Marcus Molinaro

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Marc Molinaro
Marc Molinaro.jpg
Executive of Dutchess County
Assumed office
January 1, 2012
Preceded by William Steinhaus
Member of the New York Assembly
from the 103rd district
In office
January 1, 2007 – December 31, 2011
Preceded by Patrick Manning
Succeeded by Didi Barrett
Member of the Dutchess County Legislature
In office
January 1, 2001 – December 31, 2006
Preceded by Frances Mark
Succeeded by David Seymour
Mayor of Tivoli
In office
January 1, 1995 – December 31, 2006
Preceded by Woody Neese
Succeeded by Tom Cordier
Personal details
Born Yonkers, New York, U.S.
Political party Republican
Education Dutchess Community College

Marcus J. Molinaro is an American politician who currently serves as Dutchess County Executive. When Molinaro was elected mayor of Tivoli, New York in 1995 at the age of 19, he became the youngest mayor in the United States. A Republican, Molinaro went on to serve in the Dutchess County Legislature and the New York State Assembly before being elected Dutchess County Executive for the first time in 2011.

Molinaro is the 2018 Republican nominee for Governor of New York.

Early life[edit]

Molinaro was born in Yonkers, New York in 1975. His family moved to Beacon, New York, in 1980, and to Tivoli, New York, in 1989.[1] Molinaro graduated from Dutchess Community College in 2001.[2]

Political career[edit]

Molinaro was first elected to public office at the age of 18 in 1994, when he was elected to the Village of Tivoli's Board of Trustees.[3] In 1995, he became the youngest mayor in the United States when he was elected Mayor of Tivoli.[4] Molinaro was re-elected mayor five times, and was then elected to the Dutchess County Legislature four times.[5] In 2006, he was elected to represent the 103rd District in the New York State Assembly.[6] Molinaro served in the Assembly until 2011. In January 2011, at the recommendation of Assembly Minority Leader Brian Kolb, Governor Andrew Cuomo appointed Molinaro to serve on the Governor's Mandate Relief Redesign Team.[7]

Molinaro announced his bid to succeed twenty-year Dutchess County Executive William Steinhaus in May 2011. The campaign was endorsed by the county's Republican, Conservative, and Independence parties. On June 3, Beekman supervisor Dan French was nominated as the Assemblyman's Democratic challenger. Molinaro prevailed on November 8, 2011 with 62% of the vote.[8] Molinaro was sworn into office on January 1, 2012. In 2015, Molinaro was re-elected to a second term, defeating Democratic challenger Diane Jablonski by a significant margin.[9]

In 2014, Molinaro was awarded the Pace University Land Use Law Center’s Groundbreaker’s Award.[10] As County Executive, Molinaro spearheaded a 2015 initiative called "Think Differently" for people with disabilities; he also appointed a Deputy Commissioner of Special Needs in 2016.[11] In 2015, Molinaro was elected Second Vice President of the New York State Association of Counties.[12]

In March 2018, Molinaro informed Republican leaders that he would run for Governor of New York in the 2018 election.[13] On April 2, 2018, he announced his gubernatorial candidacy.[14] On May 23, 2018, the Republican Party unanimously nominated Molinaro as its candidate for Governor of New York at its state convention.[15] On April 13, 2018, the Conservative Party executive committee selected Molinaro as its gubernatorial endorsee.[16]

Personal life[edit]

Molinaro and his wife, Corinne, have three children and reside in Red Hook, New York.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Barry, John (April 2, 2018). "Marc Molinaro: A Timeline of his career". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  2. ^ Barry, John (April 2, 2018). "Marc Molinaro: A Timeline of his career". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  3. ^ Barry, John (April 2, 2018). "Marc Molinaro: A Timeline of his career". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  4. ^ Segers, Grace (April 3, 2018). "5 things to know about Marcus Molinaro". City & State New York. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  5. ^ Barry, John (April 2, 2018). "Marc Molinaro: A Timeline of his career". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  6. ^ De Avila, Joseph (May 23, 2018). "New York Republicans Nominate Dutchess County's Marc Molinaro for Governor". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  7. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces Members Of The Mandate Relief Redesign Team". Retrieved March 10, 2018. 
  8. ^ "DUTCHESS COUNTY EXECUTIVE RESULTS: Molinaro beats French handily". Dailyfreeman.com. Retrieved January 4, 2017. 
  9. ^ Ferro, John (November 3, 2015). "Molinaro wins reelection as DC executive". Dailyfreeman.com. Retrieved March 10, 2018. 
  10. ^ Barry, John (April 2, 2018). "Marc Molinaro: A Timeline of his career". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  11. ^ Segers, Grace (April 3, 2018). "5 things to know about Marcus Molinaro". City & State New York. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  12. ^ Barry, John (April 2, 2018). "Marc Molinaro: A Timeline of his career". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved September 16, 2018. 
  13. ^ "Molinaro tells more GOP leaders he's running for NY governor". NorthCountryPublicRadio.org. March 8, 2018. Retrieved March 10, 2018. 
  14. ^ John W. Barry and Joseph Spector (April 2, 2018). "Marc Molinaro: Candidate for governor cites "rendezvous with destiny"". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved April 2, 2018. 
  15. ^ Blain, Glenn. "Marcus Molinaro accepts New York GOP nomination for governor - NY Daily News". Retrieved August 31, 2018. 
  16. ^ Lovett, Kenneth. "NYS Conservative Party leaders back Molinaro for governor - NY Daily News". Retrieved May 22, 2018. 
  17. ^ "County Executive Marc Molinaro, Wife Corinne Welcome Baby Boy". Northwest Dutchess Daily Voice. Retrieved April 3, 2018. 

External links[edit]

New York Assembly
Preceded by
Patrick Manning
Member of the New York Assembly
from the 103rd district

2007–2011
Succeeded by
Didi Barrett
Political offices
Preceded by
William Steinhaus
Executive of Dutchess County
2012–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Rob Astorino
Republican nominee for Governor of New York
2018
Most recent