Mark Alan Stamaty

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Mark Alan Stamaty
Born 1947
Brooklyn, New York
Nationality American
http://www.markalanstamaty.com/

Mark Alan Stamaty is an American cartoonist and children's writer and illustrator. During the 1980s and 1990s, Stamaty's work appeared regularly in the Village Voice.[1] He is the creator of the long-running comic strip Washingtoon, as well as the earlier comic strip MacDoodle Street, and the online strip Doodlennium for Slate magazine[2] He is also a spot illustrator for Slate.[3] He produced a monthly comic strip in the New York Times Book Review called "Boox" in 2001–2004 that made fun of publishing trends.[4]

Stamaty has published several books, including collections of his strips and graphic novels for children, notably Alia's Mission: Saving the Books of Iraq (2004)[5] and the cult classic Who Needs Donuts? (originally published in 1973 and reprinted by Random House in 2003)[6]

In 2012, Jeffrey Brown told USA Today about how Stamaty's Small in the Saddle had influenced his own career and about subsequently meeting the author.[7]

Stamaty was commissioned to provide an illustration for the interior of retailer Sonos's new store in New York City's SoHo district, which opened in July 2016.[8]

His late father, Stanley Stamaty, was a professional gag cartoonist, and his mother, Clara Gee Stamaty, is a commercial illustrator and fine artist. Stanley and Clara both attended the Art Academy of Cincinnati.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-06-20. Retrieved 2010-12-03. 
  2. ^ http://www.slate.com/id/2007
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-06-20. Retrieved 2010-12-03. 
  4. ^ "Bio of Mark Alan Stamaty". Retrieved December 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Iraqi Librarian Becomes Cultural Hero in 2 Children's Books". The New York Times. March 17, 2005. 
  6. ^ https://www.amazon.com/Needs-Donuts-Mark-Alan-Stamaty/dp/0375825509
  7. ^ Smith, Zack (30 October 2012). "Cartoonist talks about his favorite children's book". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Retrieved 21 February 2017. 
  8. ^ Abrams, Melanie (11 November 2016). "Have Some Art With Your Handbag". The New York Times. New York City. Retrieved 21 February 2017. 
  9. ^ http://njjewishnews.com/njjn.com/020509/moFountainOfYouth.html

External links[edit]