Mark Deutrom

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Mark Deutrom is a musician, composer, songwriter, and producer, best known as the Bassist for the Multi-genre band The Melvins from 1993 to 1998.

Career[edit]

In the early 1980s Deutrom was a member of a Los Angeles based art co-op called Werkgruppe founded by D. Emily Hicks and Daniel Joseph Martinez. Lori Black was also a member. Deutrom contributed several multichannel soundtracks for Hicks' and Martinez's conceptual pieces culminating in a 23 channel synthetic audio environment for the 1984 Olympics Arts Festival installation entitled "The Peoples of Los Angeles". The piece included multiplex holograms of individuals from Los Angeles reciting soundtracks of their experiences in the region against a constantly shifting holographic audio ambience. Other collaborators included physicist and holographer Lloyd Cross, holographer Sharon McCormack, artist Abbe Don and musician Chili Charles. The exhibition was held at the University of Southern California Atelier Gallery in Santa Monica. A catalog was published that included 3-D glasses. "The Peoples of Los Angeles" was reviewed in The Los Angeles Herald Examiner.[1] It was also reviewed in The Los Angeles Times.[2]

In 1993, following the release of their album Houdini, Deutrom joined the Melvins as a bass player. His first album recorded with the Melvins was their 1994 release Stoner Witch, followed by Stag in 1996 and lastly Honky a year later. During his tenure in the Melvins, they touring with acts such as Rush and Nine Inch Nails. Mark Deutrom left the band in 1998 to pursue other projects. In 2000, he released his first solo album "The Silent Treatment," which was reissued in 2018.

Deutrom played with the drone metal act Sunn O))) for several shows in 2006.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Drohojowska, Hunter. "Holograms Document the Faces of America." Los Angeles Herald Examiner' June 29, 1984.
  2. ^ Solomon, Charles. "9 Portraits Shown in 3 Dimensions. Los Angeles Times'.' July 11, 1984.
  3. ^ "Mark Deutrom re-issues debut album "The Silent Treatment"". 

External links[edit]