Mario Pacheco

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Mario Pacheco (6 November 1950 – 26 November 2010) was a Spanish record producer, photographer and entrepreneur.[1][2]

Born in Madrid, Pacheco is regarded as an essential figure in the development of contemporary flamenco and other musical genres in Spain for more than two decades.[3]

In 1982 he founded Nuevos Medios, a record label that introduced numerous guitarists, singers and other flamenco notables through his vision in furthering the genre worldwide.[4] Besides this, he was also a professional photographer.[5]

At a time when flamenco music was unpopular, Pacheco signed many young musicians who renovated flamenco or mixed it with other musical forms. At the same time, he released music by leading new wave artists and contemporary jazz musicians.[6]

Through his company, Pacheco released albums by some of the most significative flamenco artists of the period: Carlos Benavent, Diego Carrasco, Jorge Pardo, Ketama, La Macanita, Pata Negra, Golpes Bajos, Martirio, Ray Heredia and La Barbería del Sur, among others.[2][3]

In addition, he released assorted music created by British rock music groups Joy Division, New Order and The Smiths; minimalist musician Steve Reich; jazzists Bill Evans, Keith Jarrett Pat Metheny and Art Pepper, and Cuban music compilations of Bola de Nieve and Benny Moré. He also mixed compilations of his label artists in the series Los Jóvenes Flamencos.[3]

At the time of his death from cancer in Madrid, Pacheco was the president of the Unión Fonográfica Independiente (UFI), the association of Spanish independent labels.[3]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ Fairley, Jan (5 December 2010). "Mario Pacheco obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 August 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "The Dead Rock Stars Club". 
  3. ^ a b c d "World-Music-Central.com – Article". 
  4. ^ Fotheringham, Alasdair (7 January 2011). "Mario Pacheco: Record producer and founder of the pioneering flamenco". The Independent. Retrieved 3 August 2017. 
  5. ^ Billboard.biz – Obituary
  6. ^ Flamenco-World.com Interview Archived 2011-06-15 at the Wayback Machine.