Margaret Grey

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Margaret Grey
Spouse(s) William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville
Issue
William Bonville
Philippa Bonville
Elizabeth Bonville
Margaret Bonville
Noble family Grey
Father Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn
Mother Margaret de Ros
Born unknown
Ruthin Castle, Denbighshire, Wales
Died between May 1426 and Sept. 1427

Margaret Grey (died after May 1426 and before Oct. 1427)[1] was a Cambro-Norman noblewoman, the daughter of Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn, a powerful Welsh Marcher Lord, who was the implacable enemy of Owain Glyndŵr.

Margaret was the first wife of Sir William Bonville, later the 1st Baron Bonville who was decapitated by Queen consort Margaret of Anjou following the Yorkist defeat at the Second Battle of St Albans. Margaret was the great-grandmother of Cecily Bonville who succeeded to the estates and baronies of Bonville and Harington, thus becoming the wealthiest heiress in England.[2]

Family[edit]

Margaret Grey was born in Ruthin Castle, Denbighshire, Wales on an unknown date, the eldest daughter of Reginald Grey, 3rd Baron Grey de Ruthyn and Margaret de Ros. She had three brothers and two younger sisters. Her eldest brother was Sir John Grey KG who married Constance Holland, the granddaughter of John of Gaunt. Her paternal grandparents were Reginald Grey, 2nd Baron Grey de Ruthyn and Alianore Le Strange of Blackmere, and her maternal grandparents were Thomas de Ros, 4th Baron de Ros and Beatrice Stafford.

Her father was a powerful Marcher Lord of the Welsh Marches. It was his dispute with Owain Glyndŵr over a piece of moorland called the common of Croisau that caused the latter's rebellion against King Henry IV of England.[3] Margaret's father was taken prisoner by Glyndŵr in January 1402, and ransomed for the sum of 10,000 marks which was paid by King Henry.[4] In September 1400, the town of Ruthin had been razed to the ground by the Welsh in revenge for the destruction of Glyndŵr's manor of Sycharth by Grey and his men,[5] however, the castle was left standing, and its inhabitants unharmed.

On 7 February 1415, her father married secondly, Joan de Astley, by whom he had another six children.

Marriage and issue[edit]

On 12 December 1414, Margaret Grey married Sir William Bonville (30 August 1393 – 18 February 1461), the son of John Bonville and Elizabeth FitzRoger. She was his first wife. They made their home at the Manor of Chewton Mendip, in Somerset, and together they had one son and three daughters: [6] [7] [8]

  • William Bonville (died 30 December 1460), married Elizabeth Harington, by whom he had one son, William Bonville, 6th Baron Harington of Aldingham, who in his turn married Katherine Neville; they were the parents of Cecily Bonville, Marchioness of Dorset. William Bonville and his son, Baron Harington were both executed on the battlefield by orders of Margaret of Anjou, following the Battle of Wakefield.
  • Philippa Bonville (died after 1464), married firstly after 12 May 1427 (as his 2nd wife) William Grenville (died c. 1450), Esq., of Bideford, Devon and Kilkhampton, Cornwall, younger son of Sir Theobald Grenville II, of Bideford, Devon and Kilkhampton, Cornwall, by his wife, Margaret. They had three sons and two daughters. Philippa Bonville married secondly by 1451, John Almescombe, Esq. [9][10] [11] [12]
    • Sir Thomas Grenville I
    • John Grenville, Gent.
    • William Grenville
    • Margaret Grenville (wife of John Thorne)
    • Ellen Grenville (wife of William Yeo)
  • Elizabeth Bonville (died 14 February 1491), married Sir William Tailboys, by whom she had at least one son, Sir Robert Tailboys (1451- 10 January 1495). Sir Robert was an ancestor of Virginian colonist, Colonel George Reade.
  • Margaret Bonville (died before July 1487), wife of Sir William Courtenay (c. 1428 – September 1485) of Powderham (Bonville's ally against the latter's cousin the Earl of Devon of Tiverton Castle), by whom she had four sons and one daughter:[13]
    • Sir William Courtenay,
    • Edward Courtenay,
    • Philip Courtenay
    • James Courtenay
    • Joan Courtenay, wife of Sir William Carew (born c. 1483).

Margaret Grey's husband, Sir William Bonville, was knighted before 1417 during the campaigns in France of King Henry V. He was Knight of the Shire for Somerset in 1421, and for Devon in 1422, 1425 and 1427. In 1423, he was appointed by the king as Sheriff of Devon. On 8 February 1461, he was elected as a Knight of the Garter. [14] [15]

Margaret Grey herself died sometime after May 1426. Her husband married secondly on 9 October 1427, Elizabeth Courtenay, the daughter of Edward Courtenay, 3rd Earl of Devon. Sir William Bonville and Elizabeth Courtenay had no issue. Sir William Bonville was elevated to the peerage in 1449 as the 1st Baron Bonville.

The Bonvilles were staunch Yorkist supporters during the Wars of the Roses. William and Margaret's son, William and their grandson, William, 6th Baron Harington of Aldingham were both executed immediately after the Battle of Wakefield by Margaret of Anjou, who headed the Lancastrian contingent. On 17 February 1461, William, 1st Baron Bonville was taken prisoner after another Yorkist defeat at the Second Battle of St Albans. Queen Margaret, remembering that Baron Bonville was one of the men who had taken King Henry VI into custody after the Battle of Northampton, ordered his execution the next day.

Margaret Grey's great-granddaughter, Cecily Bonville, less than a year old, inherited the Bonville titles and estates, becoming the suo jure 2nd Baroness Bonville, and suo jure 7th Baroness Harington of Aldingham. On 18 July 1474, she married Thomas Grey, 1st Marquess of Dorset, a descendant of Margaret's father, by his second marriage to Joan de Astley.

References[edit]

  1. ^ www,thePeerage.com/p.13755.htm#137542
  2. ^ Britannia:Lympstone From Roman Times to the 17th Century. The early history of Lympstone (Devon), edited by Rosemary Smith. Retrieved 23-02-1
  3. ^ Thomas B. Costain, pp.252-58
  4. ^ Costain, pp.257-58
  5. ^ Costain, pp.253-54
  6. ^ Faris Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth-Century Colonists 1st ed. (1996): p. 28 [BONVILLE 9].
  7. ^ Cokayne Complete Peerage v. 2 (1912): p. 218 (author states in footnote (d), "She [i.e. 5] is generally said to be 'da. and h. of (-) MERRIETT.' See Maclean's *Trigg Minor*; but this is apparently a mistake for the wife of Lord Bonville's grandfather, i.e., Margaret, da. of Sir William d'Aumale, cousin and h. of Sir John Meriet, junior, which Margaret d. 25 May 1399. ...") (It would seem that Margaret Meriet is a confusion with Sir William Bonville II, first Lord Bonville's, grandfather’s (William Bonville I) wife, Margaret, daughter of Sir William d’Aumale, cousin and heir of Sir John Meriet, junior) (Margaret, da. of Meriet was correctly identified as Margaret dau. of Reynold Grey, Knt., 3rd Lord Grey of Ruthin and his 1st wife, Margaret de Ros) (identification of William Bonville’s 1st wife, Margaret Grey, made by Robert Behra based on Calendar Close Rolls, 1413-1419, p. 199).
  8. ^ Vivian Vis. of Devon 1531, 1564, & 1620 (1895): pp. 101-103, [see Bonville pedigree] (author states, “Phillipa, mar. 1 William Grenville of Bideford,” and places her as the daughter of Sir William Bonville of Chewton and Margaret, da. of … Meriet) (author states, “Margaret, mar. Sir William Courtenay of Powderham,” and places her as the daughter of Sir William Bonville of Chewton and Margaret, da. of … Meriet) (see previous footnote for correct identification of Margaret, da. of Meriet).
  9. ^ Roskell The History of Parliament: The House of Commons 1386-1421 v. 2 (1992): pp. 284-288 (biog. of Sir William Bonville II: “These ties were to be strengthened by the marriage of Bonville’s son and heir, William, to Lord Harrington’s only child, and of two of his daughters, Philippa and Margaret, respectively to William Grenville ... and William Courtenay ... ”).
  10. ^ Rogers Strife of the Roses & Days of the Tudors in the West (1890): pp. 47–48 (author identifies Philippa Bonville, wife of William Grenville, as the daughter of William Bonville, first Lord Bonville).
  11. ^ Pole Collections Towards a Description of the County of Devon (1791): pp. 387-388 (Grenville descent of the Manor of Bideford) “Wilm Grenvill his brother maried Thomazin, & unto his 2 wief Phelip, daughter of Wilm Lord Bonvill, & had issue Sr Thomas, ... ”).
  12. ^ Weis The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215 fifth ed. (1999): p. 29 [Line 22-10] (author places Philippa Bonville in the wrong generation) (see, Vivian Vis. of Devon 1531, 1564, & 1620 (1895): pp. 101-103, Bonville pedigree) (author states, “Phillipa, mar. 1 William Grenville of Bideford,” and places her as the dau. of Sir William Bonville of Chewton and Margaret, da. of … Meriet.) (Margaret, da. of Meriet was correctly identified as Margaret dau. of Reynold Grey, Knt., 3rd Lord Grey of Ruthin and his 1st wife, Margaret de Ros) (identification of William Bonville’s 1st wife, Margaret Grey, made by Robert Behra based on Calendar Close Rolls, 1413-1419, p. 199) (see Cokayne Complete Peerage v. 2 (1912): p. 218, author states in footnote (d), "She [i.e. 5] is generally said to be 'da. and h. of (-) MERRIETT.' See Maclean's *Trigg Minor*; but this is apparently a mistake for the wife of Lord Bonville's grandfather, i.e., Margaret, da. of Sir William d'Aumale, cousin and h. of Sir John Meriet, junior, which Margaret d. 25 May 1399. ...") (it would seem that Margaret Meriet is a confusion with Sir William Bonville II, first Lord Bonville's, grandfather’s (Sir William Bonville I) wife, Margaret, daughter of Sir William d’Aumale, cousin and heir of Sir John Meriet, junior).
  13. ^ Vivian Vis. of Devon 1531, 1564, & 1620 (1895): pp. 101-103, [see Bonville pedigree] (author states, “Margaret, mar. Sir William Courtenay of Powderham,” and places her as the daughter of Sir William Bonville of Chewton and Margaret, da. of … Meriet) (see previous footnote for correct identification of Margaret, da. of Meriet).
  14. ^ Roskell The History of Parliament: The House of Commons 1386-1421 v. 2 (1992): pp. 284-288 (biog. of Sir William Bonville II: “After witnessing the deaths of both his son and grandson at the débâcle at Wakefield on 30 Dec. (when York, too, was killed) he joined the earl of Warwick in London, where, in a chapter held on 8 Feb. 1461, the two of them were elected Knights of the Garter.”).
  15. ^ Cokayne Complete Peerage v. 2 (1912): p. 218

16. Weis, Frederick Lewis "The Magna Charta Sureties, 1215" third ed. (1985): p. 16 [Line 22-10] (author states, "Sir William Grenville, of Biddeford, d. c. 1451; m. Philippa, dau. of Sir William Bonville, K.G., Lord Bonville, of Chewton-Mendip, near Wells Somerset.").

  • www.thePeerage.com/p. 13755.htm#137542
  • Thomas B. Costain, The Last Plantagenets, published by Popular Library, New York, 1962