Marie-Michèle Gagnon

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Marie-Michèle Gagnon
Alpine skier
DisciplinesSlalom, Combined,
Giant slalom, Super-G
ClubMont Orignal
Born (1989-04-25) 25 April 1989 (age 29)
Lac-Etchemin, Quebec, Canada
Height1.77 m (5 ft 10 in)
World Cup debut13 December 2008 (age 19)
Websitemariemichelegagnon.com
Olympics
Teams2 - (2010, 2014)
Medals0
World Championships
Teams6 - (20092019)
Medals0
World Cup
Seasons11 - (20092019)
Wins2 - (2 SC)
Podiums4 - (2 SL, 2 SC)
Overall titles0 - (13th in 2014)
Discipline titles1 - (SC, 2014)[A]

Marie-Michèle Gagnon (born 25 April 1989) is a World Cup alpine ski racer from Canada. Born in Lac-Etchemin, Quebec, she competes in four alpine disciplines, specialising in the technical events of slalom and giant slalom.

Career[edit]

Gagnon joined the Canadian national team at the age of 18, although her progress was halted by a leg fracture at the start of her rookie season.[1] She made her World Cup debut in December 2008 and has represented Canada at two Winter Olympics and six World Championships.

She attained her first World Cup podium in March 2012, a third-place finish in a slalom at Åre, Sweden.[2][3] Gagnon won her first World Cup event in January 2014, a combined event at Altenmarkt, Austria.[4] This was the first podium finish for a Canadian skier in a World Cup combined event for 30 years.[5] The previous day she scored her first World Cup points in downhill at the same venue.[6] That season she also took her first top ten World Cup finishes in super-G, finishing tenth and sixth in races in Lake Louise and St. Moritz respectively.[7] At the 2014 Winter Olympics, Gagnon crashed out of the slalom run of the combined, dislocating her shoulder,[8] before failing to finish the super-G and giant slalom, and securing a ninth place in the slalom. At the end of the season she finished in 13th place in the overall World Cup standings and sixth in the slalom rankings.[6]

Personal life[edit]

Gagnon was the third of five siblings, and left the family home at the age of 12 to pursue her education and ski racing in Mont-Sainte-Anne and Quebec City. Her childhood idols included Mélanie Turgeon, Geneviève Simard and Erik Guay.[1]

Gagnon has been in a relationship with American alpine skier Travis Ganong since 2008.[5][9] The pair met through mutual friend Louis-Pierre Hélie.[1] In 2014 the couple moved to a new home in Lake Tahoe, California.[7][6]

World Cup results[edit]

Season titles[edit]

Season Discipline
2014 Combined A

Season standings[edit]

Season Age  Overall   Slalom  Giant
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2009 19 73 33 35
2010 20 103 43
2011 21 29 22 16 49 15
2012 22 21 10 26 44 12
2013 23 21 17 23 32 4
2014 24 13 6 19 19 51    1 A
2015 25 28 11 34 31    5 A
2016 26 16 11 14 44 4
2017 27 20 13 16 21
2018 28 86 38 37
2019 29 42 19 19

A Crystal globes in combined were not awarded during these seasons, but medals were.[10]
Standings through 19 February 2019

Race podiums[edit]

  • 2 wins – (2 SC)
  • 4 podiums – (2 SL, 2 SC)
  • 47 top tens – (28 SL, 10 GS, 7 SC, 2 SG)
Season Date Location Discipline Place
2012 10 Mar 2012 Sweden Åre, Sweden Slalom 3rd
2014 12 Jan 2014 Austria Altenmarkt, Austria Super combined 1st
2016 15 Feb 2016  Switzerland  Crans-Montana, Switzerland Slalom 3rd
28 Feb 2016 Andorra Soldeu, Andorra Super combined 1st

World Championship results[edit]

  Year    Age   Slalom   Giant 
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2009 19 DNF1 DNF1
2011 21 DNF1 23 22 DNF2
2013 23 13 8
2015 25 10 23 DNF DNF1
2017 27 20 20 19 6
2019 29 23 21 32 14

Olympic results[edit]

  Year    Age   Slalom   Giant 
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2010 20 31 21
2014 24 9 DNF1 DNF DNF2
2018 28 Injured in November, missed rest of season

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bossé, Olivier (18 November 2017). "Marie-Michèle Gagnon: le feu de l'effort" [Marie-Michèle Gagnon: the fire of the effort]. Le Soleil (Quebec) (in French). Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  2. ^ Williams, Eric (10 March 2012). "Hoefl-Riesch regains slalom from with win in Are, Gagnon first podium in third". Ski Racing. Retrieved 24 March 2014.
  3. ^ Bouzane, Bradley (10 March 2012). "Marie-Michele Gagnon wins first World Cup medal". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 22 March 2012.
  4. ^ FIS Alpine (12 January 2014). "Altenmarkt – Super Combined". Retrieved 12 January 2014.
  5. ^ a b Reguly, Eric (9 February 2014). "Canada's Gagnon draws inspiration from boyfriend's run ahead of alpine Olympic debut". theglobeandmail.com. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  6. ^ a b c Drouin, Simon (31 March 2014). "Changement de cap pour Marie-Michèle Gagnon" [Change of course for Marie-Michèle Gagnon]. La Presse (Canadian newspaper) (in French). Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  7. ^ a b Gilbert, Manon (15 October 2014). "Le virage de Marie-Michèle Gagnon" [The turn of Marie-Michèle Gagnon]. Radio-Canada.ca (in French). Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  8. ^ Young, Leslie (10 February 2014). "Skier Marie-Michèle Gagnon dislocates shoulder, still plans to compete". globalnews.ca. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  9. ^ "Das WM-Liebespaar: Gagnon und Ganong" [The World Championship lovers: Gagnon and Ganong]. Kleine Zeitung (in German). 15 February 2017. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  10. ^ "Skiing to revive super-combined". ESPN. Associated Press. 5 October 2012. Retrieved 24 March 2014.

External links[edit]