Margaret Noodin

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Margaret Noodin
Born 1965
Other names Margaret Noori
Occupation Poet, college professor
Employer University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

Margaret Noodin (previously Margeret Noori, born 1965) is an American poet and Anishinaabemowin language teacher. She is an Assistant Professor of English and American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.[1]

Education[edit]

Noodin holds an MFA in Creative Writing and a PhD in English and Linguistics, both received at the University of Minnesota.[2] Her doctoral dissertation is titled Native American Literature in tribal context: Anishinaabe Aadisokaanag Noongom (2001).[3]

Life and career[edit]

Noodin, who is of Anishinaabe descent, is the editor of ojibwe.net.[4] She led a weekly Ojibwe language group at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, where she served as Director of Comprehensive Studies.[5][6]

She is the author of Bawaajimo: A Dialect of Dreams in Anishinaabe Language and Literature (2014) and Weweni: Poems in Anishinaabemowin and English (2015).

Works[edit]

Dissertation[edit]

  • Noori, Margaret Ann (2001). Native American Literature in tribal context : Anishinaabe Aadisokaanag Noongom. University of Minnesota. 

Articles and essays[edit]

  • Noori, Margaret (2010). "Native American Narratives from Early Art to Graphic Novels: How We See Stories / Ezhi-g'waabmaananig Aadizookaanag". In Aldama, Frederick Luis. Multicultural Comics: From Zap to Blue Beetle. University of Texas Press. ISBN 9780292739536. 
  • Noori, Margaret (2011). "Reading Queen of the Woods Today". Ogimawkwe Mitigwaki (Queen of the Woods). American Indian Studies. Michigan State University Press. pp. 57–76. ISBN 978-0870139871. 
  • Noori, Margaret (Summer 2011). "Waasechibiiwaabikoonsing Nd'anami'aami, 'Praying through a Wired Window': Using Technology to Teach Anishinaabemowin". Studies in American Indian Literatures. 23 (2): 3–24. doi:10.5250/studamerindilite.23.2.0003. ISSN 0730-3238. 
  • Noori, Margaret (2013). "Anishinaabemowin: Language, Family, and Community". In Hinton, Leanne. Bringing Our Languages Home: Language Revitalization for Families. Berkeley, California: Heyday. ISBN 9781597142007. 
  • Noori, Margaret (2013). "Beshaabiiag G'gikenmaaigowag: Comets of Knowledge". In Doerfler, Jill; Sinclair, N.J.; Stark, H.K. Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World through Stories. MSU Press. ISBN 9781609173531. 
  • Noodin, Margaret (2014). "Megwa Baabaamiiaayaayaang Dibaajomoyaang: Anishinaabe Literature as Memory in Motion". In Cox, James H.; Justice, Daniel Heath. The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0199914036. 

Books[edit]

  • Learning Ojibwe: Anishinaabemowin maajaamigad. With Kimewon, Howard. Owen Sound, Ont.: Ningwakwe Learning Press. 2009. ISBN 9781896832975. 
  • Bawaajimo: A Dialect of Dreams in Anishinaabe Language and Literature. American Indian Studies. Michigan State University Press. 2014. ISBN 978-1611861051. 
  • Weweni: Poems in Anishinaabemowin and English. Made in Michigan Writers Series. Wayne State University Press. 2015. ISBN 978-0814340387. 

Poetry online[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Margaret Noodin". uwm.edu. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Retrieved March 12, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Two Poems". Verse Wisconsin (113–114). Verse Wisconsin. April 2014. Retrieved March 14, 2015. 
  3. ^ Noori, Margaret Ann (2001). Native American Literature in tribal context: Anishinaabe Aadisokaanag Noongom. University of Minnesota. 
  4. ^ Emmanouilidou, Lydia (July 26, 2014). "For Rare Languages, Social Media Provide New Hope". All Things Considered. NPR. Retrieved March 12, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Univ. seeks to preserve native language". USATODAY.com. 2008. Retrieved 2014-05-02. 
  6. ^ Wang, Frances Kai-Hwa (2010-01-05). "Professor Margaret Noori discusses Native Americans of Michigan, the Three Fires Confederacy". The Ann Arbor News. Retrieved 2014-05-02. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]