Mark Gray (singer)

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Mark Gray
Birth name Mark Eugene Gray[1]
Born (1952-10-24)October 24, 1952
Vicksburg, Mississippi, U.S.
Died December 2, 2016(2016-12-02) (aged 64)
Lebanon, Tennessee, U.S.
Genres Country
Occupation(s) Singer
Instruments Vocals, keyboards
Years active 1979–1988
Labels Columbia, 615
Associated acts Exile

Mark Eugene Gray (October 24, 1952 – December 2, 2016) was an American singer-songwriter and country music artist. He recorded both as a solo artist for Columbia Records and as a member of the country pop band Exile, of which he was a member between 1979 and 1982.

Gray's solo career included three albums and eight Top 40 country hits, of which the highest-peaking is the No. 6 Tammy Wynette duet "Sometimes When We Touch", a cover of the Dan Hill song. Gray also co-wrote "Take Me Down" and "The Closer You Get", both of which were originally recorded by Exile and later became Number One hits for Alabama. Other songs that Gray co-wrote include "It Ain't Easy Being Easy" for Janie Fricke and "Second Hand Heart" for Gary Morris. He died on December 2, 2016, at the age of 64.[2]

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Title Album details Peak
positions
US Country
Magic 26
This Ol' Piano
  • Release date: November 1984
  • Label: Columbia Records
33
That Feeling Inside
  • Release date: January 1986
  • Label: Columbia Records
35

Singles[edit]

Year Title Peak positions Album
US Country
[3]
CAN Country
1983 "It Ain't Real (If It Ain't You)" 25 Magic
"Wounded Hearts" 18
1984 "Left Side of the Bed" 10 28
"If All the Magic Is Gone" 9 6
"Diamond in the Dust" 9 4 This Ol' Piano
1985 "Sometimes When We Touch" (with Tammy Wynette) 6 24
"Smooth Sailing (Rock in the Road)" 43 30
"Please Be Love" 7 3 That Feeling Inside
1986 "Back When Love Was Enough" 14 7
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Search results for Mark Gray". Broadcast Music Incorporated. Retrieved 2009-08-11. 
  2. ^ Morris, Edward (December 4, 2016). "Mark Gray, '80s Hitmaker, Dead at 64". CMT. Retrieved February 6, 2017. 
  3. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 168. ISBN 0-89820-177-2.