Maria Bakunin

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Maria Bakunin (also known as Marussia Bakunin) was born in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, on 2 February 1873 and died in Naples on 17 April 1960. She was an Italian chemist and biologist, the daughter of the well-known revolutionary philosopher Mikhail Bakunin.

Education[edit]

Maria, even as a young student, became “preparer” at the Federico II University chemical laboratory in Naples, where in 1895 she graduated in chemistry with a degree thesis on stereochemistry.

Career[edit]

Following her graduation, Bakunin received the Academy prize for physica and mathematics in Naples in 1900.[1] In 1909 she went to work teaching applied chemistry at the Scuola Superiore Politecnica in Naples, where in 1912 she became Chair in Applied Technological Chemistry.[1]

Work in Earth Sciences[edit]

In 1906 Bakunin was part of a group studying the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, and in 1909 she compiled a geological map of Italy.[1] As part of the map project, she studied the oil shale and ichthyolithic deposits of mountains in the Salerno area of Italy. Following this, from 1911 until 1930, Bakunin worked as a consultant for local governments and companies interested in industrial development of ichthyol mines in the Giffoni district[1] (Monti Picentini).

Later career[edit]

After the Second World War, Bakunin worked with Benedetto Croce to rebuild the Accademia Pontaniana, and in 1944 she was elected its president.[1] In her capacity as president, Bakunin restored the Academy's library.[1]

Family[edit]

Bakunin was the aunt of the famous Neapolitan mathematician Renato Caccioppoli. The story tells that in 1938 Renato was imprisoned after he delivered a speech against Fascism but his aunt, Maria, was able to obtain his release by persuading the inquisitors on Renato capability of intents.

References[edit]

  • Nicolaus, Rodolfo Alessandro (2004). "Ricordo di Maria Bakunin". Atti dell'Accademia Pontaniana LII. Napoli. pp. 27–32. 
  • Mongillo, Pasqualina (2008). Marussia Bakunin, una donna nella storia della chimica. Rubbettino. 
  • English translation abstract by Manuela Baglivo
  • Ciardi, Marco; Focaccia, Miriam (2011). Apotheker, Jan; Sarkadi, Livia Simon, eds. Maria Bakunin (1873-1960). European Women in Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved 5 Dec 2011. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Ciardi, Marco; Focaccia, Miriam (2011). Apotheker, Jan; Sarkadi, Livia Simon, eds. Maria Bakunin (1873-1960). European Women in Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved 5 Dec 2011. 

External links[edit]