Margo Burns

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Margo Burns is a historian (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1980, M.A., University of New Hampshire, 1991) specializing in the Salem witch trials and related events, especially those in North Andover.[1] She is an Associate Editor and Project Manager of the book Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt (Bernard Rosenthal, Editor, Cambridge University Press, 2009). She resides in New Hampshire.

Although not directly related to any of North Andover's witchcraft-accused, Burns is the great-x10-granddaughter of Rebecca Nurse,[2] one of the foremost protagonists of the trials in Salem;[1] it was Burns's initial interest in that controversy that led her to explore its North Andover analog. She puts the total accused there at 153.[1]

Burns appears in several history documentaries about the Salem witchcraft trials: "Salem Witch Hunt: Examine the Evidence" (2011)[3] for the Essex National Heritage Commission and the National Park Service,[4][5] and "Salem: Unmasking the Devil" (2011) with author Katherine Howe, discussing the case of Rebecca Nurse, for the National Geographic Channel.[6] It aired on the BBC under the alternate title "Salem Witch Trials Conspiracy".[7] In 2016, she appeared, along with historian Mary Beth Norton in Season 8, Episode 2, of the TLC cable television series, "Who Do You Think You Are?" discussing actor Scott Foley's ancestor, Samuel Wardwell of Andover, MA, who was one of the 19 people hanged for witchcraft during the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692. On June 10, 2017, Burns appeared with Emerson Baker, Marilynne K. Roach, and others at a symposium at Salem State University, in Salem, Massachusetts, commemorating the 325th anniversary of the events: "Salem’s Trials, Lessons and Legacy of 1692,"[8] which was recorded by C-SPAN 3 and aired on July 16, 2017.[9]

Further reading[edit]

  • Bridgman, Pat. "Don't believe everything you read in the (Salem witchcraft) papers". Newsletter of the Rebecca Nurse Homestead Preservation Society, Summer 2006.[10]
  • Burns, Margo, and Bernard Rosenthal. "Examination of the Records of the Salem Witch Trials". William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 65, No. 3 (2008). pp. 401–422.[11]
  • Chase, Elibet Moore. "Trials and Errors". University of New Hampshire Magazine, Spring 2004.[12]
  • Messenger, Brian. "Researcher unearths Andover's role in witchcraft trials." The Lawrence Eagle-Tribune, 26 October 2008.[13]
  • Rosenthal, Bernard, ed., et al. Records of the Salem Witch-Hunt. Cambridge UP, 2009. ISBN 978-0-521-66166-9

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Applegate, Sally (24 October 2008). "Why did witch history overlook North Andover?". North Andover Citizen. 
  2. ^ "My Lineage to Rebecca Nurse". 17thc.us. Retrieved 2018-03-15. 
  3. ^ Salem Witch Hunt: Examine the Evidence on IMDb
  4. ^ Macdonald, G. Jeffrey (8 November 2011). "Salem Witch Trials Get A Second Look". The Huffington Post. 
  5. ^ "Salem Witch Hunt:Examine the Evidence Premieres Oct. 4", Salem Gazette, September 30, 2011 [1]
  6. ^ [2][dead link]
  7. ^ "Homepage". 8 November 2017. 
  8. ^ "Legacy". salem.org. 
  9. ^ "Salem Witch Trials Legal Documents Project, Jun 10 2017 | Video | C-SPAN.org". C-SPAN.org. Retrieved 2018-03-15. 
  10. ^ "Wayback Machine" (PDF). 14 September 2007. 
  11. ^ Examination of the Records of the Salem Witch Trials at JStor
  12. ^ "Trials and Errors - Margo Burns". Unhmagazine.ubh.edu. Retrieved 2012-11-27. 
  13. ^ "Researcher unearths Andover's role in witchcraft trials » Merrimack Valley » EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA". Eagletribune.com. Archived from the original on 2013-01-21. Retrieved 2012-11-27.