Maria Bakunin

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Maria Bakunin
Maria Bakunin.jpg
Born
Marija Mikhailovna Bakunina

(1873-02-02)February 2, 1873
Krasnoyarsk, Russia
DiedApril 17, 1960(1960-04-17) (aged 87)
Naples, Italy
NationalityRussian-Italian
Alma materUniversity of Naples Federico II
Scientific career
FieldsStereochemistry
Applied chemistry
Earth sciences
InstitutionsScuola Superiore Politecnica
Accademia Pontaniana
WebsiteOfficial website

Marija Mikhailovna Bakunina (also known as Marussia Bakunin) was born in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, on 2 February 1873 and died in Naples on 17 April 1960. She was a Russian-Italian chemist and biologist.

Education[edit]

Maria, even as a young student, became "preparer" at the Federico II University chemical laboratory in Naples, where in 1895 she graduated in chemistry with a degree thesis on stereochemistry.

Career[edit]

Following her graduation, Bakunin received the Academy prize for physics and mathematics in Naples in 1900.[1] In 1909 she went to work teaching applied chemistry at the Scuola Superiore Politecnica in Naples, where in 1912 she became Chair in Applied Technological Chemistry.[1]

Earth sciences[edit]

In 1906 Bakunin was part of a group studying the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius, and in 1909 she compiled a geological map of Italy.[1] As part of the map project, she studied the oil shale and ichthyolithic deposits of mountains in the Salerno area of Italy. Following this, from 1911 until 1930, Bakunin worked as a consultant for local governments and companies interested in industrial development of ichthyol mines in the Giffoni district[1] (Monti Picentini).

Later career[edit]

After the Second World War, Bakunin worked with Benedetto Croce to rebuild the Accademia Pontaniana, and in 1944 she was elected its president.[1] In her capacity as president, Bakunin restored the Academy's library.[1]

Family[edit]

Maria Bakunin was the daughter of the well-known revolutionary philosopher Mikhail Bakunin and the aunt of the famous Neapolitan mathematician Renato Caccioppoli. The story is told that in 1938 Renato was imprisoned after he delivered a speech against Fascism but his aunt, Maria, was able to obtain his release by persuading the inquisitors of Renato's capability.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Ciardi, Marco; Focaccia, Miriam (2011). Apotheker, Jan; Sarkadi, Livia Simon (eds.). Maria Bakunin (1873-1960). European Women in Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved 5 Dec 2011.

References[edit]

  • Nicolaus, Rodolfo Alessandro (2004). "Ricordo di Maria Bakunin". Atti dell'Accademia Pontaniana LII. Napoli. pp. 27–32.
  • Mongillo, Pasqualina (2008). Marussia Bakunin, una donna nella storia della chimica. Rubbettino.
  • English translation abstract by Manuela Baglivo
  • Ciardi, Marco; Focaccia, Miriam (2011). Apotheker, Jan; Sarkadi, Livia Simon (eds.). Maria Bakunin (1873-1960). European Women in Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons. Retrieved 5 Dec 2011.

External links[edit]