Mardi Gras World

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Leviathan float, Krewe of Orpheus, Mardi Gras World

Mardi Gras World (also known as Blaine Kern's Mardi Gras World, MGW) is a tourist attraction located in New Orleans. Guests tour the 300,000 square foot working warehouse where floats are made for Mardi Gras parades in New Orleans.[1] Mardi Gras World is located along the Mississippi River, next to the Morial Convention Center. Their events venue, the River City Complex, also hosts festivals, weddings, private parties and corporate events.[2]

History[edit]

In 1946, Blaine Kern, Sr. founded Blaine Kern Artists. Kern came from a family of float builders, but began creating floats after 1947, when a surgeon and krewe captain who had seen a mural by Kern hired him to create floats for the Krewe of Alla.[3] Kern's business expanded from there.[4] Kern, who traveled to Europe to learn float building techniques, has gained an international reputation in float building, with floats beyond New Orleans for Las Vegas, NV; Mobile, AL; Galveston, TX; Montreal, Canada; and the Universal Studios Mardi Gras parade.[5]

In 1984, Mardi Gras World was created as a tourist attraction to show visitors a behind-the-scenes look at float building.[6]

In the late 2000s Mardis Gras World nearly quadrupled in size, expanding from 80,000 to 300,000 square feet.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mary Foster (January 25, 2010). "Mardi Gras World float factory celebrates Carnival all year long". USA Today. Retrieved 2016-11-19. 
  2. ^ "Mardi Gras World Venues". Mardi Gras World. Retrieved 2015-04-30. 
  3. ^ "History". kernstudios.com. Kern Studios. Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  4. ^ Guinto, Joseph. "Dream Factory". American Way. Archived from the original on 2011-09-11. Retrieved 2011-10-10. 
  5. ^ "Universal Studios". Mardi Gras Parade. Retrieved 2011-10-25. 
  6. ^ "Tours". Mardi Gras World. 
  7. ^ Jen DeGregorio (January 30, 2008). "Mardi Gras World plans expansion". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2016-11-19. 

External links[edit]