Marcus Robinson (American football)

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Marcus Robinson
No. 88, 87
Position: Wide Receiver
Personal information
Born: (1975-02-27) February 27, 1975 (age 43)
Fort Valley, Georgia
Career information
High school: Fort Valley (GA) Peach County
College: South Carolina
NFL Draft: 1997 / Round: 4 / Pick: 108
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career NFL statistics
Receptions: 325
Receiving yards: 4,699
Receiving touchdowns: 43
Player stats at NFL.com

Marcus Robinson (born February 27, 1975) is a former American football player in the NFL, who played the position of wide receiver.

He has played for the Chicago Bears, the Baltimore Ravens, and the Minnesota Vikings, as well as the Rhein Fire. He founded the Marcus Robinson Foundation for underprivileged children.

Early life[edit]

Robinson was born in Fort Valley, Georgia and attended Peach County High School in Fort Valley, where he starred in football and track. In football, he won All-America and All-State honors as a wide receiver, free safety, and punter. In track, he won regional titles on the 100 and 200 meter dashes.

College career[edit]

Robinson played wide receiver at the University of South Carolina.

Professional career[edit]

Robinson was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the 4th round (108th overall) of the 1997 NFL Draft.[1] He missed his rookie season with a thumb injury. In 1998, Robinson played with the Rhein Fire of NFL Europe during the NFL the offseason. He led the NFL Europe league in receiving yards, won the season MVP award, and won the championship at World Bowl '98. [2]

Robinson had a successful season in 1999 with the Bears, setting a team record with 1,400 receiving yards which stood until the record was broken by Brandon Marshall in 2012.[3] Injuries forced him into a journeyman role for the rest of his career.

As a Baltimore Raven in 2003, Robinson caught four touchdown passes in an overtime win over the Seattle Seahawks. He was expected to be resigned, but the Ravens wanted their first star at wide receiver, so Robinson was let a free agent. He was the leading wide receiver for the Minnesota Vikings the previous three years before he was inexplicably cut on Christmas Eve, 2006. The unusual move came a day after the St. Paul Pioneer Press published an interview with Robinson in which he expressed displeasure with the Vikings' 6-9-1 record.[4]

He signed a one-day contract with the Chicago Bears in June 2008, citing his desire to retire with the team that gave him his first chance in pro football. He officially retired on June 9, 2008.

Life after the NFL[edit]

Robinson is currently working as a physical trainer for young athletes, and he is the wide receiver coach for the Saint Viator football team in Arlington Heights, Illinois. He is also the sprint coach for the Marian Hurricanes track team in Woodstock, Illinois.

Personal life[edit]

His nephew, Demarcus Robinson, is a wide receiver in the NFL and was selected in the fourth round of the 2016 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs.[5]

Career stats[edit]

Year Team Rec Yds TD
1998 Chicago Bears 5 44 1
1999 Chicago Bears 84 1400 9
2000 Chicago Bears 55 738 5
2001 Chicago Bears 23 269 2
2002 Chicago Bears 21 244 3
2003 Baltimore Ravens 31 451 6
2004 Minnesota Vikings 47 657 8
2005 Minnesota Vikings 31 515 5
2006 Minnesota Vikings 29 381 4
325 4699 43

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Marcus Robinson". Pro-Football-Reference.Com. Retrieved September 2, 2012. 
  2. ^ Isaacson, Melissa (1999-10-21). "Robinson Finally Catching On". www.chicagotribune.com. Retrieved July 21, 2018. 
  3. ^ McManaman, Bob (2012-12-23). "Bears 28, Cardinals 13". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 2012-12-23. 
  4. ^ Siefert, Kevin & Zulgad, Judd (2006-12-24). "Vikings: Robinson gets Christmas pink slip" (Newspaper article). Minneapolis Star Tribune. Retrieved 2006-12-25. 
  5. ^ Andrew Abramson (February 25, 2016). "Gators WR Demarcus Robinson says he's a new man after drug suspensions". DailyDolphin.blog.PalmBeachPost.com. Retrieved January 6, 2018. 

External links[edit]