Mark Dresser

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Mark Dresser
Born (1952-09-26) September 26, 1952 (age 69)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
GenresAvant-garde jazz, free improvisation, chamber jazz
Occupation(s)Musician, composer
InstrumentsDouble bass
Years active1970s–present
LabelsSoul Note, Knitting Factory, Tzadik, Cryptogramophone, Enja, Clean Feed, Pi, CIMP
Websitemark-dresser.com

Mark Dresser (born September 26, 1952)[1] is an American double bass player and composer.

Career[edit]

Dresser was born in Los Angeles, California, United States.[1] In the 1970s, he was a member of Black Music Infinity led by Stanley Crouch and performed with the San Diego Symphony.[2] During the next decade he moved to New York City and became a member of the Anthony Braxton quartet with Marilyn Crispell and Gerry Hemingway.[2][3][4] He composed for the Arcado String Trio and Tambastics and for the film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.[2]

Discography[edit]

As leader[edit]

  • Arcado with Arcado String Trio (JMT, 1989)
  • Behind the Myth with Arcado String Trio (JMT, 1990)
  • For Three Strings and Orchestra with Arcado String Trio (JMT, 1992)
  • The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Knitting Factory, 1994)
  • Invocation (Knitting Factory, 1995)
  • Force Green (Soul Note, 1995)
  • Live in Europe with Arcado String Trio (Avant, 1996)
  • Banquet (Tzadik, 1997)
  • Eye'll Be Seeing You (Knitting Factory, 1998)
  • C/D/E with Andrew Cyrille (Pao, 2000)
  • Marinade (Tzadik, 2000)
  • Later with Fred Frith (Victo, 2000)
  • The Marks Brothers with Mark Helias (W.E.R.F., 2000)
  • Sonomondo with Frances-Marie Uitti (Cryptogramophone, 2000)
  • Duologues with Denman Maroney (Victo, 2001)
  • Reunion Live... at the Guelph Festival with Gerry Hemingway (Intrepid Ear, 2001)
  • Aquifer (Cryptogramophone, 2002)
  • Nine Songs Together with Ray Anderson (CIMP, 2003)
  • Tone Time with Susie Ibarra (Wobbly Rail, 2003)
  • Time Changes with Denman Maroney (Cryptogramophone, 2005)
  • Unveil (Clean Feed, 2005)
  • Airwalkers with Roswell Rudd (Clean Feed, 2006)
  • House of Mirrors with Ed Harkins (Clean Feed, 2008)
  • Duetto with Diane Moser (CIMP, 2008)
  • Starmelodics with Kauffman/Eisenstadt (Nuscope, 2009)
  • Live in Concert with Denman Maroney (Kadima Collective, 2009)
  • Live at Lotus with Vinny Golia (Kadima Collective, 2010)
  • Soul to Soul with Remi Alvarez (Intolerancia, 2010)
  • Guts (Kadima Collective, 2010)
  • Synastry with Jen Shyu (Pi, 2011)
  • Nourishments (Clean Feed, 2013)
  • Code Re(a)d with Gerry Hemingway (Hopscotch, 2014)
  • Sedimental You (Clean Feed, 2016)
  • Modicana (NoBusiness, 2017)
  • Ain't Nothing But a Cyber Coup & You (Clean Feed, 2019)

As sideman[edit]

With Ray Anderson

With Tim Berne

With Jane Ira Bloom

With Bobby Bradford

  • Lost in L.A. (Soul Note, 1984)
  • Live in L.A. (Clean Feed, 2011)
  • Live at the Open Gate (NoBusiness, 2016)

With Anthony Braxton

With Dave Douglas

With Satoko Fujii

  • Looking Out of the Window (Ninety-One, 1997)
  • Kitsune-bi (Tzadik, 1999)
  • Toward To West (Enja, 2000)
  • Junction (EWE, 2001)
  • Bell the Cat! (Tokuma, 2002)
  • Illusion Suite (Libra, 2004)
  • Live in Japan 2004 (Natsat Music, 2005)
  • When We Were There (PJL, 2006)
  • Trace a River (Libra, 2008)

With Gerry Hemingway

  • Demon Chaser (hat ART, 1993)
  • Down to the Wire (hat ART, 1993)
  • The Marmalade King (hat ART, 1995)
  • Slamadam (Random Acoustics, 1995)
  • Perfect World (Random Acoustics, 1996)
  • Johnny's Corner Song (Auricle, 1998)
  • Chamber Works (Tzadik, 1999)
  • Waltzes, Two-Steps & Other Matters of the Heart (GM, 1999)
  • Devils Paradise (Clean Feed, 2003)

With Bob Ostertag

  • Say No More (RecRec Music, 1993)
  • Say No More in Person (Transit, 1993)
  • Verbatim (Rastascan, 1996)
  • Verbatim Flesh and Blood (Rastascan, 1998)

With John Zorn

With others

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Colin Larkin, ed. (1992). The Guinness Encyclopedia of Popular Music (First ed.). Guinness Publishing. p. 732/3. ISBN 0-85112-939-0.
  2. ^ a b c Layne, Joslyn. "Mark Dresser". AllMusic. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  3. ^ Layman, Will (28 May 2019). "Mark Dresser Seven: Ain't Nothing But a Cyber Coup and You". PopMatters. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  4. ^ Dansby, Andrew (28 February 2019). "Mark Dresser still the ace of bass". HoustonChronicle.com. Retrieved 28 July 2020.

External links[edit]