Mariame Kaba

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Mariame Kaba
ResidenceChicago, USA
Known forActivism
Websitehttp://mariamekaba.com/

Mariame Kaba is an American activist and organizer. She founded the organization Project NIA,[1] which advocates to end youth incarceration. She is the Co-Founder of the organizations Chicago Freedom School,[2] Chicago Taskforce on Violence against Girls and Young Women,[3][4] Chicago Alliance to Free Marissa Alexander,[5] Rogers Park Young Women’s Action Team (YWAT),[6] and We Charge Genocide (WCG).[7] Kaba co-chaired the Women of Color Committee at the Chicago Metropolitan Battered Women’s Network, was a board member on the Education for Liberation Network,[8] and served on the advisory board of Women and Girls Collective Action Network (WGCAN). She has been featured in articles by NPR,[9] Essence,[10] Poetry Foundation,[11] Broadly,[12] Bitch Media,[13] The Chicago Reader,[14] and made a guest appearance on Democracy NOW.[15][16]. In June 2018, she wrote the foreword for, As Black As Resistance: Finding the Conditions for Liberation, a critical book by Zoé Samudzi and William C. Anderson that describes the importance of Black anarchist and abolitionist principles to contemporary social justice movements. [17]

Awards[edit]

  • 2010 7th District Community Award from State Senator Heather Steans[18]
  • 2012 Courage Tour Award from A Long Walk Home[19]
  • 2013 Ed Marciniak Bright Star Award from the Bright Promises Foundation[20]
  • 2014 Impact Award from the Chicago Foundation for Women[21]
  • 2014 Women Who Dared Award from Chicago NOW[22]
  • 2014 Partner in Justice Award from Lawndale Christian Legal Center [23]
  • 2015 Women to Celebrate Award[24]
  • 2016 AERA Ella Baker/Septima Clark Human Rights Award[25]
  • 2016-2017 Soros Justice Fellow.[26]
  • 2017 Ron Sable Award for Activism[27]
  • 2017 Peace Award by War Resisters League[28]

Anti-violence projects[edit]

  • A World Without Prisons Art Exhibit[29] curated by Project NIA and Free Write Jail Arts & Literacy Program.[30]
  • Restorative Posters Project[31][32]
  • Co-curated No Selves to Defend.[33]
  • Co-curated Blood at the Root – Unearthing the Stories of State Violence Against Black Women and Girls.[34][35][36]
  • Co-curated Making Niggers: Demonizing and Distorting Blackness[37]
  • Co-curated Black/Inside. Black/Inside: A History of Captivity & Confinement in the U.S. Art Exhibit on display at African American Cultural Center Gallery[38]

Publications[edit]

  • "All of Chicago – not just its police – must see systemic change to save black lives." The Guardian.[39]
  • "For blacks, America is dangerous by default." The Washington Post.[40]
  • "Why I’m Raising Money To Build An Ida B. Wells Monument." The Huffington Post.[41]
  • "Where Twitter and Feminism Meet." The Nation.[42]
  • "How to Repair the Criminal Justice System." VICE.[43]
  • "To Live and Die in "Chiraq."" The End of Chiraq: A Literary Mixtape. Eds Javon Johnson and Kevin Coval. Northwestern University Press.[44]
  • "Bresha Meadows Returns Home After Collective Organizing Efforts." Teen Vogue.[45]
  • "For Mother's Day, Activists Are Bailing Black Mamas out of Jail." Broadly. [46]
  • Foreword, As Black As Resistance: Finding the Conditions for Liberation, by Zoé Samudzi and William C. Anderson. AK Press. 2018. [47]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Project NIA > About Us". project-nia.org. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  2. ^ "Chicago Freedom School". Chicago Freedom School. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  3. ^ "Chicago Taskforce on Violence Against Girls & Young Women". www.chitaskforce.org. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  4. ^ Harding, Kate (2015-08-25). Asking for It: The Alarming Rise of Rape Culture--and What We Can Do about It (in Arabic). Da Capo Press. ISBN 978-0-7382-17031.
  5. ^ "Chicago Alliance to Free Marissa Alexander". wordpress.com. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  6. ^ "Rogers Park Young Women's Action Team | Challenging Violence 24/7". www.rogersparkywat.org. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  7. ^ "We Charge Genocide". wechargegenocide.org. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  8. ^ "Education for Liberation Network". www.edliberation.org. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  9. ^ "People - Mariame Kaba". WNYC. WNYC - New York Public Radio, Podcasts, Live Streaming Radio, News. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  10. ^ "#WarriorWednesdays: Mariame Kaba Is Our Very Own Modern Day Abolitionist". Essence.com. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  11. ^ "Mariame Kaba". Poetry Foundation. 2018-07-24. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  12. ^ "'More Justice and Some Peace': Mariame Kaba on Ending America's Violence". Broadly. 2017-02-23. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  13. ^ "20 Black Women You Should Be Following Right Now". Bitch Media. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  14. ^ Dukmasova, Maya. "Abolish the police? Organizers say it's less crazy than it sounds". Chicago Reader. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  15. ^ "As NYPD Officers Are Charged with Rape of Teenager, Advocates Call for End to Mass Sexual Violence". Democracy Now!. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  16. ^ "How Domestic Violence and Militarism "Open the Floodgates" to Mass Shootings Like the Texas Massacre". Democracy Now!. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  17. ^ Samudzi, Zoé; Anderson, William C.; Kaba, Mariame (June 5, 2018). As Black As Resistance: Finding the Conditions for Liberation. Chico, California: AK Press. ISBN 9781849353168.
  18. ^ "Illinois State Senator Heather Steans". www.senatorsteans.com. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  19. ^ "A Long Walk Home | Stars Foundation". www.starsfoundation.org.uk. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  20. ^ "Awards". www.brightpromises.org. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  21. ^ "2018 Impact Awards - Chicago Foundation for Women". Chicago Foundation for Women. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  22. ^ "Join us for Women Who Dared 2014!". Chicago NOW. 2014-08-29. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  23. ^ "Lawndale Christian Legal Center". lclc.net. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  24. ^ "Women to Celebrate". Transformative Spaces. 2015-03-05. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  25. ^ "Awards". www.aera.net. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  26. ^ "Mariame Kaba". Open Society Foundations. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  27. ^ "Ron Sable Award for Activism | Crossroads Fund". crossroadsfund.org. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  28. ^ "WRL Peace Awards Recipients and Annual Dinner Speakers". War Resisters League. 2015-03-27. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  29. ^ "A World Without Prisons: A Conversation with Mariame Kaba". Lumpen Magazine. 2016-04-08. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  30. ^ Dubler, Joshua; Lloyd, Vincent (2018-05-19). "Think prison abolition in America is impossible? It once felt inevitable | Joshua Dubler and Vincent Lloyd". The Guardian. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  31. ^ "Restorative Posters | Representing Justice Visually". rjposters.com. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  32. ^ "The Art of Restorative Questions". Cultural Organizing. 2016-10-05. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  33. ^ "Disappearing Acts: Domestic Violence & Black Legal Subjects | UCB Center for Race & Gender". www.crg.berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  34. ^ "Prison Culture » Video: Blood at the Root Exhibition". www.usprisonculture.com. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  35. ^ "the art of the black lives matter movement". I-d. 2015-09-11. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  36. ^ "Rekia Boyd, Other Female Victims of Police Violence Honored in Exhibit". DNAinfo Chicago. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  37. ^ "Prison Culture » Making Niggers: Demonizing and Distorting Blackness". www.usprisonculture.com. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  38. ^ "Black/Inside". African American Cultural Center.
  39. ^ Kaba, Mariame (2015-12-28). "All of Chicago – not just its police – must see systemic change to save black lives | Mariame Kaba". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  40. ^ "For blacks, America is dangerous by default". Washington Post. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  41. ^ Kaba, Mariame (2018-05-02). "Why I'm Raising Money to Build an Ida B. Wells Monument". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  42. ^ Kaba, Mariame; Smith, Andrea; Adelman, Lori; Gay, Roxane. "Where Twitter and Feminism Meet | The Nation". ISSN 0027-8378. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  43. ^ "How to Repair the Criminal Justice System". Vice.com. 2015-10-05. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  44. ^ "The End of Chiraq | Northwestern University Press". www.nupress.northwestern.edu. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  45. ^ Mariame Kaba; Colby Lenz. "How We Worked to #FreeBresha Meadows from Incarceration". Teen Vogue. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  46. ^ "For Mother's Day, Activists Are Bailing Black Mamas out of Jail". Broadly. 2017-05-10. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  47. ^ Samudzi, Zoé; Anderson, William C.; Kaba, Mariame (June 5, 2018). As Black As Resistance: Finding the Conditions for Liberation. Chico, California: AK Press. ISBN 9781849353168.