall after passing Petter Northug in the final uphill event.[2]

At the 2014 Winter Olympics Hellner won a silver medal at the 30 km skiathlon and a gold in the men's 4 × 10 km relay, skiing the last leg.

On 6 May 2018, his retirement from cross–country skiing was announced.[3]

World Cup results[edit]

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[4]

Season standings[edit]

 Season   Age  Season Standings Ski Tour Standings
Overall Distance Sprint Nordic
Opening
Tour de
Ski
World Cup
Final
Ski Tour
Canada
2006 20 N/A N/A N/A N/A
2007 21 114 81 73 N/A 50 N/A N/A
2008 22 53 45 41 N/A 36 N/A
2009 23 21 17 35 N/A WD 8 N/A
2010 24 3 3 15 N/A 4 3 N/A
2011 25 7 7 15 4 14 WD N/A
2012 26 4 8 34 6 2 9 N/A
2013 27 9 11 53 12 5 23 N/A
2014 28 17 15 82 7 6 N/A
2015 29 19 14 11 N/A N/A
2016 30 30 27 64 N/A 10
2017 31 6 8 40 6 6 6 N/A
2018 32 26 22 40 19 WD 13 N/A

Individual podiums[edit]

  • 5 victories – (2 WC, 3 SWC)
  • 26 podiums – (10 WC, 16 SWC)
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1 2008–09 22 November 2008 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
2 21 March 2009 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km + 10 km Pursuit C/F Stage World Cup 2nd
3  2009–10  12 December 2009 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
4 1 January 2010 Germany Oberhof, Germany 3.7 km Individual F Stage World Cup 2nd
5 4 January 2010 Czech Republic Prague, Czech Republic 1.2 km Sprint F Stage World Cup 2nd
6 6 January 2010 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 3rd
7 10 January 2010 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 10 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
8 14 March 2010 Norway Oslo, Norway 1.0 km Sprint F World Cup 3rd
9 21 March 2010 Sweden World Cup Final Overall Standings World Cup 3rd
10 2010–11 20 November 2010 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
11 28 November 2010 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 15 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 3rd
12 31 December 2010 Germany Oberhof, Germany 3.75 km Individual F Stage World Cup 1st
13 6 January 2011 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
14  2011–12  8 January 2012 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 9 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 3rd
15 29 December 2011
– 8 January 2012
GermanyItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 2nd
16  2012–13  24 November 2012 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
17 29 December 2012 Germany Oberhof, Germany 4 km Individual F Stage World Cup 2nd
18 6 January 2013 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 9 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 1st
19  2013–14  1 December 2013 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 15 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 3rd
20 1 February 2014 Italy Toblach, Italy 15 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
21 16 March 2014 Sweden Falun, Sweden 15 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
22  2014–15  15 February 2015 Sweden Östersund, Sweden 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
23  2015–16  11 March 2016 Canada Canmore, Canada 15 km Individual F Stage World Cup 3rd
24  2016–17  3 December 2016 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 10 km Individual F Stage World Cup 2nd
25 21 January 2017 Sweden Ulricehamn, Sweden 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
26 19 March 2017 Canada Quebec City, Canada 15 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 1st

Team podiums[edit]

  • 1 victory – (1 RL)
  • 10 podiums – (9 RL, 1 TS)
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place Teammate(s)
1 2007–08 28 October 2007 Germany Düsseldorf, Germany 6 × 1.5 km Team Sprint F World Cup 3rd Jönsson
2 9 December 2007 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 4 × 10 km Relay M World Cup 3rd Larsson / Olsson / Södergren
3 2008–09 23 November 2008 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Rickardsson / Olsson / Andreasson
4 7 December 2008 France La Clusaz, France 4 × 10 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Rickardsson / Olsson / Södergren
5 2010–11 21 November 2010 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay M World Cup 1st Larsson / Olsson / Rickardsson
6 2011–12 20 November 2011 Norway Sjusjøen, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay M World Cup 3rd Rickardsson / Olsson / Halfvarsson
7 12 February 2012 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 4 × 10 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Rickardsson / Olsson / Södergren
8 2012–13 25 November 2012 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 × 7.5 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Jönsson / Olsson / Rickardsson
9 20 January 2013 France La Clusaz, France 4 × 7.5 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Rickardsson / Olsson / Halfvarsson
10 2016–17 21 January 2017 Sweden Ulricehamn, Sweden 4 × 7.5 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Rickardsson / Olsson / Halfvarsson

Personal life[edit]

Hellner participated in the 2010 World Series of Poker main event. In March 2012, Hellner joined Team Pokerstars SportsStars alongside Mats Sundin and Boris Becker.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Marcus Hellner has retired". 7 May 2018. Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  2. ^ "Dario Cologna takes his third Tour de Ski victory". 8 January 2012. Archived from the original on 11 January 2012. Retrieved 9 January 2012.
  3. ^ "Hellner lägger skidorna på hyllan" (in Swedish). Göteborgsposten. 6 May 2018. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  4. ^ "HELLNER Marcus". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 21 January 2018.

External links[edit]